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Financial Aid Application Process Students must first apply for admission and be accepted to SCAD in order to receive financial aid. Online applications are preferred and may be completed at www.scad.edu/apply. Students also should complete the Free Application for


Federal Student Aid online at www.fafsa.ed.gov, and include SCAD as a school choice using the SCAD code number 015022. Accurate income tax information should be used to answer all questions. Within three weeks after filing the FAFSA online, students


should receive a Student Aid Report. Students should review the SAR for accuracy and submit any necessary revisions to the federal processor. Students who receive a request for additional information


from the SCAD financial aid office should complete and return the information promptly. After all information has been received and processed, an


official award of financial assistance is sent to the student from SCAD. The award lists all financial assistance the student can receive, including scholarships, grants and loans.


FEDERAL AID


U.S. citizens and legal residents may apply for federal aid by filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid with the federal processing center as soon as possible after January 1 each year. This can be done online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The SCAD FAFSA code is 015022. Students must be officially admitted to SCAD in order to be considered for financial aid. Federal aid applicants are encouraged to complete the


FAFSA as soon as their annual income tax figures become available. SCAD processes federal aid throughout the year on a first-completed, first-awarded basis. Early application is encouraged and allows more time for students to explore all financial aid options. After the FAFSA is processed, the government generates a


multi-page Student Aid Report for each applicant. After SCAD has received an electronic version of the Student Aid Report from the government and the applicant is officially admitted to SCAD, a financial aid package is determined. This process generally begins in early March for fall enrollment. The entire process may take several weeks. SCAD accepts and enrolls new students each quarter. Students who intend to use financial assistance to pay tuition, room and board, should plan to complete the application for admission and the FAFSA at least six months prior to the intended entry date. Otherwise, the student should plan to pay first-quarter expenses out of personal funds, as federal funds may not be processed prior to enrollment. Students should review each specific aid program for details


at www.scad.edu/financialaid. Further information about federal aid can be found at www.studentaid.ed.gov.


Concurrent Enrollment and Transient Status A student who wishes to be degree-seeking at two or more postsecondary institutions concurrently may receive federal/ state financial aid at only one college. Once a student has requested financial aid to attend SCAD, he or she may not apply for federal/state aid at any other institution. Transient students who receive the Georgia HOPE scholarship may be eligible


student f inancial services


to receive it while in transient status and should contact the SCAD financial aid office for details. Currently enrolled SCAD students who wish to attend another college or university as a transient student and transfer credits back to SCAD must pursue transient status through the registrar’s office at SCAD before taking classes at the other institution.


FEDERAL GRANTS


Pell Grant (nonrepayable funds) The Pell Grant is a need-based grant available to degree- seeking students who are pursuing their first undergraduate degree. Student eligibility is based upon the Estimated Family Contribution as calculated by the federal government based on information the student provided in completing the FAFSA. Funds are available to full-time and three-quarter-time students and some less-than-half-time students.


Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (nonrepayable funds) The SEOG program was established to assist in making the benefits of postsecondary education available to first-time, degree-seeking undergraduate students. Awards are based upon the remaining unmet need of Pell eligible students. Funds are available to full-time and three-quarter-time students on a very limited basis.


Academic Competitiveness Grant (nonrepayable funds) The Academic Competitiveness Grant program assists in making the benefits of postsecondary education available to first-time, degree-seeking, full-time undergraduate students who are eligible to receive a federal Pell Grant. First- and second-year students who have recently graduated from a federally-defined rigorous high school program may qualify.


FEDERAL LOANS


William D. Ford Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford Loan (repayable funds) This loan program enables students to borrow funds directly from the U.S. Department of Education to assist with educational expenses. Undergraduate student borrowers can borrow from US$5,500 to US$12,500 per academic year (three quarters), depending on class level and dependency status as determined by the FAFSA. Regular graduate student borrowers can borrow from US$8,500 to US$20,500 per academic year (three quarters). Graduate student borrowers admitted with required preliminary undergraduate coursework are subject to undergraduate loan limits and enrollment rules until they proceed into the regular graduate program. The amount of subsidized vs. unsubsidized loan that can be borrowed is determined by results from the FAFSA. The amount credited to the student account is reduced by a federally mandated processing fee. Repayment of Stafford loans begins after graduation, dropping below half-time enrollment, or ceasing enrollment.


William D. Ford Direct PLUS Loan for Graduate Students (repayable funds) The Grad PLUS loan program enables credit-worthy graduate- level students to borrow funds for educational purposes. Graduate students may borrow the full cost of education or any educational expenses that other student aid does not


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