This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
b. 85 on the Internet-based test with minimum score of 20 on each section.


2. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) minimum score of at least 6.5.


3. American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), “high advanced” score on the writing proficiency portion of the test.


4. Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) minimum score of at least 500 on the critical reading portion. For applicants whose native language is English, or whose academic transcripts show extensive study in an institution in which English is the language of instruction, no additional proof of English proficiency is required. Students who meet the minimum required composite


score but do not meet the minimum section scores will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis for possible exemption. All decisions are final. Applicants who meet or exceed all other SCAD admission requirements, but do not demonstrate English proficiency through minimum TOEFL, IELTS, ACTFL or SAT scores, may be admitted to the SCAD English as a Second Language (ESL) program. These students must take a SCAD English language proficiency test to be placed in the appropriate level of ESL. Students must satisfactorily complete the ESL program through Level IV prior to advancing into any academic course of study at SCAD and must continue taking ESL through satisfactory completion of Level VI. Students who score below 50 on the internet-based TOEFL; below 4.5 on the IELTS; or place at the intermediate low-, novice high-, mid- or low-proficiency levels on the ACTFL writing proficiency test may consider admission into the online ESL program. **** Official certification of sources and funds. Copy of the first page of the applicant’s passport (requested, but not required). A copy of the first page of the passport for any dependent accompanying the student also is requested. These documents are used to verify correct spelling of names, correct birth dates, and other information vital to student registration.


Supplementary Materials All applicants may submit supplementary materials to enhance their admission files and to be considered for an artistic scholarship. 1. Portfolio, audition or writing submission. (See undergraduate portfolio guidelines.) The portfolio, audition, riding or writing submission is scored according to a rubric relevant to the type of submission.


2. Recommendations. One to three recommendations may be submitted by a professor, teacher, counselor or community leader with whom the applicant has had immediate contact. Recommendations should address the applicant’s level of commitment, as well as attributes such as creativity, initiative, motivation, character and academic achievement, to aid in assessing the applicant’s reasonable potential for success as a student at SCAD. Recommendations may not come from friends or family members except in the case of a teacher-parent.


3. Statement of purpose. The statement should be no more than 500 words in length and should give an overview of the applicant’s academic and personal experience, describing preparation for and commitment to further study at SCAD, as well as educational and professional goals and aspirations.


4. Résumé/list of achievements and awards. 5. Personal or telephone interview. (May be scheduled by contacting the admission department.)


admi ss ion


Articulation Agreements Articulation agreements outline the specific programs of study students may complete in order to acquire an associate degree at certain colleges and transfer to SCAD with advanced standing as a Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Arts candidate. Students must apply and be accepted to SCAD. For a complete listing of SCAD’s articulation agreements, go to www.scad.edu/articulation.


Undergraduate Transfer Credits After an undergraduate transfer applicant is accepted for admission, official transcripts showing completed collegiate coursework are evaluated by the admission office to determine whether or not the student may be granted advanced standing. The coursework must be found to be relevant to the degree the student is seeking at SCAD, with course content and level of instruction resulting in student competencies comparable to or higher than those of students enrolled at SCAD. In assessing and documenting comparable learning through course content and level of instruction, SCAD uses recognized guidelines that aid in the evaluation of credit, such as those published by the American Council on Education, the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, and the National Association of Foreign Student Advisors . This policy is consistent with the mission of SCAD and ensures that coursework and learning outcomes are at the collegiate level and comparable to SCAD’s degree programs. Generally, transfer credit may be accepted from institutions


that are approved by the U.S. Department of Education and hold regional accreditation, or have appropriate specialized or programmatic accreditation, or have been evaluated and proven to be comparable in course content and level of instruction to SCAD, or are recognized by the ministry of education or equivalent agency in the applicant’s home country. Course content is evaluated by comparing the curricula of other institutions with that of SCAD and assessing whether or not foundation studies, general education and major discipline courses are comparable to those offered at SCAD. Level of instruction is evaluated by comparing the percentage of faculty at other institutions who hold graduate and terminal degrees with the percentage of faculty at SCAD who hold graduate and terminal degrees. Students who wish to appeal the decision of SCAD regarding


transfer of credit from international institutions may provide an outside credential evaluation, although SCAD reserves the right to make a final determination of transfer credit. A list of acceptable outside evaluators can be obtained from the admission office. A maximum of 90 quarter hours of undergraduate credit


for a bachelor’s degree may be given for courses appropriate to the SCAD curriculum. Only grades of at least 2.0 (C) may be transferred for undergraduate credit. Failure to submit an updated transcript may result in loss of transfer credit. A portfolio review is required for transfer of specific studio


courses during the student’s first quarter of enrollment and for final determination of transfer credit. To receive specific studio course credit, students must follow the portfolio submission criteria and guidelines available through the admission office. Additionally, a review of all course syllabi may be required. Portfolios are reviewed by qualified admission staff and also may be reviewed by faculty members from the applicable department. Transfer credit is granted when the quality of work in the portfolio is found to be at least equivalent to that which would earn a grade of 2.0 (C) or better in an equivalent or


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310  |  Page 311  |  Page 312  |  Page 313  |  Page 314  |  Page 315  |  Page 316  |  Page 317  |  Page 318  |  Page 319  |  Page 320  |  Page 321  |  Page 322  |  Page 323  |  Page 324  |  Page 325  |  Page 326  |  Page 327  |  Page 328  |  Page 329  |  Page 330  |  Page 331  |  Page 332  |  Page 333  |  Page 334  |  Page 335  |  Page 336  |  Page 337  |  Page 338  |  Page 339  |  Page 340  |  Page 341  |  Page 342  |  Page 343  |  Page 344  |  Page 345  |  Page 346  |  Page 347  |  Page 348  |  Page 349  |  Page 350  |  Page 351  |  Page 352  |  Page 353  |  Page 354  |  Page 355  |  Page 356  |  Page 357  |  Page 358  |  Page 359  |  Page 360  |  Page 361  |  Page 362  |  Page 363  |  Page 364  |  Page 365  |  Page 366  |  Page 367  |  Page 368  |  Page 369  |  Page 370  |  Page 371  |  Page 372  |  Page 373  |  Page 374  |  Page 375  |  Page 376  |  Page 377  |  Page 378  |  Page 379  |  Page 380  |  Page 381  |  Page 382  |  Page 383  |  Page 384
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com