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and how the traditions remain vital. Students will also encounter visual and musical adaptations of the mate- rial. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 145 World Masterpieces Selected writings from Asia, Greece, Rome and medi- eval Europe form the basis for study in this course. Students read and interpret different forms of poetry, drama and prose; relate the literature to the culture and age in which it was produced; and discuss trends in world literature through various time periods. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 148 Psychological Realism in Literature This course focuses on the writings of Henry James, William Faulkner, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf and Djuna Barnes. Through readings, discussions and written assignments, students identify and describe specific structural characteristics used in psychologi- cal realism. Students are also expected to identify and describe the usage of these characteristics through literary analysis. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 155 Literature By Women This course examines the works of women writers from diverse backgrounds and cultures and analyzes the influences on their lives. Traditional women’s roles are explored and compared to more contemporary roles. Writers include Virginia Woolf, Toni Morrison, Dorothy Allison, Amy Tan, Eudora Welty and Alice Walker. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 161 Modern and Contemporary American Poetry Through the study of modern and contemporary poetics, students experience the various offerings of American poetry, from the first inklings of mod- ern experiment in Walt Whitman’s work through to the contemporary poems of Collins. Students will gain an understanding of the legacy of the poetics, politics, and social conscience of the past and how it influences contemporary poetry and social culture. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 166 African-American Literature This course introduces students to African-American literature and culture through autobiographies, novels, short stories, poetry, plays and supplementary audiovi- sual materials. Students are expected to use their ana- lytical skills to write short critical response papers and discuss the assigned texts. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 167 American Realists and Naturalists: 1850-1900 This course examines writers’ responses to nature, urbanization and the Industrial Revolution by ana- lyzing the changing view of human nature during these years. The study of Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, William Dean Howells, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson introduces students to the great American fiction writers, poets and essayists of the second half of the 19th century. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 168 American Moderns: 1900-1945 This course examines the wealth of creativity in Ameri- can letters during the early 20th century. Authors may include Kate Chopin, Sherwood Anderson, Sinclair Lewis, Henry James, Theodore Dreiser, Willa Cather, T.S. Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Djuna Barnes and others. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 169 Today’s Classics: 1945-Present This course examines the powerful array of great writ- ing in the latter part of the 20th century. Authors may include Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Hawkes, John Barth, E.L. Doctorow, Anne Tyler, Flannery O’Connor, Thomas Berger, Thomas Pynchon, John Updike, Eudora Welty, James Dickey, Tennessee Williams, Sam Shepard, Donald Barthelme, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Walker Percy, Joan Didion, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller and Bernard Malamud. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 170 Satire in Great Literature From Jonathan Swift’s A Modest Proposal in 1729 to the present, writers have employed satire as the weapon of choice in making social statements. This course examines writers such as Swift, Alexander Pope, Mark Twain, Sinclair Lewis, George Orwell, James Thurber, Flannery O’Connor, Joseph Heller, Kurt Von- negut, Douglas Adams, Thomas Pynchon, Tom Wolfe, T.R. Pearson, Edward Albee and Samuel Beckett. In addition, satirists such as cartoonists from The New Yorker and sequential artists such as Gary Trudeau may be discussed. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 171 World Mythology This course introduces students to the major issues, literature and art of world mythologies, with a primary focus on what is termed “classical mythology.” In addi- tion to Greek and Roman myths, the course content includes tales and legends from Asia, North and South America, Australia and Africa. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 176 Classics of Science Fiction This course introduces several classic texts and films in the science fiction genre. Emphasis is given to the social and historical contexts in which the genre has evolved. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 179 French Literature French literature of the 19th and 20th centuries is the focus of this course. Readings and class discussions center on definitions and techniques of literary genres, literary movements, and historical events in France as well as the contributions of specific French writers. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 180 Writing Fundamentals for Screen and Stage Artists working in areas including film, performing art, animation and sequential art rely on narrative writing as a means to develop plot, character and story. This course is designed to provide students with exposure to various types of narrative literature, as well as appropriate software applications to write narratives for screen and stage so that students can master the fundamental mechanics and structure of screenwriting, playwriting and other narrative works. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 186 Hispanic Literature This course centers on Latin American/Hispanic lit- erature in the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings and class discussions focus on definitions and techniques of literary genres, literary movements and historical events of Spain and Spanish America, and the inno- vations and contributions of individual Spanish and Spanish- American writers. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 188 Asian-American Literature Using an interdisciplinary approach, students explore the wealth of Asian-American literature through required readings, multimedia materials, and selected social, cultural and historical writings. Students engage in class discussions and critical writings to gain a better understanding of Asian-American literature. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 193 Composition for International Students Intended for non-English speakers, this course exam- ines written exposition and communication. Assign- ments include analyzing and composing essays and implementing research skills.


ENGL 212 British Literature Since 1920 This course emphasizes literature of Great Britain since 1920, focusing on writers of all genres generally associ- ated with Modernism and Postmodernism. Students will acquire knowledge about narrative techniques, especially those that have influenced storytelling today. Themes often employed by selected writers, such as colonialism, absurdism and pessimism, are discussed. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 220 Victorian Literature The Victorian era was a time of firsts (first photo- graph, mystery novel, mass-produced illustration) as well as great social change. This course examines


the representations of these social and cultural phe- nomena through discussion of writers including John Ruskin, Alfred Tennyson, T.S. Eliot and Rudyard Kipling. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 235 Detective Narratives This course will focus on the genre of the detective narrative and trace its history by examining important examples from the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Students will read works by Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, Raymond Chandler, Agatha Christie, Dahiell Hammett, Walter Mosley, and Ed McBain, and study films, television and radio programs, comic books, graphic novels, and games in order to develop a fuller understanding of fictional detectives and crime detection. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 242 The Absurdist Imagination This course explores the work of continental and expatriate writers and dramatists whose work chal- lenges accepted conventions. Writers such as Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, James Joyce, Albert Camus, Thomas Bernhard and Donald Bar- thelme—together with dramatists in the convention of the Theater of the Absurd (such as Eugene Ionesco, Luigi Pirandello, Samuel Beckett, Tom Stoppard)--are studied. Students are encouraged to make connections between artists of the written word and painters in the Dadaist and Surrealist traditions. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 207.


ENGL 278 Angelheaded Hipsters: The Beat Writers Students read and analyze the works of major Beat writers such as Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs, along with other significant con- tributors. In addition, students explore how the Beats integrated influences from the visual arts, Buddhism and jazz into their writings. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 280 Caribbean Literature in English This course introduces students to some of the major voices in the Caribbean literary canon written in Eng- lish. Accessing multiple genres, students will explore the various representations of Caribbean people and places in terms of ethnicity, race, gender, and social, political and economic histories. The fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction works of Caribbean writers will enable students to experience the means by which writers from the Caribbean participate in shaping not only their worldview(s) but also the per- ceptions of those looking into the Caribbean space. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 300 Literary Autobiographies Writers’ autobiographies reflect a broad range of back- grounds and reveal much about the creative process itself. Students can determine what social, political and cultural issues have either helped or hindered the creative process. Write-alike exercises will enable students to construct their own autobiographies in a literary and authentic way. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 302 Greek and Roman Drama This course will examine the culture of Ancient Greece with respect to the birth of Western drama. Selected tragedies and comedies are studied and analyzed. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 310 Modern European Drama 1870–1920 Students study the writers, works and aesthetic move- ments that shaped modern drama from 1870 to 1920. Writers and works are examined in their historical and cultural contexts, and their influences on subsequent drama are investigated. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 320 Literary Films This course examines how film narrative differs from a novel’s narrative. In particular, the course considers how the aspect of time shapes the construction of both narrative forms. Students explore how the camera rein- terprets what the pen achieves. Students read, watch and compare great books that have been re-envisioned in filmic narrative. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


ENGL 340 History of Literary Theory and Criticism Within an overview of the history of literary criti- cism from ancient Greece to the twenty-first century,


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