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HIPR 716 Building Assessment Strategies I This course presents methods for the analysis and interpretation of historic building resources. Identifica- tion, research, documentation, analysis, and interpreta- tion skills are developed through filed application and projects. This course is required for the Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts degrees. When offered online, this course requires a one week residency to work with the course professor. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 709.


HIPR 717 Preservation of the Cultural Landscape The cultural landscape is the tangible and intangible impression made by humans on their environment. In this course, students examine the relationship between the cultural landscape and the built environment. Topics include whether or not to preserve a cultural landscape in a changing world – and how to meet the challenge.


HIPR 718 International Heritage Protection International heritage protection relies on cooperative agreements or conventions that address the protection of cultural resources. Several international organiza- tions have as part of their mission the identification, documentation, and protection of cultural resources. This course explores the international agreements intended to protect cultural resources, considers how those agreements operate, and evaluates how effective they have been. Students investigate the workings of international organizations that deal with the protec- tion of cultural resources.


HIPR 720 Heritage Tourism Heritage tourism is a significant part of the economy of many places in the world. It can be an important vehicle for cultural exchange, providing a personal experience not only of what has survived from the past but of the contemporary society. Heritage tourism can also overwhelm an area and contribute to the decline and near destruction of a culture. This course examines the phenomenon of heritage tourism and considers its benefits, its burdens and how it may be managed.


HIPR 721 Preservation Planning in the Built Environment This course acknowledges linkages between rural and urban preservation and addresses issues and planning strategies common to both settings. Through readings and extended project work, students are introduced to the philosophy, problems and practical solutions of preservation planning. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 703.


HIPR 726 Revitalizing Downtowns This course incorporates concepts of law, econom- ics and planning to provide a holistic analysis of the process by which downtown areas can be revitalized. The course explores the Main Street 4 Point Approach that combines organization, design, promotion, and economic restructuring to accomplish sustainable revitalization of downtowns. The course also consid- ers the effects of current trends in development, such as SmartGrowth and New Urbanism, on the process of downtown revitalization. The course uses lectures to explain and case studies to emphasize concepts.


HIPR 729 International Preservation Seminar International preservation organizations, techniques and relationships evolve and change. This course provides an opportunity for students to observe the changes that are occurring in the field of international preservation as well as focus on topical issues. This course also serves as the beginning of the students’ formulation of their topic and research methodology for the final project. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 700.


HIPR 730 Historic Paint and Decorative Finish Analysis This course introduces the methodology of historic paint and decorative finish analysis. On site and labora- tory examination of historic finishes are accomplished using traditional accepted technologies. Students also recreate and remediate damaged finishes. Color analysis in this class is standardized using the Munsell® color system.


HIPR 732 The Cultural Landscape of Petroleum This seminar course introduces students to landmark texts and readings relevant to the impact of petroleum in our cultural landscape. Readings and discussions explore the cultural influences behind our conscious and unconscious reliance on petroleum. Course work is aimed at offering differing approaches to identifying the depth of oil’s influence on our culture and the pos- sible solutions for sustainable communities.


HIPR 733 Preservation of the Recent Past This dynamic seminar class introduces students to the timely and controversial topic of the preservation of our more recent heritage. Through lectures, site visits, readings, and discussions, students will explore and analyze the myriad challenges associated with the preservation of these resources. The impact of previous and current national and international initiatives will be evaluated. Students will then apply this knowledge to a project that focuses on developing innovative, practical, philosophically-grounded and replicable solutions to address the many challenges of preserv- ing the recent past.


HIPR 734 Preservation Rehabilitation In this course, students undertake and complete a rehabilitation plan for a specified structure, making use of skills acquired in historic preservation and address- ing the needs of commercial viability. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701, HIPR 706, HIPR 709, HIPR 716.


HIPR 735 The National Register of Historic Places The National Register of Historic Places—a list of the most significant cultural resources in the United States—is administered by the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior. More than filling out a form, application to the National Register requires a thorough understanding of the historical, social, and political aspects of recognizing significant buildings, sites, structures, objects and districts. This course pro- vides the student with the history of the National Reg- ister, the understanding of the process of nomination, and the ability to complete a nomination form in its political and social context. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 706.


HIPR 739 International Preservation Technology The techniques that are used to preserve cultural heritage vary according to the resource itself. Other influences include the spatial and temporal contexts in which they were created, and the current condi- tions under which they exist. This course examines the wide range of preservation techniques from around the world as they apply to specific resources, and considers how those techniques might provide insight into addressing preservation issues from other areas. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 700.


HIPR 742 Preservation Management for the Nonprofit This course focuses on the processes for successful nonprofit historic organizations. The course provides information about roles and responsibilities of the director, the executive committee, the board of direc- tors and committees. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701.


HIPR 743 Advanced Conservation Science This course presents the analytical methodology required to understand the characteristics of building materials. Students are involved in various experiments that analyze the chemical and physical mechanisms of materials deterioration and use scientific methods to interpret this data. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 709.


HIPR 744 Context of Design in Preservation This course focuses on the role of design in the field of historic preservation within the context of existing historical structures. Students are involved in survey, study and design within an actual historic streetscape. An emphasis on the specifics of the individual build- ings of the streetscape contributes to students’ abil- ity to discern the uniqueness of each architectural style, the period in which it was built and the overall homogeneity of the particular streetscape. The chosen streetscape includes a single undeveloped site for which students develop criteria to design an infill struc-


ture that is sympathetic to the surrounding historical structures, yet representative of and appropriate to the current era.


HIPR 745 Emerging Issues in Historic Preservation This seminar course provides students an environment for analysis and discussion of contemporary issues affecting the preservation profession. Theoretical and practical approaches to such issues as social, techno- logical, and political changes will be analyzed for their impact on historic preservation and heritage steward- ship locally, nationally, and internationally.


HIPR 746 Architectural Glass Preservation Techniques Taking a comprehensive approach to the treatment of historic architectural glass, students learn its various forms, common deterioration challenges, and ethical procedures for the application of conservation tech- niques. Site visits and demonstrations are combined with hands-on opportunities for students in this studio course. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 709.


HIPR 747 Conservation in Historic Cemeteries Preservationists working in historic cemeteries must have a comprehensive approach to conservation. This course offers a range of experiences (classroom, laboratory, field) for the student to learn methods for conserving monuments and enclosures in such materi- als as wood, stone, and metal. As a cultural landscape, the cemetery’s history, form, and meaning will also be addressed in treatment. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 709.


HIPR 749 Historic Preservation M.A. Final Project This course focuses on the development and comple- tion of a final, comprehensive M.A. project. Projects may be research or site based and must be conducted at an advanced level of complexity and challenge. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 704.


HIPR 751 Building Assessment Strategies II This course is second in a two-course sequence. The class provides a comprehensive assessment of historic building resources. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 716.


HIPR 755 Preservation Philosophy and Criticism This course analyzes critically the cultural and technical basis of the built environment. Based on this analysis, students examine the repertoire of preservation phi- losophies, both historic and current. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701, HIPR 706.


HIPR 757 Preservation Restoration This course examines the appropriate application of restoration standards in historic buildings. Emphasis is placed on significant structures worthy of total restora- tion and practical restoration of building fabrics. Resto- ration standards in this course follow those established by the Secretary of the Interior. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701, HIPR 706, HIPR 716.


HIPR 762 Interpreting the Domestic Interior 1830-1930 The period 1830-1930 witnessed a nation that pos- sessed an expanding frontier, a belief in personal upward mobility and the freedom for great geo- graphic and social mobility. Supported by the innova- tions in technology, communications and science the built environment and material culture of the nation changed dramatically between 1830 and 1930. Apart from examining the stylistic changes occurring in architecture and domestic fashion the students are encouraged to examine and consider the evolution of issues such as comfort, domesticity, hygiene, privacy, gender and the technology of the domestic interior. Source material includes trade catalogues novels, films, house plans and other period and contemporary resources. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701.


HIPR 765 Preservation Seminar This second-year graduate lecture series prepares students for entry into the field of historic preservation. Classroom activities are augmented by guest lectures by professionals and field trips to successful preserva- tion organizations in the Southeast. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701, HIPR 706, HIPR 709.


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