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Spanish (Undergraduate)


SPAN 101 Spanish I This introductory course is designed for students who have not previously studied Spanish. The curriculum includes main patterns of grammar, conversation practice and written exercises.


SPAN 102 Spanish II Building on a base established in Spanish I, this course continues studies in Spanish grammar, conversation, composition and reading. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 101.


SPAN 103 Spanish III This course is designed to reinforce and extend stu- dents’ grammar and conversational skills and continues the advanced method of learning begun in Spanish II. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 102.


SPAN 201 Spanish IV This course focuses on translating authentic materi- als in art history or architectural history. Students will learn technical vocabulary, word order and structural organization of the Spanish language, and learn to discriminate among verb tenses and memorize fre- quently used words.


Design for Sustainability (Undergraduate)


SUST 290 Theories in Eco Stewardship Through a series of presentations, discussions, and short projects, students explore the current strategies and theories that form the basis for eco stewardship. Project topics include strategic mapping of an eco emphasized design process, and project planning with the goal of a closed system development. The understanding of the interconnectedness of the four E’s (ecology, economy, equality and education) will be the key point of this course.


SUST 308 Foundation of Sustainable Materials Students work in a highly interdisciplinary environ- ment, researching and analyzing sustainable materials as they pertain to the different disciplines. Through a series of lectures and exemplary projects, students will gain an understanding of the implications of the use of materials and the effects of their supply chains on the environment. Transportation and local production will be key components in solving current issues in manufacturing standards. Prerequisite(s): DRAW 100.


SUST 384 Design for Sustainability The concept of “green design” is introduced and integrated into design projects. Specific techniques, guidelines and examples are used to emphasize the practical aspects of green design. Valuable case stud- ies are included. While considering the profitability of the product, students are required to design in a way that benefits the global environment. Prerequisite(s): SUST 290.


Design for Sustainability (Graduate)


SUST 704 Applied Theories in Sustainability Defining an epistemological framework for under- standing the varied fields of expertise that inform the process of sustainable design is an essential first step in devising sustainable design strategies. Relevant specialties that are explored for their overarching synergy in this course include systems theory, social theory, ethics, critical inquiry, and creativity, as well as biomimicry, life cycle assessment and other sciences of the artificial.


SUST 708 Principles of Sustainable Materials Through a series of lectures and exemplary projects students learn about reusable and biodegradable materials and implications that have to be considered designing for a closed loop system. Students work in an interdisciplinary environment researching and analyzing sustainable materials as they pertain to the different disciplines. Evaluating the affect sustainable materials have on environment, economy and current standards of living applying material stewardship, the issue of transportation, as well as how to green the supply chain is a key component in the discussion of existing or to be developed sustainable materials.


SUST 713 Interdisciplinary Studio I Students work in an interdisciplinary environment creating products, buildings, environments, and or ser- vices applying sustainable methodologies in everyday matters. The concept of sustainability is introduced and integrated into the design and development processes across the disciplines involved. Specific techniques, guidelines and examples are used to emphasize the aspects of eco design strategies that meet today’s needs without compromising future generation’s needs. Students must consider global environmental impacts throughout the entire develop- ment process, and make suggestions for improvement if current technologies won’t allow for a truly sustain- able end product, building, environment or service yet. Prerequisite(s): SUST 704.


SUST 748 Design for Sustainability M.A. Final Project In this final studio, M.A. students apply all previously acquired skills to develop a truly sustainable prod- uct, building, environment, or service concept that addresses all aspects of the development process. Integrating a closed loop system and the understand- ing of the interdependence of the four E’s (Ecology, Economy, Equality, Education). With the collaboration of the supervising professor, students must demon- strate command of project planning, development and realization for the topic of their choice. Prerequisite(s): SUST 713.


Technical Direction (Undergraduate)


TECH 311 Digital Materials and Textures This course explores advanced concepts in materials and texturing as applied to the 3-D character model. The course explores material and texture application based on age, size, mobility and species, as determined by character environment, health and social character- istics. The course integrates information gleaned from reference materials into the 3-D world. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 250 or ITGM 240 or VSFX 210.


TECH 312 Advanced Application Scripting This course explores the use of MEL, Autodesk Maya’s embedded scripting language, Python and other modes of shell scripting, as tools for automating repeti- tive tasks, customizing the user experience, utilizing external data sources and extending the basic toolset with custom features. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 250 or ITGM 240 or VSFX 210.


TECH 316 Digital Lighting and Rendering Topics covered throughout this course include the practices of 3-D lighting design and rendering method- ology. Students develop lighting models and rendering solutions for 3-D scenes. Students study cinematog- raphy and practice the application of lighting theory in a 3-D environment. Students become familiar with lighting tools and basic shading technique, and seek to emulate believable lighting situations by using these tools. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 250 or ITGM 240 or VSFX 210.


TECH 326 Motion Capture Technology Students utilize motion capture hardware/software to collect data from a live actor, evaluate, edit, and export the data to a 3-D digital character. The course empha- sizes motion capture technology from the point of view of a technical director through managing, analyzing, importing and applying data as a structured process. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 250 or MOME 401 or ITGM 258 or VSFX 210.


TECH 420 Technical Direction for Compositing This course provides the foundation for students to produce complex composite images used in the animation, broadcast design, interactive, game and visual effects industries as and equips students with the technical, theoretical and conceptual skills required to combine moving images. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 240 or ANIM 250 or VSFX 210.


Television Producing (Undergraduate)


TELE 205 Television Field Production This course explores the many challenges in the process of preparation for the field production shoot. Students learn preproduction and production skills that will help them identify and problem-solve common production obstacles. Students working on projects in the field will obtain the knowledge and the experi- ence necessary to deliver programming to clients. Prerequisite(s): FILM 101, SNDS 201.


TELE 210 Television Studio Production This course simulates an actual multicamera studio production environment with students rotating crew positions in order to experience the requirements of each job, such as director, technical director, camera operator, etc. under actual working conditions. Stu- dents produce “live” and pre-taped programs in the studio utilizing a studio audience when appropriate. Prerequisite(s): FILM 101, SNDS 201.


TELE 241 Survey of Television This course introduces students to the development of television and its influence as a powerful, one-on- one medium. The student will learn how television has combined the elements of film, radio, and live perfor- mance into a dynamic and evolving form of global communication. The course will prepare students for entry into the non-linear world of television production by examining the transitional stages of television and through the production of relevant media exercises.


TELE 250 Live Event Production Students examine the challenges inherent to live event production. These venues include news, sports events, debates, awards ceremonies, concerts, and town-hall meetings. As part of the class curriculum, students will prepare and produce actual and staged events that help develop viable production skills. Prerequisite(s): TELE 205.


TELE 300 Line Producing The line producer is involved in both the creative and technical decisions of television programming, in both studio and field programs. Students in this course gain knowledge in all areas that are encountered in real world situations, including scheduling, budgeting, logistical and managerial skills, as well as determin- ing content as it is applied to television production. Prerequisite(s): TELE 205.


TELE 303 Segment Producing This class exposes students to a multi-media environ- ment requiring complex decision making under tight deadlines. Students explore the process of produc- ing short segments for tabloid-style programming through a series of simulated exercises and studio assignments involving producing content for overnight deadlines, on-location work, and live event coverage. Prerequisite(s): TELE 205.


TELE 350 Television Postproduction This course emphasizes both the technical and theo- retical aspects of editing various television formats, such as sporting events, news features, promos, and entertainment programming. The needs and audience expectations for each are analyzed and demonstrated along with delivery requirements of the client. Students will produce various editing projects in both field and studio contexts. Prerequisite(s): TELE 250.


TELE 450 Television Producing Field Internship I The field internship provides students with profes- sional, hands-on experiences in a working, active television production environment. This television station environment includes production of daily news programs, public affairs programs, promotional interstitials, commercials and other locally-produced programs both live and pre-recorded. Prerequisite(s): TELE 205.


TELE 451 Field Internship II The field internship provides students with profes- sional, hands-on experiences in a working, active television production environment. This television station environment includes production of daily


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