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exploring a variety of topics through the non-digital medium. Working through a range of design styles from nondigital strategy games to Eurogames games to art games, students become adept artists in the medium culminating in a non-digital prototype at the course’s conclusion. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 705 or SDES 704.


ITGM 719 Scripting for Interactivity This course explores programming skills through the use of scripting languages found in industry-standard Web development tools. They create highly interac- tive Web applications with sophisticated and exciting interfaces. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 715.


ITGM 720 Interactive Art and Culture In this course, students examine theoretical design concepts and principles applicable to the interac- tive design and game development industries while tracing the history and evolution of past productions. Students can develop a sense of aesthetics through examining social and artistic influences in computer mediated communications and critiquing on essen- tial compositional components of immersive design. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 701.


ITGM 721 Environments for Games This course centers on the physical building of virtual worlds and the aesthetic/game play needs associ- ated with these worlds. Students create a variety of level types, including indoor and outdoor world levels, and then optimize those worlds for export to industry-standard game engines. The course also covers the rebuilding and repositioning of game geometry for game play and specific techniques for exporting geometry from various 3-D game applica- tions. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 710.


ITGM 723 Human-centered Interactive Design The aim of human-centered interaction studies is to humanize technology and to design interfaces from a human-centered, activity-based approach rather than from a technological or design perspective. This course provides students with knowledge that enables them to design Web and interactive applications that are not just aesthetically pleasing but also highly usable by their intended audiences. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 705.


ITGM 727 Databases and Dynamic Web Site Programming Databases form an integral part of the World Wide Web today. The majority of serious corporate Web sites utilize complex database functions to track customer information, manage the site and provide specialized data to specific users. This course explores methods for creating, maintaining and manipulating a database that drives a graphic Web site examines how the database affects Web site design, architecture and functionality. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 715.


ITGM 730 Internet Products for Marketing This course explores the expanding area of Web marketing and addresses the impact of Web traf- fic and metrics on the design. Students gain a solid understanding of the techniques for improving user loyalty through the use of online tools for measuring the success, “rentability” and viability of their Web productions. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 715.


ITGM 733 Digital Sculpting for Video Games This course explores the creation of complex models and textures for use in video game development. Students are introduced to current theory, functional aesthetics, and advanced techniques relevant to digital sculpture. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or ITGM 710.


ITGM 736 Physical Interactive Media This course enables students to analyze and develop interactive projects with physical input devices. Stu- dents develop simple interactive prototypes using switches, sensors and computer vision interfaces. Alongside the practical coursework, students read, analyze and discuss the origins and evolution of inter- active art, interaction design and alternative gaming through relevant texts and projects. In the second part of the class, they research appropriate hardware and software solutions and develop independently


a personal project. Students also produce short video documentation of each one of their projects. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 723.


ITGM 737 Game Balance Through in-class exercises and demonstrative lectures, students learn, model and ultimately apply time-tested tools and techniques that are used to design, evalu- ate and balance games. Topics include cost curves, gameplay metrics, randomness, pacing and player progression, and transitive and intransitive relation- ships in games. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 706 or ITGM 716.


ITGM 740 Machinima: The Art of Real-time Cinematics Machinima is the art of making cinematics using realtime graphics engine technology. This is rapidly growing area in the art of storytelling. Machinima art- ists use game content and technology to express their ideas and tell stories. This course culminates in the production of a short machinima film. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 721.


ITGM 748 Interactive Design and Game Development M.A. Final Project Students have the option of choosing to develop a final project or a final portfolio. This course allows returning professionals who have already constructed professional portfolios to work on a full-term project while giving those who are in need of a portfolio the chance to create one with the professionalism and presentation quality industry demands. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 723.


ITGM 749 Interactive Design and Game Development Portfolio Students focus on the integration of imagery, Web sites, video and various other elements into an interac- tive portfolio. Concepts, cross-platform developments and issues concerning aesthetics, interface design and use of media are addressed. Students collect relevant material and produce a CD/DVD/Web-based portfolio, packaging for portfolio, résumé, cover letter, business cards, flat book portfolio and optional VHS-based material. M.A. students enroll in this course during their final quarter of studies in the interactive design and game development program. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 723.


ITGM 750 Physical Interactive Media II Students are exposed to advanced input/ouput inter- action technologies such as computer vision, gesture recognition, touchscreen interfaces, and spatial-aware devices. Students research, analyze and present the work of the best designers in the field of physical computing. They produce through an iterative design process a series of sophisticated installations demon- strating their ability to use physical computing tech- niques for expressive and artistic purposes.


ITGM 755 Interactive Design and Game Development Studio I In this required seminar/studio course, students develop and define a personal vision in their area of interest. As preparation for thesis work, this course is flexible and self-directed, with a strong emphasis on critique. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 705.


ITGM 758 Programming for Game Development In this course, students are introduced to the appro- priate skills for working with an advanced game 3-D engine. Concepts covered include basic artificial intelligence, path planning, decision-making systems and game logic. Additional focus is on applied linear algebra, basic Newtonian physics, graphics protocols and related differential equations. Problem-solving skills and a broad overview of essential materials and techniques are the desired outcome of this class. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 721.


ITGM 760 Game Design Auteurism Through an in-depth focus on the masters of game design and their methodologies, techniques and pro- cess, students begin to formulate a vocabulary and a dialog to critique existing game designs. Students learn to explain and demonstrate how these design- ers and their games have influenced their own work. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 705.


ITGM 765 Interactive Design and Game Development Studio II In this required seminar/studio, students develop and define a personal vision in their area of interest. As preparation for thesis work, this course is flexible and self-directed with a strong emphasis on critique. This class primarily addresses the development of pre-pro- duction work for the thesis. Prerequisite(s): ITGM 755.


ITGM 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


ITGM 779T Graduate Teaching Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


ITGM 780 Special Topics in Interactive Design and Game Development This graduate elective course provides an opportunity for students to focus on particular issues in the field or to study advanced techniques and processes. Faculty, course content and prerequisites vary each time the course is offered. The course may include lectures, dis- cussions, individual projects and critiques, depending on the nature of the topic.


ITGM 790 Interactive Design and Game Development M.F.A. Thesis M.F.A students in interactive design and game develop- ment develop an innovative and theoretically informed body of work that is exhibited in a manner and context that supports its creative content. Students also pro- duce a written component that addresses the theoreti- cal premise of the work.


Liberal Arts (Undergraduate)


LIBA 220 Special Topics in Liberal Arts This course is designed to provide opportunities to study in areas not covered in the traditional curriculum. Emphasis is given to the application of knowledge to the student’s major or field of interest. The subject matter varies each time it is offered.


MUSM 479 Museum Internship Liberal Arts (Graduate)


LIBA 700 Writing the Graduate Thesis Students taking this course are introduced to writing and research skills that prepare them for the written portion of a graduate thesis. Workshops and library sessions supplement class work in such topics as out- lining, researching and conducting art and literature reviews, constructing an annotated bibliography, and writing a thesis prospectus.


Luxury and Fashion Management (Graduate)


LXFM 501 Professional Concepts and Theories for the Fashion Industry This course explores the professional business aspects of the fashion industry. It will address the sectors and functions of the industry that oversee the operational and decision-making processes. Students will gain an understanding of fashion business practices, includ- ing the fiscal and organizational structures that make up effective business entities. Students are expected to formulate a business plan in preparation for entry into the industry.


LXFM 502 Fashion Marketing and Advertising Principles This course explores an expanding area of the fashion industry through a series of interactive projects includ- ing but not limited to visual merchandising, fashion advertising and professional practices in the luxury market sector.


LXFM 720 Supply Chain Management Strategies A thorough exploration of supply chain management from the manufacturer’s perspective is presented. Major areas of global sourcing, vendor evaluation,


cour se descr ipt ions


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