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and thus a reflection of that culture’s values. They also assess them critically as literary works of art. Students write essays in response to these manuals, do com- parative analyses, participate in group presentations, and produce an original quarter-length project of their own art and design writing. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, WRIT 277.


WRIT 309 Travel Writing and Autobiography A critical study of the genres of American travel writing and autobiography, students read seminal texts of each form spanning the 18th-20th centuries, including works by Benjamin Franklin, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Edith Wharton and Bill Bryson. The issues of genre, gender and representations of the self are explored, as are the conventions and blending of the boundaries separating these forms. Students write critical analyses of these texts as well as produce a quarter-length creative essay reflective of the generic considerations discussed. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 277.


WRIT 310 Editing and Management As a blend of intensive study and hands-on applica- tions, this course leads students through the funda- mentals of editing and its function in technical, trade and academic publishing. This course allows students to develop the primary skills necessary in publication management with an emphasis on journal produc- tion, newsletter production, and book publication. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 210.


WRIT 322 Writing About Place This course focuses on two genres of writing that both encompass the idea of “place,” our natural environ- ment and the environment of culture. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 177.


WRIT 325 Advanced Writing for Television Starting with the pilot developed in Writing for Televi- sion, students further develop dialogue and characters to complete work begun in that course. The student writes two complete scripts for their original pilot, builds a team of writers from peers in class, and writes and develops the show’s creation story (bible) that is the basis for future episodes. This advanced level of study is designed to push students to create in a more professional setting, including working as a writ- ing team, creating a fully pitchable show and all the required elements. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 225.


WRIT 345 News Writing and Editing Through lectures, workshops and discussion, students will focus on the skills of news reporting and editing, including the ethical aspects involved in journalism. Students will discuss the media coverage of contem- porary news stories, participate in group brainstorm- ing meetings to generate story ideas, and experiment with workshop-style critique sessions. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


WRIT 350 Writing the Critical Review Contemporary writing must include the art of criticism in all fields studied at SCAD. Magazines, newspapers, online ‘zines, TV and radio reviews, publishers’ and liner notes, as well as Web sites and blogs, demand of the writer a sharp critical faculty, and the ability to put critical thought into words. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 177.


WRIT 355 Writing and New Media I As costs for production, storage and distribution of information come down, opportunities exist for writing in new media venues, including not just the personal computer, but also computer networks, digital mobile devices, ubiquitous computing and even virtual reali- ties. From the everyday to the unusual, this course will examine all aspects of new media and the related writing processes. Students explore the history of new media and gain experience writing about new media and writing with new media tools and technologies. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 255.


WRIT 377 Nonfiction Writing III Primarily for writing minors, this course helps students polish their work for publication, providing advanced training in techniques of nonfiction writing through workshops and revisions. Students produce work for a public forum. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 277.


WRIT 410 Literary Journalism This course uses fiction writing techniques to tell non- fiction stories. Students review the history of this new, exciting and popular genre by reading the work of its most accomplished writers. Students will research their topics, conduct successful interviews and structure the information they have gathered into compelling narratives. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 177.


WRIT 420 Forms in Creative Nonfiction From the essays of Montaigne to contemporary literary journalism, students explore creative nonfiction while developing criteria from which to understand this genre’s historical path to today’s “best seller” status. Focus will be placed on the rich literary, critical, and philosophical issues inherent to creative nonfiction. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level WRIT course.


WRIT 425 Autobiography and Memoir This class will focus on writing autobiography and memoir. Students hone their use of characteriza- tion, setting, symbolism, metaphor, and will explore opportunities to publish their work. Students will read seminal primary and secondary texts that span the 18th through 21st centuries as well as critical assess- ments of autobiography. The issues of genre, gender, and self representation will be explored as will modern variations of the autobiographical text such as blogs and personal webpages. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level WRIT course.


WRIT 455 Writing and New Media II In this course, students explore some of the more sophisticated elements of new media including tech journalism and instructional design. Students continue to examine the ethical and cultural implications of new media and analyze current theories associated with the creation and use of new media. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 355.


WRIT 480 Writing Portfolio This course focuses on portfolios and their place in the world of writing. Each student creates a portfolio that focuses on a specific area of interests dictated by the students’ individual career goals. Lectures, readings, and field trips help prepare students for professional writing situations. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 305 or WRIT 355.


WRIT 495 Special Topics in Writing The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each seminar focuses on various issues in the field of professional writing and allows students to pursue individual projects related to the subject of the course. Prerequisite(s): Vary according to topic.


Writing (Graduate)


WRIT 703 Writing for New Media Students will examine the development of new media, explore its theoretical, social, and practical implica- tions, and examine new media through and relative to the writing process in order to understand and com- municate using new media and technology.


WRIT 713 Nonfiction Writing I In this course, students will work on their essays or chapters of a nonfiction work. Their efforts will be developed towards mastery of their own writing style. Students will also present and discuss their works in the classroom environment.


WRIT 723 Nonfiction Writing II Students in this course continue to work on their essays or chapters and themes from Nonfiction I. Activities include furthering previous works in nonfic- tion as way to develop mastery in their own idiom. This course enables students to work toward a booklength, publishable manuscript, a collection of essays, or the- sis. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 713.


WRIT 725 Persuasive Writing This course approaches persuasive writing as an essential complement to visual forms such as adver- tising design. It also explores the deconstruction of


written expression associated with advertising, design and promotion embodied in copywriting for visually creative scenarios.


WRIT 743 Business and Professional Writing Students in this course will learn the skills neces- sary to communicate effectively, professionally, and persuasively to a wide variety of workplace audi- ences. Students will gain experience creating various workplace documents including proposals, reports, and procedures as well as typical forms of business correspondence such as letters and memos. Collabora- tion, communicating ethically, and communicating with international audiences will also be stressed.


WRIT 744 Writing the First Chapter in Fiction or Nonfiction Graduate work in starting one’s first novel or work of nonfiction provides intensive focus on the first chapter-the foundation of all large works-and how to get started on one’s graduate thesis material.


WRIT 753 Freelance Writing for Publication Course topics include writing query letters, proposals, conducting interviews, and writing for journalism and narrative style nonfiction. Every activity within this course is intended to expose the student to potential markets that a freelance writer can pursue while nego- tiating the realities of the publication industry.


WRIT 760 Forms in Creative Nonfiction From Shakespeare’s history plays to Thomas Wolf’s Executioner’s Song, students will explore creative nonfiction from a fresh perspective, while developing a criteria from which to understand this genre’s develop- ment to today’s current “best seller” status.


WRIT 763 The Publishing Process Graduate work in The Publishing Process will include writing query letters, formal book proposals, sub- mitting work to outside editors, and working in an editorial setting in the classroom. Workshop will be conducted as an editorial meeting, with agendas, focus and critique.


WRIT 773 Promotional Writing Students are immersed into the study and practice of promotional writing. Students develop and write a complete promotion plan, which will include a press release, press kit, and brochure writing. Topics covered include the study of promotional strategies, promotion tool development and creation, event planning, and measuring promotion effectiveness. Communications skills both oral and written are required of successful business people; one of the purposes of the course is to sensitize students to the importance of good communication skills. Therefore, students will do a variety of written and oral communication exercises. Promotional writing helps secure publicity and clients for artists and art businesses, improving prospects, sales, and awareness. Students will adopt a local non- SCAD arts business, apply promotional principles, create promotional materials, and present results. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 725.


WRIT 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


WRIT 779T Graduate Teaching Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


WRIT 790 Writing M.F.A. Thesis Students enrolled in the M.F.A. program in Writing are required to complete a thesis demonstrating knowl- edge of forms and the history of their discipline, as well as professional writing skills. Students will work with their faculty advisor throughout the process of thesis completion.


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