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HIPR 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


HIPR 779T Graduate Teaching Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


HIPR 780 Special Topics in Historic Preservation This course examines topical issues in preservation. Issues vary from term to term. Prerequisite(s): Varies according to topic.


HIPR 791 Historic Preservation M.F.A. Thesis I This course serves as the first part of a two-course sequence dedicated to the development and produc- tion of the historic preservation thesis and the culmina- tion of the M.F.A. course of study. Following committee approval of the thesis proposal, research begins on the integral concerns of the thesis including problem definition, process inquiry, critical thinking synthesis and communication with the advice and guidance of faculty. Emphasis is placed on a high degree of complexity and challenge within the thesis project. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 765.


HIPR 792 Historic Preservation M.F.A. Thesis II This course serves as the second part of a two-course sequence dedicated to the development and produc- tion of a major historic preservation thesis as the culmination of the graduate student’s course of study. Students continue the thesis through the conventional phases of problem identification, research, synthesis and problem resolution. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 791.


Interaction Design (Undergraduate)


IACT 315 Human/Computer Interaction This course presents the principles of human/computer interaction. Students are expected to gain knowledge and expertise to contribute to the design process in computer-based, user-centered systems in which user and task needs are given primary importance. Students also evaluate the usability of interactive systems in fulfilling the requirements of their users. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 215.


IACT 317 Interactive Product Design This course focuses on the issues related to the aes- thetics of digital media within a nonlinear environment. Students are introduced to design problems in vari- ous disciplines through the use of current authoring techniques and technologies. Prerequisite(s): IACT 315 or MOME 206.


IACT 370 Information Architecture This course provides an overview of an important graphic and interaction design specialty and includes selected studio projects that emphasize visual problem solving. Students are expected to learn to translate complex data into clear, visually dynamic solutions. Types of data can include statistical content, repre- senting sequences that occur in space and time. This course complements study in topics of corporate com- munications systems, as well as publication, wayfinding and Web page design. Prerequisite(s): IACT 315.


IACT 375 Perceptual and Cognitive Human Factors This course explores the physical, psychological and behavioral characteristics of humans. Through a series of lectures and projects, this information is applied to interaction design to develop usable, desirable and effective products. The course builds on and applies theories and methods studied in Human/Computer Interaction. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 221.


IACT 435 Interaction Design Studio Students undertake work that presents complex interaction design problems and propose their own design briefs for a major piece of work. Design work is developed and prototypes are created within the


time frame of the class. The project offers students an opportunity to synthesize understanding and method in interaction design. Prerequisite(s): IACT 375. Interaction Design (Graduate)


IACT 701 Theory of Interaction Design This lecture-based course presents various readings from writers within the field of Interaction Design, and related disciplines. Material covered includes case studies, methodologies, and discourse relating to this complicated and highly theoretical field.


IACT 720 Interactive Product Design Process This class looks at the visionary, futuristic aspects of interactive products. These products can be both physical and digital. The class investigates the closing gap between the two embodiments and encourages a poetic, experiential attitude towards interactive product design. Prerequisite(s): IACT 701.


IACT 731 Information Architecture for Designers This course provides an overview of a graphic and interaction design subspecialty and includes selected studio projects that emphasize visual problem solving. Students learn to translate complex data into clear, visually dynamic solutions. Types of data include statistical content, representing sequences occurring in space and time. This course complements study in topics of corporate communication systems, as well as publication, way-finding and Web page design. Prerequisite(s): IACT 701.


IACT 733 Coding and Scripting for Interaction Designers Coding and Scripting for Interaction Designers pres- ents fundamental electronic commerce and com- munication technologies, as well as the basic building blocks for the development of complicated, interactive systems. This exposes students to the technological standards and programming languages, as well as the fundamentals of data structures, computing and networking. Prerequisite(s): IACT 720.


Industrial Design (Undergraduate)


IDUS 100 Introduction to Industrial Design This course introduces students to the industrial design profession. Lectures, discussions and problem solv- ing exercises explore industrial design as a creative process, examine its history and provide insight into professional opportunities in the field. Prerequisite(s): DSGN 102.


IDUS 160 Survey of Industrial Design In this course, students focus on the chronological con- text of the development of the industrial design pro- fession, relating it to the social, cultural and economic events that helped shape our modern day society. Studies are focused on major industrial designers and innovations. Prerequisite(s): DRAW 100.


IDUS 212 Model and Prototype Development This course introduces the use of hand tools and workshop equipment to develop rapid study mod- els and mid-fidelity prototypes related to industrial design. Students build study models of products to professional standards of accuracy and finish, with an emphasis on rapid development. All aspects of work- shop practice and safety are emphasized.


IDUS 213 Industrial Design Idea Visualization This course develops the drawing skills and 2-D pre- sentation techniques used to convey design ideas in the industrial design profession, including the rapid construction of perspective systems, the ability to sketch quickly and accurately, the use of basic line and weight methods to convey ideation rationale, and the visual representation of product assembly. Addition- ally, students will learn how to manipulate hand drawn sketches using computer software. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 100 or SERV 216.


IDUS 215 Contextual Research Methods This course presents the techniques necessary to conduct relevant and useful research of a novel domain in context. Students are expected to gain knowledge and expertise to contribute to the design process in


user-centered products and systems in which user, goals and task needs are given primary importance. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 101 or FIBR 101 or FURN 200 or GRDS 201 or IDUS 100 or INDS 102 or SERV 216.


IDUS 221 Human Factors in Industrial Design This course explores the physical, psychological, perceptual and behavioral characteristics of humans. Through a series of lectures and projects, this infor- mation is applied to the field of industrial design to develop safe and effective products. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 213, IDUS 215.


IDUS 250 The Development of Product Form A sequence of short projects provides students with an opportunity to investigate the design issues associ- ated with familiar mass-produced products and to gain an understanding of design methodology. Projects are developed to enhance working knowledge of the importance of form, and the impact and relevance of visual and physical design decisions. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 213, IDUS 215.


IDUS 312 Manufacturing and Assembly Technology This course emphasizes the practical relationship between industrial design and the manufacturing industry as well as the technical considerations that influence the choice of material and process for small batch and mass production. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 213, IDUS 215.


IDUS 313 Computer Modeling This course applies design-based simulation and 3-D modeling to the industrial design process. State- of-the-art software is used as a modeling tool, and computer graphics are used as a communication tool for newly developed products. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 213, IDUS 215.


IDUS 316 Portfolio and Résumé Development Students begin to structure their industrial design projects into a cohesive and formal portfolio of work, preparing them for internship and employment oppor- tunities. Emphasis is placed on interviewing skills, portfolio preparation, and presentation refinement. At the end of this course students formally present the majority of their industrial design work in a structured critique to multiple faculty evaluators. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 250 or SERV 216.


IDUS 320 Design for Emergent Markets Students are introduced to the design issues relat- ing to product development and manufacture in markets without a mature mass production culture or infrastructure and markets that are developing their industrial base. Students produce designs for specific geographic regions, with an emphasis on current industry strategies. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 312, IDUS 313.


IDUS 321 Industrial Design in the Marketplace Through a sequence of design projects, students are required to consider more complex design issues and their corresponding problems. Students work through the product development cycle, and, while they are expected to apply their project skills and technical knowledge to formulate design solutions that are both visually appealing and functional, they also focus on the skills necessary to communicate ideas to engineers, marketing and other stakeholders. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 312, IDUS 313.


IDUS 325 Emerging Manufacturing Materials Students examine innovative trends in manufacturing methods and materials via lectures, studio assignments and research. Techniques for discovering, analyzing, and identifying potential applications for these new methods and materials are presented. Students explore various sources for innovative technology, including organizations such as NASA, NSF, ASM and University Research Centers. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 312, IDUS 313.


IDUS 355 Sensory Awareness Humans perceive their environments with all of the senses. This course seeks to incorporate that under- standing into the design process to provide an under- standing of the sensory nature of products and their environments as a whole. Through a sequence of


cour se descr ipt ions


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