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previous coursework by interpreting the concept of multiples with their studio work. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 708.


MTJW 739 Theory and Criticism for Metals and Jewelry Students undertake readings in contemporary and historical philosophy that address concept and design in jewelry and metal objects. Classes focus on critical dialogue that analyzes contemporary issues pertinent to the metals and jewelry field. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 701, MTJW 702.


MTJW 749 Metals and Jewelry M.A. Final Project In this course, M.A. students develop professional competence in a specialized area of metals and jewelry by exploring and completing a creative project. The course channels each student’s graduate coursework into a cohesive project that can be applied to profes- sional goals. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 708.


MTJW 755 Integrated Solutions for Metals and Jewelry This course provides transition into the graduate thesis proposal. Students complete studio work that demonstrates technical proficiency integrated into and compatible with the concept pursued. Presentation, discussion and critique support the development of individual interests. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 731.


MTJW 765 Metals and Jewelry Applied Theory and Practice Students conduct in-depth research on a metals and jewelry topic that reflects their particular areas of inter- est. Conducting research, preparing preliminary work and proposing a thesis is the focus. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 702, MTJW 755.


MTJW 770 Professional Development in Metals and Jewelry This course provides business strategies and legal issues within the field of art and design. Students define appropriate strategies for self-promotion that complement their professional vision. This course cul- minates in the effective presentation of student work. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 765.


MTJW 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


MTJW 779T Graduate Teaching Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


MTJW 780 Special Topics in Metals and Jewelry This course provides an opportunity for students to focus on particular issues in the field or to study advanced techniques and processes. Faculty, course content and prerequisites vary each time the course is offered. The course may include lectures, discussions, individual projects and critiques, depending on the nature of the topic.


MTJW 790 Metals and Jewelry M.F.A. Thesis This course is the culmination of a M.F.A. in Metals and Jewelry. Students are required to develop a profes- sional collection of contemporary original work that demonstrates a critical expertise of the field. A written component rationalizing the relevance of the body of work is required. Students produce an exhibit in which their work and written component are presented. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 765.


Music (Undergraduate)


MUSC 101 Music Appreciation This course provides an introduction to the art of music listening and musical principles. A wide variety of musical literature is introduced ranging from classical music, theater and film, to jazz and popular music. The main focus of this course is to provide students with broad-based musical knowledge to form the founda- tion for musical listening skills and music theory. This


course functions as the introductory course for the music performance minor as well as a general educa- tion elective for all students.


MUSC 130 World Music An introduction to the music of the world’s peoples, this course studies music outside of the traditions of Western music and within its cultural context. A variety of music will be studied including music from Africa, India and Japan. Musical elements such as melody, harmony, rhythm, tone colors, form and analysis will be applied to music study through listening and aural exercises, written papers, class presentation and group discussion.


MUSC 140 Music Theory This course is designed for all students pursuing careers in which music plays a vital role. The course focuses on the fundamentals of music: notation, rhythm, scales, tonality, keys and modes, intervals, transposition and chords. Rhythmic, harmonic and melodic principles are investigated through a variety of individual and group activities including written and aural exercises.


MUSC 240 Music Composition This course directly applies fundamental music theory skills towards musical composition. The course includes a variety of assignments and exercises to further develop written and aural musical skills including aural ear training exercises, analysis of previously composed works and completion of short written composition exercises. Singing and/or instrumental experience is assumed as well as a strong interest in composition. Prerequisite(s): MUSC 140.


Museum Studies (Undergraduate)


MUSM 201 Introduction to Museum Principles and Methods This course introduces the student to the history, phi- losophy and role of museums and collecting in society. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110.


MUSM 301 Museum Administration This survey of museum organization and administration includes governance, policies, ethics, marketing and public relations, and funding and financial structures. Prerequisite(s): MUSM 201.


MUSM 302 Museum Curation and Collection Management This study of the principles and methods of acquisition examines documentation, maintenance and utilization of collections, and aspects of special exhibitions includ- ing registration, cataloging, collection policies, con- servation and scholarship. Prerequisite(s): MUSM 201.


MUSM 303 Museum Education This study of the role of museums as educational institutions includes interpreting permanent collec- tions, creating catalogs and other written and visual educational adjuncts, developing special exhibitions, lecturing, touring, managing volunteers and develop- ing community outreach programs. Prerequisite(s): MUSM 201.


MUSM 304 Museum Conservation This course examines the handling and care of a vari- ety of museum objects, including those on display, in transit or in storage. Conservation practices related to cleaning and restoration, climate control, light levels and photography are also explored. Prerequisite(s): MUSM 201.


Museum Studies (Graduate)


MUSM 751 Museum Administration Administration is an essential element of professional practice in the museum world. In this course, gradu- ate students critically evaluate leadership positions in a variety of museum settings, by considering the problematic relationship between artistic and manage- ment concerns. Exposure to the challenges and con- frontations of running the museum are encountered by graduate students who meet professionals in a variety of local museums and on field trips to discuss the issues facing their profession.


MUSM 752 Museum Conservation Art conservation involves developing a critical eye of object analysis and an in-depth understanding of the historical implications behind the materials and techniques of art and architectural monuments. This course provides an overview of conservation theory, various scientific approaches and controversial issues.


MUSM 753 Museum Education Education is an essential element of professional prac- tice in the museum world. This course explores the role of museums as educational institutions through the interpretation of the permanent collection and special exhibitions including the creation of catalogues and other written and visual educational adjuncts, lecturing, touring, management of volunteers, and the develop- ment of community outreach programs.


MUSM 754 Museum Curation and Collections This course examines the history and theory of the role of the curator in a museological context. Elements of daily organization and maintenance of the collections are discussed. Students are exposed to the creativity involved in long-term collection development and its presentation through exhibitions.


Musical Studio (Undergraduate)


MUST 103 Introduction to String Playing This performance course is for beginning musicians in violin, viola and cello. The course covers the fundamen- tals of playing the instrument, reading music, compos- ing music and conducting through various activities such as orchestra class, small group lessons, concert performance, recitals and concert attendance. Stu- dents are required to own or rent a musical instrument.


MUST 220 Sight Singing The art of singing at sight is essential for all students pursuing careers in which music plays a vital role and is an important skill in the pursuit of a professional level of musicianship. This course applies the funda- mentals of music theory to developing a “hearing eye”, the ability to look at music and determine from sight alone how it will sound. Rhythmic and pitch exercises are investigated systematically starting with simple to compound meters and major to minor keys and modes. Both Solfège and Scale Degree systems are employed, and class activities include a variety of aural and written exercises. No vocal training is required and exercises are limited to a one-octave range. Prerequisite(s): MUSC 140.


MUST 260 Musical Theater Repertoire I This course introduces students to the skills necessary to craft an interpretation of the songs that fall within the repertoire of American musical theater. The course is highly experiential, and students are expected to integrate the material through a series of in-class per- formances. Students are exposed to an extensive rep- ertoire of musical theater and begin to build a portfolio of songs that has range, is personal and is thus suitable for auditions. Through examples and analysis, students learn to experience singing in a discerning manner and with a critical ear. Prerequisite(s): MUST 220.


MUST 333 Instrumental Chamber Music


This course is designed for musicians with a high level of performance skill, as well as a strong foundation in music theory studies and the ability to read music at an advanced level. The main focus of this course is to further develop ensemble skills and rehearsal techniques that lead to a greater understanding of music and successful musical performances. Students participate in rehearsals in a master class setting. They also participate in musical score analysis, musical transcription writing, effective communication, and a variety of ensemble performances. Prerequisites: By audition only.


MUST 350 Vocal Genre Performance I This course provides the place for vocal performance students of varying interests such as cabaret, record- ing, voice-over, and performance art to research their particular interest and create a performance or recording; learn how to research performance styles


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