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By integrating historical studies, theory and practice, students address issues central to the visual effects industry and develop conceptual ideologies.


VSFX 715 Digital Compositing I This course introduces high-end digital multilayer- ing. Techniques and aesthetic issues are explored to produce time-based imagery. Students acquire and integrate aesthetically driven live-action imagery into broadcast or visual effects projects utilizing a wide range of media formats. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or VSFX 708.


VSFX 721 Procedural Modeling and Animation Students learn about the techniques of procedural modeling and animation used in visual effects film. Stu- dents use procedural modeling techniques and camera techniques and prepare documentation required in visual effects productions. The end result is a visual effects portfolio of professional quality. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or VSFX 708, VSFX 705.


VSFX 735 Visual Effects Studio I Students define a personal vision creating visual effects for film. Concentrating on the design of visual effects sequences, specific attention is directed toward the development of scripts, storyboards, shot break- downs, animatics, technical direction documents, estimates and schedules in the planning process. As preparation for thesis work, this course is flexible with a strong emphasis on critique. Prerequisite(s): VSFX 709.


VSFX 749 Visual Effects Portfolio Students focus on the integration of imagery, Web sites, video and various elements into a visual effects portfolio. Students are expected to learn and apply effective tools for self-promotion, including a reel, CD compilation, Web site, cover letter and résumé. Proper and effective marketing techniques, interviewing tech- niques, job search strategies and business practices are covered to provide an understanding of operations in the effects industry. M.A. students enroll in this course during their final quarter of the visual effects program. Prerequisite(s): VSFX 735.


VSFX 751 Matchmoving By exploring concepts in 3-D camera matchmove of live action scenes as well as rigid object tracking, stu- dents experience tracking 3-D shots by hand and by applying the use of camera tracking software. Students analyze data and create seamless camera connections between live action shots and 3-D computer gener- ated objects. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or VSFX 708 or VSFX 709.


VSFX 752 3-D Color, Lighting and Rendering Students develop believable lighting and rendering solutions for environments in both live-action integra- tion and computer-generated scenes. Students will understand the lighting tools available as well as a variety of rendering techniques to create believable lighting situations. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or VSFX 708 or VSFX 709.


VSFX 753 Motion Capture and Integration Exploring concepts in motion capture technology, students will establish the skills required to create precise data based on a live action actor. They will refine their data editing skills for applying this skeletal motion data to previously rigged characters, which will result in a 3-D representation of realistic motion in a visual effects context. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or VSFX 708 or VSFX 709.


VSFX 755 Procedural 3-D and Shader Programming This course is an in-depth study of programming techniques used to develop the artistic vision of a 3-D environment. Industry standard shader language is used to create rendering effects for the production of still images and animations using the most prevalent software in the industry. Prerequisite(s): VSFX 705.


VSFX 757 Visual Effects Creature Look Development Exploring the challenges of inte- grating photo-real creatures into live action films, stu- dents will establish the look and style of 3-D creatures through the definition of surface attributes. Students


will refine their pre-visualization skills and abilities to create a final rendered look for a digital creature. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or VSFX 708 or VSFX 709.


VSFX 758 Digital Compositing II In this course, students learn advanced multi-layering techniques combining CGI, live action and graphics to resolve complex problems in motion design and visual effects technologies. Prerequisite(s): VSFX 715.


VSFX 762 Matte Painting This course addresses the role of digital matte painting in augmenting the visual environment; students apply this technique to the re-creation of both realistic and fantasy scenes. Issues such as color, space, depth, and perspective as painting techniques are explored. The elements create in the course may be used with 3-D elements and composited for other projects. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or VSFX 708.


VSFX 763 3-D Environment Rendering Exploring concepts in digital environments, students will establish the look and style of a completely 3-D environment. Students will define surface attributes and shading networks for a variety of environment surfaces to refine their pre-visualization skills. They will develop styles of 3-D environments to enhance the storytelling process. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or VSFX 708 or VSFX 709.


VSFX 766 Technical Director Methods This course focuses on the global fundamentals of workstation scripting and programming specifically for visual effects. This includes workstation editing tools, UNIX shell scripting, PERL, MEL and Hscript scripting, and creating geometry via PERL programming. The course covers developing a technical director util- ity bin, including renaming files and object parsing. Students are introduced to large-scale file manage- ment and Render-farm management. Prerequisite(s): VSFX 705.


VSFX 768 Photorealistic Modeling Advanced 3-D Modeling Techniques focuses on tech- niques such as subdivision surfaces, and image-based and Brush-based modeling. Although generating efficient, high-quality 3-D models will be the primary emphasis, a secondary emphasis will be placed on accurate and efficient texturing. Various 3-D mod- eling and 2-D painting applications are covered. Prerequisite(s): ANIM 709 or VSFX 708 or VSFX 709.


VSFX 775 Visual Effects Studio II Students analyze the possibilities and constraints of visual effects design as they refine an entire visual effects vision for visual effects sequences. The course is flexible with a strong emphasis on thought processes, aesthetics and research. Prerequisite(s): VSFX 735.


VSFX 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


VSFX 779T Graduate Teaching Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


VSFX 780 Special Topics in Visual Effects This elective course provides an opportunity for stu- dents to focus on particular issues in the field or to study advanced techniques and processes. Faculty course content and prerequisites vary each time the course is offered. The course may include lectures, dis- cussions, individual projects and critiques, depending on the nature of the topic.


VSFX 790 Visual Effects M.F.A. Thesis Visual Effects M.F.A. students develop an innova- tive and theoretically informed body of work that is exhibited in a manner and context that supports its creative content. A written component that addresses the theoretical premise of the work is also required. Prerequisite(s): VSFX 735.


Writing (Undergraduate)


WRIT 177 Nonfiction Writing I Through workshops, draft revisions and analysis of major nonfiction prose writers, this course covers basic techniques in nonfiction. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


WRIT 205 Writing for the Arts I By exploring various styles and genres of writing that are commonly used in the art world, students learn about writing for the arts including how to write grants, find appropriate funding sources, work with commer- cial exhibitions, catalogue works, and compose short bibliographies of artists. Students also write articles in the style of contemporary art journals and engage in peer collaborations. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


WRIT 210 Promotional Writing As an applied course with a broad immersion into the study and practice of promotion management, students will develop and write a complete promotion plan, which will include a press release, press kit and brochure writing. Through a variety of written and oral communication exercises, students develop their com- munications skills to better promote themselves and their work. Topics covered include the study of pro- motional positioning strategies, promotion tool devel- opment and creation, event planning and measuring promotional effectiveness. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


WRIT 220 Writing for the Web In today’s Internet dominated society, people acquire much of their information from the Web. In order to improve the readability of Web materials, writers need to better understand and gain confidence in using this rapidly emerging form of communication. In this course, students enhance their knowledge of writing in a scannable format, as well as other writing and editing techniques that enable them to compete in this increasingly sophisticated world of online publications and services. Prerequisite(s): CMPA 100 or CMPA 110 or ELDS 205 or ELDS 225.


WRIT 225 Writing for Television Using the sitcom as a model, students will study the three-act structured genre by writing an adaptation to a show now on TV to create their own original sitcom. Students will learn to analyze and address issues dis- cussed in class regarding originality and successes in writing for television, as well as applying those skills as they develop their own original show. Skills that will be developed include character development, dialogue, plot, timing and visual writing techniques. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 177.


WRIT 255 Business and Professional Writing Workplace writing—including memos, proposals, pamphlets and instructions—is examined and practiced in this introductory course. Students gain real-world writing experiences that help prepare them for the professional world. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


WRIT 277 Nonfiction Writing II This course offers an intense focus for students inter- ested in publishing their work, covering elements of nonfiction writing such as tone, unity and thematic development. Students produce manuscripts for group readings. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 177.


WRIT 305 Writing for the Arts II A focused study of one artist provides the basis for students to practice and master extensive research- ing, writing and presentation skills. The essential relationship of writer/reader/subject will be explored. Students will produce a portfolio of documents based on the artist’s life and work. This portfolio will include promotional pieces, scripts for docent tours, analysis of work, creative responses, requests for funds, anno- tated bibliographies, catalog entries, and/or reviews. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 205.


WRIT 307 Writing for Decorative Art and Design A critical study of major 19th and 20th century British and American manuals of art and design, including works by Charles Eastlake, Ogden Codman Jr., Edith Wharton and Elsie de Wolfe, students study these works as expressions of a given era’s style and taste,


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