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the relationship of the visual image to the narrative. It is essential that students understand and analyze the vital relationship between graphics and text as they relate to the visual narrative. Page layout, panel design, and the relationship of images combined with the written word are among the disciplines covered in the class.


SEQA 503 Sequential Art Production Methods Any story, no matter how carefully conceived, requires an understanding of production processes. Creating static narrative art not only requires a fine imagina- tion and an understanding of basic storytelling, but a mastery of the technical aspects of presenting the story. This course explores a variety of processes and techniques used to produce visual narrative from thumbnails to pre-press. Students in this course are taught traditional and digital approaches to penciling, inking, lettering and coloring. Additionally, students will learn to prepare sequential art for both print and web delivery.


SEQA 701 Theories and Practices for Sequential Art In this course, students study sequential art theory, history, and industry. Using studio projects aligned with specific theories and concepts, students view their own work within the context of contemporary sequential art. This course includes directed and independent projects, research presentations, critical writing, and the discussion and analysis of industry trends.


SEQA 707 Drawing for Sequential Art This course is primarily an observational drawing class for sequential art students. Using a number of primary references, students are expected to analyze and rep- resent the 3-D world in 2-D in a way that is relevant to their discipline.


SEQA 712 Concept Design in Sequential Art This course is a comprehensive exploration of charac- ters, themes, and environments of their own creation.


SEQA 716 Sequential Art Studio I Students propose a series of sequential art problems in a particular area of interest. Emphasis is on the advancement of marketable techniques, style and personal solutions through a series of related proj- ects. Students are free to experiment with different techniques and subject matter, and are expected to plan and carry out a project from story conception to completion. Group instruction and critiques are included. Prerequisite(s): SEQA 701.


SEQA 717 Exploring the Narrative This course is designed to help students identify and explore the formal aspects of traditional narratives. By examining narratives in various media (literature, fables, film, video, plays), students are provided with preparation to create their own stories.


SEQA 726 Sequential Art Studio II Students continue to explore issues in sequential art, working on individual, self-directed projects, and par- ticipating in group discussions and critiques. Empha- sis is on advancement of individual studio projects. Prerequisite(s): SEQA 716.


SEQA 731 Digital Design Issues in Sequential Art This course focuses on digital design, prepress and printing as they pertain to sequential art. There are rel- evant assignments, discussions and critiques of print, Web, and prepress in the digital realm. Prerequisite(s): SEQA 716.


SEQA 741 Inking Techniques This course is designed to familiarize students with all of the inking tools and techniques employed by professional comic book artist and inkers. Students will gain the ability to work in a wide range of styles and emphasis is placed on developing a personal approach to inking. Both individual and group critiques support the projects.


SEQA 745 Writing for Sequential Art This course focuses on the necessity for sequential artists to be competent writers as well as artists. The course covers all phases of writing for sequential art, including scripting in various styles, constructing plot


synopses, submitting proposals to publishers and generating story ideas in various genres of sequential art. The course is designed to give students the writing skills necessary to work professionally in the world of sequential art.


SEQA 749 Sequential Art M.A. Final Project All M.A. students in sequential art are required to develop and produce a substantial professional-level portfolio that integrates all the skills and knowl- edge acquired throughout the program. Students are instructed about how to construct a portfolio and effectively market themselves. Attention is given to tailoring portfolios to specific sequential art markets including comics, graphic novels, cartooning, story- boarding, animation, children’s books and/or digital game design. Prerequisite(s): SEQA 716.


SEQA 756 Sequential Art Studio III This studio course further advances students’ abilities to address issues and arrive at self-directed solu- tions to sequential art problems. The course involves individual studio projects, class discussion, and group critiques.


SEQA 766 Sequential Art Studio IV Students conclude the Sequential Art Studio sequence as they refine their problem-solving skills with the development of a marketable technique and a per- sonal vision and style. Independent work on projects of particular interest produces a range of work that is of professional, portfolio-level quality. Prerequisite(s): SEQA 756.


SEQA 768 Figure Drawing This course is a traditional life drawing class for sequential art graduate students. Using the human figure as a primary reference, students are expected to analyze and represent the human form in a man- ner that is relevant to their discipline. Prerequisite(s): SEQA 707.


SEQA 770 Sequential Art Self-promotion This course explores the many avenues open to illus- trators who wish to work in the field of sequential art. Students examine how to advertise and promote them- selves through projects such as portfolio preparation, printed self-promotional pieces and personal logos. Prerequisite(s): SEQA 726.


SEQA 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


SEQA 779T Graduate Teaching Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


SEQA 780 Special Topics in Sequential Art This course examines topical issues in sequential art. Issues vary from term to term.


SEQA 790 Sequential Art M.F.A. Thesis All M.F.A. students in sequential art must develop and prepare an original exhibition, with an accompanying written component.


Service Design (Undergraduate)


SERV 216 Service Blueprinting Service blueprinting is described as the mapping out of a service journey identifying the processes that constitute the service, isolating possible fail points and establishing the time frame for the journey. Students will learn how a service blueprint can be used by both business process managers, designers and software engineers during development. Service blueprints can be used as a guide to service managers who operate services on a day-to-day basis. Students will learn how to map and sequence events sometimes called ‘use-cases’ or ‘flows’ to identify user actions, service responses and the touch points and interactions that enable the service experience to be user-centered. Prerequisite(s): COMM 105, DSGN 115, ENGL 123.


SERV 311 Service Architectures, Ecologies and Touch Points Students explore current principles and practices that form the basis for the development of service archi- tectures, touch points in the service and sustainable service ecologies. Project topics include preparation of briefs, the development of service architectures, and the specific ecology of a service and the strategic mapping of touch points that form the service ecolo- gies. Students will be encouraged to develop design processes and methods that enable them as designers to go through a process of ideation and iteration to create service design concepts. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 215, SERV 216.


SERV 312 Prototyping Experiences An essential part of defining and designing services is the conceptualization, development and simula- tion of a service concept and its ecology including all touch points engaged with when using the service. Experience prototypes are used for rapid ideation of services by simulating the experience the customer has. Students learn to develop low, medium and high fidelity experience prototypes. Scenarios are explored where new service concepts are ideated and simulated, describing and configuring the experiences of the user, onstage and offstage. Prerequisite(s): COMM 105, DSGN 115, ENGL 123.


SERV 325 Technology and Services This course identifies and familiarizes the student with key strategic and enabling technologies that are used to implement and support services. Students will learn about enterprise solutions, core technologies, systems, and applications that are used to implement services that deliver both information and experiences. The course will review established and emerging informa- tion and communication technologies used today and in the near future. Typically this class will examine per- sonal and enterprise computing, information process- ing, data storage and retrieval, networking technolo- gies, and embedded technologies in such devices as consumer electronics, mobile telephony and hand-held personal digital assistants. Prerequisite(s): IACT 315.


SERV 421 Services and Enterprise This course studies the different and diverse busi- ness paradigms that dominate the service sectors. The course examines the nature of different service enterprises and their characteristics. Participants will examine a diverse range of sectors, including retail, health, transport, finance and entertainment, and logistics among others. Students review the different types of platforms for delivering services and the dif- ferent company structures and operational models that enable a business to flourish, including small, medium and large enterprises. Students are introduced to the principles and practices of a successful enterprise and the importance of developing appropriate strategies that lead to an innovative and successful business in the marketplace. Prerequisite(s): SERV 311.


SERV 431 Service Design Senior Studio Students work on solving service design problems developing innovative services, products and experi- ences within physical and virtual environments. The concept of service design is developed and explored using comprehensive design processes. Specific tech- niques, guidelines and examples are used to emphasize the practical aspects of service design where students are required to design in a way that is both user cen- tric and market oriented. Students must consider the social, technological and economic considerations when designing services where they research lifestyle and the context of use of the service. Prerequisite(s): SERV 421.


Service Design (Graduate)


SERV 711 Service Design: Principles and Practice Through a series of presentations, discussions, and short projects, students explore the current and emerging principles and theories that form the basis for the practice of service design. Project topics include preparation of briefs, the development of


cour se descr ipt ions


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