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F if the required work is not completed satisfactorily by mid- term of the following quarter. A student may not withdraw from a class after receiving a grade of incomplete. A student who has missed more than four class sessions, 20


percent, in a quarter is not eligible for a grade of incomplete, but may withdraw at any time after the end of the drop/add period and through the last day of the quarter.


Academic Standing


Students are expected to make satisfactory progress toward their degree and are responsible at all times for knowing their academic standing and for fulfilling all requirements of the university by referring to published academic policies, regulations and standards and by consulting with the appropriate dean, department chair or adviser. Students are responsible for ascertaining and meeting course requirements, prerequisite requirements, graduation requirements, appropriate course sequencing and any other requirements of the university. At the sole discretion of the university, a student may be


placed on academic warning or probation, or may be suspended or dismissed for any reason deemed by SCAD officials to be in the best interest of the student or of the university as a whole.


Good Standing For undergraduate students, good academic standing is defined by a 2.0 overall grade point average. For graduate students, good academic standing is defined by a 3.0 overall grade point average.


Academic Warning An undergraduate student whose term grade point average falls below 2.0 for any quarter or a graduate student whose term grade point average falls below 3.0 for any quarter receives a warning that his or her academic status is unsatisfactory.


Probation An undergraduate student whose term grade point average falls below 2.0 for two consecutive quarters or a graduate student whose term grade point average falls below 3.0 for two consecutive quarters is placed on academic probation and is notified by the university. Students who are placed on probation must meet with their staff adviser before the end of the second week of the next quarter to establish a success plan. Students on probation may not withdraw from any class and must abide by the terms outlined in their probation letter. Undergraduate students are removed from probation when they achieve a grade point average of at least 2.0; graduate students are removed from probation when they achieve a grade point average of at least 3.0.


Suspension An undergraduate student whose term grade point average falls below 2.0 for three consecutive quarters is suspended from the university for one calendar year. After that time, the student may submit a written petition to the registrar to return to SCAD. The petition should include all potential justification for continued enrollment at SCAD, including, but not limited to, counseling, tutoring, medical treatment or academic success programming. Reinstatement is not guaranteed.


academic programs and pol icies


If the student is reinstated, he or she returns on academic


probation, must meet with a staff adviser prior to registering for classes and must complete an academic success program as outlined by the reinstatement letter. This may include the requirement to register for specific courses or to take a reduced course load. A graduate student whose term grade point average falls


below 3.0 for three consecutive quarters is dismissed from SCAD and is not reinstated.


Dismissal A student who has been suspended and reinstated, and does not meet satisfactory academic progress during the first quarter of his or her return, is dismissed from the university.


Academic Integrity


Under all circumstances, students are expected to be honest in their dealings with faculty, administrative staff and other students. For purposes of this policy, the term faculty or faculty member includes any person engaged by the university to act in a teaching capacity, regardless of the person’s actual title. In speaking with members of the SCAD community, students must give an accurate representation of the facts at hand. Failure to do so is considered a breach of the Student Code of Conduct and may result in sanctions against the student, including suspension or dismissal. In class assignments, students must submit work that fairly


and accurately reflects their level of accomplishment. Any work that is not a product of the student’s own efforts is considered dishonest. Students must not engage in academic dishonesty; doing so can have serious consequences. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following: 1. Cheating, which includes, but is not limited to, (a) the giving or receiving of any unauthorized assistance in producing assignments or taking quizzes, tests or examinations; (b) dependence on the aid of sources including technology beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems or carrying out other assignments; (c) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the college faculty or staff; or (d) the use of unauthorized assistance in the preparation of works of art.


2. Plagiarism, which includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. Plagiarism also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials.


3. Submission of the same work in two or more classes without prior written approval of the professors of the classes involved.


4. Submission of any work not actually produced by the student submitting the work without full and clear written acknowledgement of the actual author or creator of the work.


If a faculty member suspects a student of academic dishonesty, the faculty member first discusses the concern with the student. If academic dishonesty is still suspected, the faculty member must notify the vice president for academic services (Savannah, eLearning) or the associate vice president for academic services (Atlanta, Hong Kong) and submit all


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