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and genres; gain valuable performance experience; define their particular interests as vocal music artists; and develop a work they may market professionally. Class combines in-class work and outside research and rehearsal that culminates in public performance (if applicable) or simple recording. Prerequisite(s): MUST 260.


MUST 360 Musical Theater Repertoire II This course provides further guidance in the inter- pretation and performance of texts that fall in the musical theater genre. Students participate in solos, duets and other ensembles to build their repertoire and improve their craft. Performance is held to the highest professional standards, preparing students for the professional world. The course seeks to challenge students by incorporating pieces with a high degree of difficulty integrating more advanced skills into their performances. Prerequisite(s): MUST 260.


MUST 411 Musical Scene Study In this course, students learn and perform material from selected shows. Scenes are examined with respect to the music’s dramatic function and full con- text. The course emphasizes character work and the art of crafting the performance of a song within a scene. Students work in ensembles, and the scenes cover a broad cross section of repertoire. Prerequisite(s): MUST 260.


MUST 412 Vocal Genre Performance II Students in this course continue to build the skills to work independently in creating a full-length vocal performance piece; continue to research perfor- mance styles and genres; gain valuable performance experience; explore their particular interests as vocal music artists; and develop a work they may market professionally. Class combines in-class work and outside research and rehearsal that culminates in public performance (if applicable) or simple recording. Prerequisite(s): MUST 350.


MUST 440 Audition for Career in Vocal Music This course concentrates on developing self-marketing skills, finding auditions and agents, and then preparing and executing skills specific to the audition process: finding material appropriate for the performer and the situation; covering different styles, periods and genres of musical material; and learning audition etiquette and good performance practices. Students prac- tice acquired skills in a series of simulated auditions throughout the quarter. Prerequisite(s): MUST 260.


Philosophy (Undergraduate)


PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy This course provides a general introduction to the study of philosophy, including analysis of the sound- ness of arguments. Terms are precisely defined, and topics of contemporary relevance are explored.


PHIL 142 Studies in Existential Philosophy This course examines the thought and literature of existentialism, a modern philosophy of human exis- tence. Topics include the nature of angst, the struggle for individuality and authority, and the impact of mass institutions on the individual. The writings of Søren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Franz Kafka and others are explored. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


PHIL 202 World Religions This course introduces students to the study of com- parative religions with a focus on comparing and contrasting in a descriptive fashion the fundamental concepts and beliefs of the world’s major religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. Historical roots of the religions are traced. Students are encouraged to be open-minded and ecumenical in their approaches to religious perspectives.


PHIL 301 Aesthetics This course introduces students to aesthetics as a branch of modern philosophy. Aesthetic investigation applies the basic analytical tools of philosophy to tradi- tional concepts, arguments and theories of beauty and


art. The course addresses the issues of the difference between art and no-art, distinctions between good art and bad art, the definition of beauty, the function of art, and the main classical and contemporary theories of art. Prerequisite(s): ARLH 208 or ARTH 207.


PHIL 350 Ethical Theories and Issues This course is a philosophical study addressing con- temporary moral problems including: world hunger, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, pornography and legalization of drugs. Students read the main ethical concepts of leading philosophers. The latter is applied to and juxtaposed to contrasting views from promi- nent thinkers on contemporary moral problems. The moral issues to be studied in this course constitute the substance of political and social debate of our times. While it is not the task of this course to promote any one particular viewpoint, we examine and assess our own views as well as the viewpoints of others with the hope of appreciating the depth and complexity of both the problems and the myriad possible solutions to them. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.


Philosophy (Graduate)


PHIL 701 Aesthetics This course is designed to explore aesthetics as a branch of modern philosophy. Aesthetic investigation applies basic analytical tools of philosophy to issues such as the difference between art and nonart, the definition of beauty, the function of art and the main classical and contemporary theories of art.


Photography (Undergraduate)


PHOT 113 Photographic Foundations I Through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, assignments and critiques, students learn to see pho- tographically through an exploration of the basic tools, techniques and aesthetics of digital photography, with an emphasis on the creative use of camera controls, exposure, digital imaging software, and an awareness of the critical issues in contemporary photography.


PHOT 114 Photographic Foundations II Expanding upon the basic photographic tools and techniques introduced in Photography Foundations I, students in this course gain an understanding of file management, digital printing techniques, controlled lighting possibilities, and in-depth imaging software skills. Also investigating critical issues in contemporary photography, the course is a combination of lectures, demonstrations, assignments and critiques with an emphasis on the creation of an advanced, cohesive final project. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 113.


PHOT 115 Black-and-white Technique Exploring introductory and intermediate techniques of exposure, development, scanning and printing of black-and-white film and print materials, this course consists of a special emphasis on tonal control through the creative application of the Zone System. Areas of investigation include film scanning, paper characteris- tics, developer choice and fabrication, print size, multi filter printing and chemical after-treatment. Further concentration is placed on aspects of design, com- position, perception and content in black-and-white photographs. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 114.


PHOT 206 Color Technique This course explores the use of color as an aesthetic tool in the hands of the creative commercial or expres- sive photographer. While the emphasis is on the use of negative, reversal and Polaroid films and print materi- als, attention is also paid to color theory, perception, aesthetics and the use of alternative color processes. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 115.


PHOT 219 Photography Project Seminar I This course leads students through an exploration of the use of the medium for personal expression. Stu- dents devise and produce a photographic project that expands on the techniques and processes mastered in previous courses. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 115, PHOT 206.


PHOT 220 Large-format Technique This course provides a thorough introduction to 4x5 and 8x10 view camera technology and aesthetics by covering a number of image-making techniques and applications in the studio and on location. Landscape, architecture, portraiture, still life and specialized areas are covered. View cameras are provided by the college. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 115, PHOT 206.


PHOT 238 History of Photography I This course examines the medium from its prehistory through the photo-secession and World War I. The use of photography as a commercial enterprise, a docu- mentary tool, a cultural force and a means of personal expression is explored. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110.


PHOT 240 History of Photography II This course examines the major issues and artists in photography from the early 20th century to the pres- ent. Although the emphasis is on photography as a fine art and its relationship to the other arts, topics include documentary photography and photojournalism, fashion and portraiture, and the use of photography in mass media. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110.


PHOT 312 Architectural Photography: Human-altered Landscapes This course explores the unique aesthetic and techni- cal challenges of photographing the human-altered landscape for personal expression and historical docu- mentation. Slide lecture topics include the history of landscape and architectural photography. Assignments focus on urban and rural landscapes and Individual and group critiques guide student production. Stu- dents may work in color and/or black and white and may use large-, medium- or small-format cameras. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 113.


PHOT 313 Studio Lighting Technique This course introduces the use of artificial lighting to create photographic illustrations in a controlled environment. Lighting techniques are demonstrated and applied in a series of photographic exercises with tabletop still life and portraiture. Both “hot lights” and electronic flash are used to achieve total control of composition, color, contrast and reflection. Emphasis is placed on the technical mastery of complex equip- ment, coupled with an aesthetic understanding of the physical principles of light. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 206, PHOT 220.


PHOT 317 Photographic Travel: The Foreign and the Familiar This course offers the unique photographic opportu- nity and challenge of finding intimacy and familiarity in the foreign portrait and the foreign landscape. Slide lectures explore important aspects of traveling with a camera in a foreign country and investigate how other photographers have faced this challenge. Assignments focus on urban and rural landscapes and popula- tions. Students may work in black and white and/or color and may use large- or small- format cameras. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 113.


PHOT 318 Light of Provence Dedicated to the awareness and application of natural light, this course introduces students to the concept of using light to beautify and enhance their photo- graphs. Through a series of practical exercises and individualized projects students explore the quality and attributes of the natural light found exclusively in the Provence region. Furthermore, students are made aware of the cultural and historical signifi- cance of Provence by drawing comparisons between contemporary and historical artists whose work has gained inspiration from the region’s unique ambience. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 113.


PHOT 319 Photography Project Seminar II This advanced course extends students’ exploration of the use of the photographic medium for per- sonal expression. Students devise and produce a photographic project that expands on the tech- niques and processes mastered in previous courses. Prerequisite(s): PHOT 219, PHOT 240, PHOT 313.


cour se descr ipt ions


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