This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
students study major movements and theorists that have shaped various schools of criticism and the methods by which we read, understand, and respond to literature and other texts. Representative move- ments and critical perspectives may include Poetics, Formalism, Marxism, Queer Studies, Psychoanalysis, Race and Ethnic Studies, New Historicism, Feminism, Reader-response, Postcolonialism, Structuralism, Gen- der Studies, Cultural Studies, and Post-structuralism. To demonstrate their understanding of various critical the- ories, students apply theoretical models to the analysis of various texts. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 124, ENGL 145.


ENGL 363 Hardboiled: The Noir Literary Tradition Course readings focus on major writers who originated noir conventions such as the suspense-thriller plot, the femme fatale and the immobilized hero. Analyses of representative texts explore how the aesthetic arrange- ments of noir fiction engage contemporary social issues and offer incisive depictions of moral ambigu- ity, civic disorder and class conflict. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


English (Graduate)


ENGL 720 Literary Films How does the film narrative differ from a novel’s nar- rative? How does the aspect of time shape film versus literature? How does the camera do what the pen achieves? This course allows students to read, watch and compare great books that have become great and sometimes not-so-great movies.


ENGL 733 History of Rhetoric Through close reading of selected writers, students will investigate the history of rhetoric, exploring diverse definitions of rhetoric(s) and studying the theoretical practices in several contexts that include public and academic spaces. A sampling of rhetoricians could include Gloria Anzaldua, Aristotle, Mary Astell, James Berlin, Kenneth Burke, Edward P.J. Corbett, Jacques Derrida, Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza, Michel Foucault, Margaret Fuller, Susan Jarratt, Fredrich Nietzsche, Sojourner Truth, Giambattista Vico, and Richard Weaver.


Equestrian Studies (Undergraduate)


EQST 100 Fundamentals of Flat Work This course exists to provide the student with a clear understanding of how classical, elementary principles of flat work are critical for the proper training of both the horse and rider. Students will establish proper position, balance, control and the use of aids. Emphasis will be placed upon security, non-interference, and a developing understanding of the horse through basic schooling figures, pace and fundamental longitudinal and lateral exercises.


EQST 101 Developing the Horse’s Balance In this class, flat work skills will be further developed as students learn to strengthen the horse in accordance to his natural abilities. A better understanding of the concepts of contact, bending, transitions and improv- ing the horse’s balance will be emphasized. These elements are necessary as they increase rideability and promote good health and soundness. Students in this class will gain a better respect for the horse as an individual and learn to work with him rather than against him.


EQST 102 Advanced Flat Work Students will be exposed to a more intensive study of the art of riding. Each student should develop a heightened understanding of the relationship between the horse and rider and of how many of the physical problems and/or limitations of the horse can be traced back to incorrect riding. To benefit the horse’s further development, the student will utilize more advanced flat work techniques such as haunches in, haunches out, half-passes, flying changes and cantering on the counter lead. Riders in this class should be able to recognize and maintain true impulsion, contact and rhythm. Prerequisite(s): EQST 101.


EQST 103 Cavalletti, Gymnastics and Jumping Exercises I This course exists to bridge training theories and flat work learned in previous courses with the basic prin- ciples of jumping. Students will continue to develop their skills with regard to flat work as they seek to understand suppleness, rhythm, impulsion, straight- ness and contact. Cavalletti exercises, jumping grids and gymnastic exercises will be employed to learn how to influence and improve the horse’s way of going over the jumps and to promote the horse’s athletic develop- ment. Prerequisite(s): EQST 102.


EQST 104 Jumping Exercises II This course provides the student the opportunity to enhance the skills and concepts learned in Cavalletti, gymnastics and jumping exercises and apply them to more complex exercises that will lead to successful show ring riding. Students in this class will be exposed to a systematic program of riding lines, related dis- tances, bending lines, types and styles of jumps, and jumps set off the turns. They will further explore and learn to differentiate between hunters, jumpers and hunter seat equitation. Additionally, they will develop a sense of how to work with a horse’s abilities and decide which discipline best suits the horse as an individual. Prerequisite(s): EQST 103.


EQST 105 Riding the Show Hunter In this course, students will further develop their ability to ride, train and prepare horses for the hunter ring. With an understanding of the history and tradition behind riding hunters, students will explore more complicated schooling and conditioning techniques, different uses and varieties of individual jumps, lines and combinations. Students will learn to walk and analyze the courses with regard to footing and degree of difficulty to ensure that the horse’s performance is maximized. Prerequisite(s): EQST 104.


EQST 106 Concepts in Equitation Students in this class will explore the general require- ments and class routines that are necessary for riding in the hunter seat equitation divisions. Here the riders will concentrate on how to analyze and ride particular courses and learn how to properly execute additional tests. Skills will be further developed so that riders are competent and can positively influence the horse’s jumping style. Students will also develop a better understanding of style, balance and grace in this course. Prerequisite(s): EQST 104.


EQST 107 Riding the Show Jumper In this course, riders are introduced to the concepts of showing jumpers. Students become familiar with the strategies of and learn to differentiate between the tables that are employed in the USEF Jumper Divisions at recognized competitions, and learn about the elements of a jump-off course. More complicated courses are walked, analyzed and presented. Emphasis is placed on the use of track, pace and rhythm and on how various types of jumps and combinations of jumps influence the horse while on course. Prerequisite(s): EQST 104.


EQST 108 Advanced Concepts in Show Jumping Students continue to develop the concepts and skills learned in previous courses and further enhance them so that they can be incorporated into riding at the international level. A more effective position capable of influencing a horse’s effort off the ground and in the air is defined and refined. Students attempt to jump bigger, more substantial obstacles, ride more complicated courses with more technically difficult questions, and learn the necessary skills to effectively ride against the clock without becoming dangerous. The ability to turn well and jump safely from a variety of distances is emphasized. Students in this course are required to become familiar with the international (FEI) governing bodies and are expected to know and follow the rules and regulations for such competitions. Prerequisite(s): EQST 107.


EQST 109 Starting the Green Horse In this course, students will focus on starting a young horse properly and/or restarting a horse that has had


a shaky foundation. Although this is primarily a riding class, students may be asked to utilize various other training techniques and equipment such as lunging, long-lining, the European Walker and the round pen as deemed appropriate. The student will develop an understanding of when an individual horse is ready to progress and how to recognize signs that the train- ing may be going in the wrong direction. The horse’s physical and mental development will be explored as it relates to our ability to train them. Prerequisite(s): EQST 108.


EQST 110 Fundamentals of Horse Care This introductory course focuses on the care and maintenance of horses in a safe and secure environ- ment. Students acquire an overview of all fundamental aspects associated with the care and the provisions necessary for the equestrian professional. Fundamental skills including food and nutrition, proper use of equip- ment, and common preventative measures for equine ailments, are introduced.


EQST 115 Advanced Horse Care and Management This course introduces advanced horse care concepts including infectious disease control and emergency care. Students gain experience caring for horses as individuals and athletes with respect to their specific discipline orientation and prepare horses for the competition arena. Additionally, students are intro- duced to the concepts and principles of stable/herd management and record keeping. Proper assessment, response and management of emergency situations is emphasized. Prerequisite(s): EQST 110.


EQST 205 Principles and Theories of Riding and Training Horses Students receive a strong foundation of the basic theories of riding as well as the fundamental principles of horses in sport. In this lecture setting, students will discuss the evolution of the horse from “worker” to “athlete;” the aspects that horses are physically capable of doing such as longitudinal and lateral work, jumping, driving and dressage, and their strengths and weaknesses. Students will also explore the rider’s aids, position and balance, control and learning method- ologies as they relate to the horse and rider and the respective disciplines.


EQST 215 Principles and Applications of Training Horses Students will apply the practices of modern-day trainers and their techniques as well as the methods and use of various training tools and equipment. Emphasis will be placed upon working horses from the ground and learning to influence the horse through an increased understanding of the horse’s psychology and physiology. In addition, students will develop a personal philosophy toward training and will gain prac- tical experience in applying these principles through conditioning, timing, lunging, long-lining, working in the round pen and learning to start a young horse correctly. Prerequisite(s): EQST 205.


EQST 220 Barn Construction, Design and Facility Layout In this course, students explore the design and con- struction of barns, indoor and outdoor arenas, and other barn-related structures with attention given to the layout of an equine property and the proper use of available acreage as it relates to the goals of that facility and the needs of the horse. The course includes discussion of land selection, site consideration, topog- raphy and natural amenities, financial considerations, permits and building code regulation requirements, and potential environmental issues. In addition, stu- dents will gather a basic understanding of the various types of structures, materials, foundations, and fencing needs and options.


EQST 305 Principles of Equine Anatomy A thorough understanding of equine anatomy is crucial for the proper care and training of the performance horse. By examining the complex interaction of bones, muscle groups and internal organs in the equine athlete, students will understand the importance of maintaining the delicate balance of internal and


cour se descr ipt ions


273


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310  |  Page 311  |  Page 312  |  Page 313  |  Page 314  |  Page 315  |  Page 316  |  Page 317  |  Page 318  |  Page 319  |  Page 320  |  Page 321  |  Page 322  |  Page 323  |  Page 324  |  Page 325  |  Page 326  |  Page 327  |  Page 328  |  Page 329  |  Page 330  |  Page 331  |  Page 332  |  Page 333  |  Page 334  |  Page 335  |  Page 336  |  Page 337  |  Page 338  |  Page 339  |  Page 340  |  Page 341  |  Page 342  |  Page 343  |  Page 344  |  Page 345  |  Page 346  |  Page 347  |  Page 348  |  Page 349  |  Page 350  |  Page 351  |  Page 352  |  Page 353  |  Page 354  |  Page 355  |  Page 356  |  Page 357  |  Page 358  |  Page 359  |  Page 360  |  Page 361  |  Page 362  |  Page 363  |  Page 364  |  Page 365  |  Page 366  |  Page 367  |  Page 368  |  Page 369  |  Page 370  |  Page 371  |  Page 372  |  Page 373  |  Page 374  |  Page 375  |  Page 376  |  Page 377  |  Page 378  |  Page 379  |  Page 380  |  Page 381  |  Page 382  |  Page 383  |  Page 384
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com