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external structure while at the same time enabling the horse to achieve the peak of its performance abilities. Prerequisite(s): EQST 115.


EQST 310 Competition Horse Footing In this course, students discuss the various options in arena surfaces and footing that are available for the performance horse. These discussions include explora- tion of construction and proper design of outdoor and indoor riding arenas, natural and man-made drainage, fault lines, base and sub-base construction, and riding surface options, both natural and synthetic. Emphasis is placed on selection of riding surfaces as they relate to the horse’s ability to perform properly and without injury. In addition, students gain an understanding of footing issues, arena maintenance, necessary equip- ment, bonding agents and financial considerations. Prerequisite(s): EQST 205.


EQST 315 Equine Business Management This course is a vital component in understanding pro- fessional practices in equestrian management, with the focus on the student learning effective skills to manage clients, regulatory bodies and legal offices. Students learn about contract and understand the major legal implications throughout the industry. Students also develop a small business plan appropriate to the equestrian industry and use small business tools to cre- ate an effective marketing campaign in the equestrian business. Prerequisite(s): EQST 110.


EQST 330 Equine Systems, Disorders and Lameness Students study the systems of the horse including cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous, endocrine, gas- trointestinal, etc. Normal signs of health and body function are discussed so that the student can begin to recognize abnormalities as they relate to these body functions. Advanced first-aid techniques are also introduced. Indepth discussions will include a study of bone structure, tendons, ligaments, circulation and related lameness. Students will discuss the impor- tance and administration of the proper medications for basic lameness and other disorders. Emphasis is placed on detection and early treatment of ailments. Prerequisite(s): EQST 110.


EQST 340 Rules and Regulations for Competition Horses This course is designed to expose students to the orga- nizations such as the United States Equestrian Federa- tion, the United States Hunter Jumper Association and the Fédération Équestre Internationale that organize and govern the world of the sport horse. Students will be exposed to the philosophies, rules and regulations that govern the various aspects of showing horses, from licensing, to violations and penalties, to drugs and medications, to conduct and sportsmanship, and to the class specifications of various disciplines and divisions. This course prepares students to understand their potential role as a trainer, rider, barn manager, exhibitor, licensed official or show manager in the horse industry. Prerequisite(s): EQST 205.


EQST 350 Contracts and Equine Law/Liability This course provides students with a basic understand- ing of the principles of equine law necessary to own horses, and/or operate an equine business. Students review statutes, case law and readings discussing legal issues faced by equine businesses including liability laws as they relate to horses; contracts associated with equine business; business organization taxes; ethical issues; equine care requirements; infectious disease regulation law; transport; manure management; and equine insurance. Prerequisite(s): EQST 205.


EQST 400 Judging and Selection of the Performance Horse This course will provide the student with an under- standing of how to evaluate and select horses for sale and performance and judge the horse and/or rider’s performance in competition. Students will develop cri- teria for judging in the disciplines of hunters including conformation, hunter seat equitation and jumpers. The criteria will be based upon a formulation of a subjective ideal model for use in rating performance and quality based upon the rules outlined by the United States


Equestrian Federation or other appropriate governing bodies. The technical rules and regulations for judging different classes and divisions will also be determined. Students will be made aware of the procedure and the requirements necessary to become a licensed official and are expected to spend a minimum of two divi- sions at a recognized horse show “learner” judging. Prerequisite(s): EQST 340.


EQST 410 Course Design In this course, the artistry of designing courses for competition horses in the disciplines of hunters, jump- ers and hunter seat equitation are explored in terms of potentialities, limitations and hazards. Students discuss the technical regulations that govern course design in the United States as well as in some international (FEI) venues. Emphasis is placed on designing and setting level-appropriate courses that influence a safe and dynamic jumping effort from the horse as they relate to each discipline, the various types and sizes of obstacles, striding and related distances, combina- tions, appropriate tracks, footing, site evaluation and arena size as well as the impact of weather and safety concerns. Prerequisite(s): EQST 205.


EQST 425 Capstone Seminar in Equestrian Studies The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to develop and refine various aspects of becoming a professional in the equestrian industry while exploring issues relating to preparation and development for a successful lifelong career. Emphasis will be placed on such topics as self-management, teamwork, time management and learning styles that will be necessary for success in the workplace. Students will concentrate on career options, build- ing a quality résumé and interviewing techniques. Prerequisite(s): EQST 215.


English as a Second Language (Undergraduate)


ESL 100 Basic English for Non Native Speakers The focus of this course is on beginning level English language skills. Level one of the course is basic lan- guage development that prepares the student for level two. Through development the series of exercises and assignments in level one students move on to level two of the course which addresses specific grammatical structures of English. In level two course work, students use language to express basic ideas in an organized way with effective transitions and simple supporting elements at both the sentence and short paragraph level. Students also develop their ability to communi- cate about social, cultural and academic topics.


ESL 101 English in Context This course prepares students to become more flu- ent communicators by strengthening language skills introduced in level 2 coursework. Students develop the skills to answer questions based on lectures (written or spoken). Coursework presented in Level 4 provides an introduction to basic art terms, as well as strategies to recognize and describe the visual elements of art and design in English. Prerequisite(s): ESL 100.


ESL 102 Art and Design in English Context Students continue to build their art, design and aca- demic vocabulary in this course. Exploration of the critique process and discussions about design and works of art are emphasized. Students engage in critical dialogues, presentations, readings and written assignments in preparation for active participation in a variety of English language settings, with a special focus on lecture and studio contexts. Prerequisite(s): ESL 101.


ESL 220 Grammar in Context II This course focuses on the basic, specific grammatical structures of English with communicative, contextual practice in other modes of language at the sentence and paragraph level including: deconstructing active language to identify the target structure, dynamic grammar drills, role plays, worksheets, online activi- ties, short written, reading and response assignments.


ESL 230 Writing II Students in this course focus on the use written lan- guage to express basic ideas in an organized way with effective transitions and simple supporting elements at both the sentence and short paragraph level. Stu- dents begin the practice of learning how to self-edit and peer-edit their own writing in a foreign language.


ESL 240 Reading and Vocabulary II Focusing on the introduction of strategies to develop students’ vocabulary, this course develops reading comprehension and speed through a variety of short reading materials including art and design content, fiction and non-fiction.


ESL 250 Listening and Speaking II Focused on the ability to listen to and speak about social, cultural and academic topics with partners, students in this course listen to text, conversations and mini lectures to identify the main ideas and spe- cific important information presented. With pronun- ciation drills and dictations to reinforce the grammar structures of other courses, students practice speech appropriate to both social and academic settings with emphasis placed on developing control and verbal output of their message.


ESL 331 Academic Writing and Speaking III Through the motivating content of popular SCAD majors, students will become skilled observers of American culture and improve their English communi- cation skills. In addition to focusing on formal academic writing and speaking, students develop their creative language abilities in individual and group writing and speaking projects while learning about arts and design industries.


ESL 332 Cultural Topics in Writing and Speaking III This course is designed to help ESL students adjust to study in North America at SCAD. The course will provide rigorous practice in vocabulary, language structures, writing, and speaking while providing cul- tural background needed to effectively live, participate and study on a SCAD campus and in the United States.


ESL 333 Topics for a Global Community III This course emphasizes language acquisition skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) while explor- ing the broad concepts of various communities in and around campus. Students learn to generate and apply creative ideas in oral and written assignments. An equal emphasis is put on reading and listening skills development in the content area. Students learn to create individual writing portfolios, based on the content of the class.


ESL 334 Writing for Publication III News gathering, writing, and editing information for publication provides international students with both a practical and a creative way to practice and demonstrate proficiency in all language acquisition skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), while producing a professional departmental newsletter. Close supervision of individual and group work is a vital component of the course.


ESL 335 The Art of Being a Professional III This course leads ESL graduate students through a job search, resume writing, interview and negotiation practice to prepare talented students to search for internships and employment within the United States. Items of special interest in the course are cross-cultural differences in job search procedures and establishing interview skills.


ESL 336 Language of Art and Design III This course emphasizes art terminology and usage and is a prerequisite course for all language support classes as well as a preparation for Level V courses in Read- ing and Writing in Art History and Contemporary Art.


ESL 341 Academic Reading and Vocabulary III This course develops students’ reading comprehension and speech through a variety of authentic reading materials including art and design content, fiction and non-fiction. There is a focus on expanding the academic lexicon; guessing meaning from context


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