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become familiar with kiln firing. Preliminary drawings, both small- and full-scale, are required. Prerequisite(s): CERA 125.


CERA 400 Advanced Applications in Ceramics After exploring the boundaries of clay at the intermedi- ate levels, students in this course focuses on develop- ing a portfolio-quality body of ceramic work through diverse technical and aesthetic approaches. Addi- tionally, students learn about the science of clay and glaze formulation explored through projects, in-class exercises, and lab work. Prerequisite(s): CERA 325.


CERA 499 Special Topics in Ceramic Arts The topic of this course varies from term to term. Each course focuses on various issues in the field of ceram- ics and allows students to pursue individual projects related to the subject of the course. Prerequisite(s): Vary according to topic.


CERA 701 Architectural Ceramics Designed to explore the diverse properties of clay as an architectural material, this course presents a broad range of techniques, processes and design principles relating to the making and installation of architectural ceramics, including bricks and tiles for murals. Clay and glaze applications and formulations are covered. Historical and contemporary issues related to ceramic usage in architectural contexts are also addressed.


Character Technical Direction (Undergraduate)


CHAR 310 Scripting for Animators Students experienced in digital animation and char- acter set-up learn how to streamline work-flow using MEL scripting to automate character model building, animate actions, and rig characters. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 280.


CHAR 314 Facial Setup and Animation Animated characters get much of their character from their faces. Design, style, texture, and expressive articulation all contribute toward more memorable animated storytelling. In this course, students explore all aspects of facial design, modeling, texturing, rigging and animation. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 280.


CHAR 340 Non-human Character Set-up The anatomical challenges of finding rigging solutions for the unique characteristics of non-human motion are explored in this class. Use of scripting languages to expedite work-flow also are explored. Emphasis is placed on the problem-solving responsibilities of a Creature Technical Director, to include integration of muscle, cloth and fur into the rig. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 280.


CHAR 350 Advanced Character Setup This course explores the basic principles of creating an animatable skeleton for a 3-D puppet, as applied to a series of anatomically different biped and quad- ruped characters. Students are assigned a prebuilt model to rig, explore advanced tools and apply them to various anatomical problems to find modeling and rigging solutions for believable character motion, and finally test the rigs with basic motion assignments. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 280.


Cinema Studies (Undergraduate)


CINE 205 Reading Films Students in this course learn the basic formal com- ponents of cinema (narrative, mise-en-scène, editing, cinematography, sound), and gain an understanding of how those elements are applied in narrative, documen- tary and experimental cinema. Students view a variety of landmark films and analyze them with an attention to the relationship between their formal and thematic components. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


CINE 275 History of Cinema The development of the motion picture medium is examined through lectures, readings and screenings of landmark works. Students are expected to analyze film as an art form, a communications tool and an entertainment source. Technological developments


and sociological influences are considered, as well as the present and future directions of the medium. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123 or ENGL 124.


CINE 315 American Cinema Students examine in depth the development of the motion picture medium in America through lectures, readings and screenings of landmark works. Students are expected to analyze film as an art form, a commu- nications tool and an entertainment source. Cultural and sociological influences are considered, as well as the present and future directions of American cinema. Prerequisite(s): CINE 275 or FILM 224.


CINE 325 World Cinema Students examine the development of international cinema through lectures, readings and screenings of landmark works. The course considers some European cinema, with a primary focus on non-Western cinema. Students are introduced to a variety of topics that ori- ent world cinema, including colonialism, globalization, censorship, nationalism and transnational production Students are expected to analyze film as an art form, a communications tool and an entertainment source. Prerequisite(s): CINE 275.


CINE 410 Special Topics in Cinema Studies This elective course provides an opportunity for students to focus on particular issues in the field of cinema studies. Faculty, course content and prereq- uisites vary each time the course is offered. The class may include lectures, discussions, individual projects and critiques, depending on the nature of the topic.


Cinema Studies (Graduate)


CINE 703 Research Methodology in Cinema Studies This course reviews the historical methods of research in cinema studies history, criticism, and theory as a means to examine the changes taking place in the research methodologies and the writing of cinema studies scholarship as they are currently practiced.


CINE 705 History of Cinema This course offers an overview of the historical evolu- tion of the motion pictures, examining how movies help us understand the specific places and times dur- ing which they arose, and illuminating the particular concerns of the people who made them.


CINE 710 Critical Concepts in Cinema Studies: Narratology, Aesthetics and Auteurism This course examines issues of narratology (dramatic structure, story-telling strategies, issues concerning genre studies), aesthetics (film’s formal components such as mis-en-scéne, editing, camera angles, fram- ing, cinematography, sound), and auteurism (a more in-depth exploration of the idea of the director as the chief “author” of a film), and explores the interrelation- ships between these three concepts.


CINE 715 American Cinema The development of the motion picture medium in America is examined through lectures, readings and screenings of landmark works. Students are expected to analyze film as an art form, a communications tool and an entertainment source. Cultural and sociological influences are considered, as well as the present and future directions of American cinema.


CINE 725 World Cinema This course examines issues of world cinema while questioning the notion of “national cinema” and exploring the social, cultural, political, economic and aesthetic cross-pollinations that mark European and non-western cinema. Students are expected to per- form close-readings of landmark films and to analyze the significance of historical context.


CINE 737 Graduate Seminar in Cinema Studies This seminar includes studies of the cinematic trends of a particular decade. Topics range from international films, Hollywood movies, and the various movements in cinema to the negotiation between the cultural, economic, and theoretical difficulties of current trans- national cinema. Prerequisite(s): CINE 705.


CINE 740 The New Hollywood In this interdisciplinary course, students make a critical inquiry into just how Hollywood works now, where it has been in the last 50 years and how the culture of Hollywood has morphed into its current form.


CINE 747 Issues in Cinema Theory In this course, students evaluate critical and historical issues in cinema and related screen media; topics vary and may include national and ethnic cinema, directors, genres, historical movements, and thematic studies.


CINE 788 Cinema Studies M.A. Thesis Students in the M.A. program in cinema studies are required to complete a thesis demonstrating original- ity of work, knowledge of the history, theories and methods in the discipline. Students must have topic approval from a faculty adviser and work under the close supervision of a faculty committee.


Computer Art (Undergraduate)


CMPA 100 Survey of Computer Art Applications Students are introduced to the basic use of computer principles from word processing to techniques sup- porting digital art and design. Students use a broad range of tool sets from a variety of industry-standard computer applications, which they may apply toward their major areas of study. The basic components of digital art and design tools—text, vector, raster, Web and page layout—are employed as learning concepts and serve as a digital foundation upon which their future studies may be built.


CMPA 110 Advanced Survey of Computer Art Applications This course is for students already well versed in the use of art and design computer applications. The course covers basic components of digital design tools including vector, raster, modeling language and anima- tion, culminating in the completion of a final project. Following an overview of HTML and Web page design, students create their own home pages.


CMPA 241 Survey of Electronic Art Chronicling the history of the computer as a visual art medium, this course details the vocabulary, tech- nique and theory on which contemporary practice is based. Course content addresses the origins of process advances and discoveries, the historical significance of SIGGRAPH and other current developments that impact the industry. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, CMPA 110.


Communications (Undergraduate)


COMM 105 Speech and Public Speaking This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and practices of public speaking. Topics include organization and communication skills that focus on audience analysis, topic selection, delivery styles, listening skills, critical thinking, argumentation, verbal and nonverbal skills, and the acquisition of academic resources.


COMM 110 Interpersonal Communication This course provides the opportunity for students to develop interpersonal communication skills, under- stand communication strategies and the interpersonal dynamic.


COMM 130 Introduction to Mass Communication This course introduces students to the nine types of media: broadcast TV, cable TV, radio, Internet, books, magazines, newspapers, sound recording and film. This course emphasizes the history of each of these media and explains the cultural impact of each. In addition, a focus is placed on media literacy and critical thinking. Prerequisite(s): COMM 105.


COMM 205 Intercultural Communication This course is designed to introduce students to the realities that cultural influences have on communica- tion practices, patterns and outcomes; to heighten their awareness and appreciation of the various ways that cultural differences can influence the quality of human interactions, and to help them become more effective communicators in an ever increasing cultur- ally pluralistic world. Prerequisite(s): COMM 105.


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