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the post-World War II history of installation art, lead- ing to the artistic move outside and into the natural landscape (a divergent tradition from historical public sculpture). Additionally, discussion focuses on the strong relationship that exists between architectural conceptualization and the notions underscoring these forms. In particular, these sculptural works are examined as representing a consequence, corollary, reaction or response to architecture and the landscape. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 207.


ARTH 347 Great Masters’ Materials and Techniques This course delves below the surface to explore the physical character of paintings, manuscripts and stained-glass windows by northern and southern European artists from 1100 to 1600. Antique treatises and recipe books regarding artists’ materials and techniques are studied. Emphasis is placed on how and with what artists created works of art, with recent results of the scientific examination of art providing substantial basis for insights. Conservation issues are also considered in light of new studies in this field. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 348 British Portraiture Using the resources of the college’s Earle W. Newton Center for British and American Arts, British portrai- ture from the Renaissance to the early 20th century are examined. Course lectures focus on content, style and technique of work that is directly observable in the collection, and explores the context and role of portraiture in British society. Prerequisite(s): Any 200- level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 350 Survey of Women in Art This course surveys women’s involvement in and rela- tionship to the visual arts from antiquity through post- modernism. Study focuses on the factors involved in women’s access to artistic production and their major contributions to the history of art. Students are encour- aged to consider the historical reality of women’s participation in art and architecture through the ages. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 351 Native American Art I This course is part of an investigation of the artistic traditions of native North America. Regions studied include the prehistoric Eastern Woodlands, historic Southeast, Northeast, Sub-Arctic, Arctic and North- west Coast. Discussions are concerned primarily with content, context, style, technique and the role of art in these diverse cultures. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 354 Survey of African-American Art This course comprehensively surveys the birth, growth and maturation of African-American art from the arts and crafts of the era of slave trade to the contemporary Postmodernist art styles. The course has therefore been designed/structured to grant students an insight to the history, production and evolution of African- American cultural traditions from the time of their detachment from Africa to their transplantation and attachment to the Euro-American culture. Considering the multiracial/ multicultural nature of the African- American essence and therefore the diversity found in their arts and culture, the course content focuses on establishing the places of the different cultural environments, the socio-cultural relationships and the impacts of socio-political elements on the formation of the “philosophy” of African- American art and culture, as well as the conception and production of resultant artworks. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.


ARTH 356 Digital Art and Culture This course examines the use of digital technology in art history and visual culture and provides a frame- work to discuss prevailing theoretical issues. Students explore the practice of digital art on a global level and are introduced to the relevant concepts involved in the discourse. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ ARTH course.


ARTH 357 Greek Art and Archaeology This course examines the principal monuments of Greek art and archaeology. Works of painting,


sculpture and architecture are discussed in terms of style, meaning and social context. The course provides a basic understanding of the so-called “cradle” of Western civilization and its influence on later Western art. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 358 Roman Art and Archaeology This course examines the principal monuments of the Roman world and some of the archaeological practices that have brought them to light. Painting, sculpture, architecture and material culture in general are con- sidered, as they reflect social, political and aesthetic attitudes in the ancient world. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 361 Native American Art II This course is part of an introduction to the artistic traditions of native North America. Regions studied in this course include the Northwest Coast, plateau, Great Plains, Great Basin, California and the American Southwest. Discussions are primarily concerned with content, context, style, technique and the role of art in these diverse cultures. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 365 World Rock Art Rock paintings or rock carvings from around the world are a record of people connecting meaning and place. Topics to be discussed would include site studies from Paleolithic Europe, Neolithic Africa, North America and Australia, as well as consideration of contemporary methodologies and issues in the field, with particular emphasis on site preservation and management. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.


ARTH 367 18th-century English Art and Design Painting, sculpture, design, landscape and architecture are examined within the context of an English Geor- gian society that variously placed an emphasis on polite society, class distinction, the study of classical art and culture, nature, commerce and the romantic. Individual works are studied within the larger con- text of the patron’s and maker’s physical, social and psychological milieus. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ ARTH course.


ARTH 368 British Modernism British art in the early half of the twentieth century was predicated upon an ambivalent relationship with Modernism. The dominant English tradition in art, associated with romantic individualism, empiricism and the importance of literary and allegorical subject matter was at odds with the aims of European mod- ernism. A corresponding issue is the way in which the discourse of British art has created a particular kind of division between figurative artists, often deemed eccentric and conservative, and those who engaged with the socio-political aspects of Continental modern- ism. Alternatively, this course traces the genealogy of British modernism thematically, discussing the significance of rural revivalism, formalism, futurism, primitivism, abstraction, and surrealism as central to its manifestation. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ ARTH course.


ARTH 369 Russian Modernism The history of modern Russian art is the product of the same discourses that defined all Western modernist movements. Through the study of Russian painting, sculpture, architecture, film and theatrical settings, this course addresses fundamental issues that are raised in an examination of modernism in any national context. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 372 French Impressionism This course explores ideas and images pertinent to French Impressionism. Its objective is to increase stu- dents’ knowledge of French Impressionist art and to equip students with standard research methodologies employed for art historical analyses at their differing stages in professional development. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123, ARTH 110, and ARTH 205 or ARTH 207.


ARTH 373 New York as an Art Capital of the World Europeans acknowledged the status of the visual arts in New York only after World War II. This recogni- tion was partly due to the new museums that were


founded after the 1920s: The Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum and the Guggenheim. Students in this course visit all of these museums, in addition to more recently founded institutions and current gal- leries of the 57th Street and Madison Avenue areas. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 374 African Art: Beyond the Object This course is an introduction to the traditional art of Africa. The course explores the rich and “exotic” cultural traditions of African peoples outside the influ- ence of Euro-American cultures. The class focuses on developing an appreciation of other cultures and exploring their limitless potentials to work with West- ern cultures in the spirit of reciprocity. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 375 Art and Architecture of 16th-century Italy Michelangelo’s heroic masterpieces reflect many of the contradictions represented by Italian artists during the 16th century. This course focuses on developments in artistic theory and design that enlighten and explain the dramatic intensity and stylistic changes from the grandeur of High Renaissance art to the complexities presented by the Mannerists. Works of principal paint- ers and sculptors of the period are studied: the Vene- tian masters Titian and Tintoretto, the Florentine mas- ters Bronzino and Rosso, and others. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.


ARTH 378 Masterpieces in English Collections Students explore the visual wealth of the great English collections. In particular, the course focuses on the National Gallery, the British Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Courtauld Institute in London. Students view works from the Parthenon sculptures, medieval treasures, Old Master paintings by Jan Van Eyck, Leonardo, Titian, works by English artists such as John Constable and a host of non-western treasures. The great English passion for collecting is explored in great country houses. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.


ARTH 380 Northern Renaissance Art This course covers the great artistic achievements and the diverse social conditions north of the Alps from approximately 1350-1575. The role that the church and nobility played in the invention and development of oil painting is studied, as well as the role prints played in creating the unprecedented spread of information, leading to an awareness of classicism and playing a significant role in the Reformation. The technical development of prints and the importance of religious sculpture also is studied. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARTH class.


ARTH 381 Italian Renaissance Art This course examines Italian art and architecture from the early 14th to the middle 16th century. The content and the context of the artworks, their form and func- tion, and the lives of the artists and architects who produced them, are given special emphasis. Questions of patronage and the influence of humanism as seen through classical and contemporary literature are examined. The differences in regional styles are criti- cally analyzed. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ ARTH course.


ARTH 383 Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture of Mesoamerica This course explores the art and architecture of the major civilizations of Mesoamerica, including the Olmec, Teotihuacanos, Toltec, Mixtec, Zapotec, Aztec and Mayan peoples. Major architectural monuments dating from 1200 B.C. to 1520 A.D., sculpture, paint- ing, manuscripts, fiber arts, ceramics and metalwork are discussed in terms of content, historical and social context, style, form and the role of art in their respec- tive cultures. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ ARTH course.


ARTH 385 Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture of Peru This course explores the art and architecture of the major civilizations of Peru. Major architectural monu- ments dating from 2700 B.C. to 1532 A.D., sculpture,


cour se descr ipt ions


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