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services blueprints, architectures and the strategic mapping of touch-points that form service ecologies. Students are encouraged to develop design processes and methods that enable designers to iterate and ide- ate complete and whole service systems.


SERV 722 Critical Methods of Prototyping Services and Experiences An essential part of defining user-centric design ser- vices is the simulation of the anticipated experiences of those who deliver and use the service, including all points of contact during the service experience. Experience prototypes are used to do rapid service simulation involving customers, experts and clients in developing and refining the service. Students learn to develop customer service blueprints and the methods for exploring the (mainly) qualitative components dur- ing different experiences with the service. They explore new and novel ways of prototyping, describing and configuring user experiences. Prerequisite(s): SERV 711.


SERV 724 User-centered Design for Services This course examines user-centric design strate- gies to create interactions with systems that lead to positive and pleasurable experiences when engaged in accessing services. Students are taught about usability impact factors, heuristics and metrics used in assessing interfaces with a service paradigm. Students learn how to design interfaces that are intuitive, using activity-based and task-based approaches. This course provides students with knowledge of the physical, psychological and behavioral characteristics of humans and this information is applied to interaction design to develop usable, desirable and effective interactions leading to satisfying experiences. Prerequisite(s): SERV 722.


SERV 728 Service Design Studio I In this course, students work in an interdisciplinary environment creating services, products, interfaces and experiences within physical and virtual environ- ments. The practical methods and techniques of service design are developed and explored using a comprehensive design processes. Specific techniques, guidelines and examples are used to emphasize the practical aspects of service design where students are required to design in a way that is both user centric and socially and culturally appropriate. Students must consider the social, technological and economic con- siderations when designing services. Students research people and lifestyles, use and context, implementation and delivery, economy and commerce of services and the products, networks and environments which enable services to be delivered and experienced. Prerequisite(s): SERV 722.


SERV 753 Service, Innovation and Enterprise Students apply a broad range of skills to explore and experiment with new and innovative ways of deliver- ing and experiencing services. Students must consider specific sectors and commercial considerations in developing services, mindful of the wider social, technological and economic considerations. Students must engage in sustained and in-depth research of user behavior and context of use applying contextual research techniques in identifying opportunity for change. Students are encouraged to apply pleasure- based approaches in the design of services, exploring interface design issues and the importance of usability assessment methods in defining product platforms, touch-points and service architectures. Students dem- onstrate the formulation of personal design philosophy through their project work, which is evidenced through course project work. Prerequisite(s): SERV 728.


SERV 769 Service Design Studio II Students apply a broad range of skills to explore and experiment with new and innovative ways of deliver- ing and experiencing services. Students must consider specific sectors and commercial considerations in developing services, mindful of the wider social, technological and economic considerations. Students must engage in sustained and in-depth research of user behavior and context of use applying contextual research techniques in identifying opportunity for


change. Students are encouraged to apply pleasure- based approaches in the design of services, exploring interface design issues and the importance of usability assessment methods in defining product platforms, touch-points and service architectures. Students dem- onstrate the formulation of personal design philosophy through their project work, which is evidenced through course project work. Prerequisite(s): SERV 753.


SERV 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


SERV 779T Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


SERV 790 Service Design M. F. A. Thesis In this course, students prepare an original thesis that researches an area of their particular interest. The the- sis culminates in a written submission, in conjunction with a conclusive exhibition of research as applied to a specified product design. Prerequisite(s): SERV 769.


School of Film and Digital Media (Graduate)


SFDM 719 Media Theory and Application This course integrates historical studies, contemporary art as well as visual theory and practice in the study of early and current thought in media theory. Students are expected to analyze and conceptualize the mass media through active discussion in the classroom, research projects and independent analyses in order to stimulate critical thinking that can be applied to film and digital media. Theoretical methods and models are utilized to inform and develop student practice. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 701.


SFDM 721 Studio Business Practice Through articles, case studies and practical assign- ments and projects students will learn the business side of the media industry including the essentials for running a business or project. Students will learn about accounting, budgets, insurance, copyright and intellectual property law, management, and human resources. The course will culminate with a project in which students explain how they would run an assigned media job that requires use of all the areas of business covered during the course.


School of Fine Arts (Undergraduate)


SFIN 306 Digital Imaging for the World Wide Web Students are afforded the opportunity to communicate through the medium of photographs on the Web and obtain skills that have proven productive in the mar- ketplace. Emphasis is placed on acquiring Web design proficiency through appropriate use of software and image editing tools. Image formatting possibilities are investigated, along with aesthetic/functional aspects of site navigation, design, sequence and consistency. Prerequisite(s): CMPA 100.


SFIN 350 Special Topics in Fine Arts This elective course provides an opportunity for students to focus on particular issues in the field of fine arts. Faculty, course content and prerequisites vary each time the course is offered. The course may include lectures, discussions, individual projects and critiques, depending on the nature of the topic.


SFIN 412 Approaches in Contemporary Portraiture Students in the portrait arts minor must be able to portray the likeness of an individual; and yet, portrai- ture in the 21st century is far more than depiction of the portrait subject. Image mediation, scale, media and source material are several of the knowledge areas with which students of portraiture must be knowledgeable in both theory and practice. Prerequisite(s): PNTG 321 or SCPT 305.


SFIN 413 Professional Practices in Fine Arts The purpose of this course is to familiarize fine arts students with a variety of current professional prac- tices that prepare students for the business aspects of a fine arts career. The focus is on the preparation of the portfolio and résumé and on understanding business practices such as record keeping, contracts, shipping and copyright. Search strategies for jobs, galleries, grants and residencies are taught. A class project is completed, providing hands-on professional experience. Prerequisite(s): PNTG 302 or PRMK 404 or SCPT 420.


SFIN 431 Critique As Process By exploring international trends in contemporary art and design through a collaborative group critique environment, this course provides a stage for dialogue, collaboration and exchange of ideas among students of advanced standing. Reading assignments and essays are integral to the investigation of individual sources and studio processes. Prerequisite(s): ARLH 208 or ARTH 207, DSGN 102 or DRAW 101.


SFIN 432 Off-campus Studio Experience This studio course focuses on the production of an independent body of work for the student partici- pating in an off-campus program. Faculty members provide guidance in the progression of work as out- lined in a written studio proposal. The off-campus or residency experience is enhanced by studio exchanges with peers and critiques with visiting artists. The course culminates in visual documentation, a formal presentation and a written statement about the work. Prerequisite(s): ARLH 208 or ARTH 207, DSGN 102 or DRAW 101.


SFIN 444 School of Fine Arts Visiting Artist This course provides students in the School of Fine Arts the opportunity to study with a visiting artist. The course is organized around the conceptual and techni- cal specialties of the visiting artist and culminates with a collaborative class project. Through the development of ideas and professional practices of the visiting artist and through critiques, discussions, and written work, students work through assignments and projects to gain the understanding of the connections between idea, media, technique, scale, process and content in their individual work. Prerequisite(s): PNTG 302 or PRMK 301 or PRMK 306 or SCPT 320.


School of Fine Arts (Graduate)


SFIN 716 Theories and Processes I This course enlarges students’ critical vocabulary as well as their familiarity with current critical theory. Students will increase their understanding of the reciprocal relationship between the theoretical struc- ture of an artwork, and the processes that constitute its form. Students will begin to closely examine the theories and processes operating in their own work. All projects, critiques, writing assignments and discussions are designed to strengthen students’ respective work.


SFIN 731 Critique As Process in the Graduate Studio By exploring international trends in contemporary art and design through a collaborative group critique environment, this course provides a stage for dialogue, collaboration and exchange of ideas among students of graduate standing. Reading assignments and essays are integral to the investigation of individual sources and studio processes.


SFIN 732 Off-campus Graduate Studio Experience This studio course focuses on the production of an independent body of work for the graduate student participating in an off-campus program. Faculty members provide guidance in the progression of works as outlined in a written studio proposal. The off-campus or residency experience is enhanced by studio exchanges with peers and critiques with visiting artists. The course culminates in visual documenta- tion, a formal presentation and a written statement about the work.


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