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quality assurance, materials resource planning, inven- tory control, and budget considerations are covered. Students develop a seasonal production plan as a final project. Prerequisite(s): BUSI 710.


LXFM 730 Marketing of Luxury Goods This course is designed to develop a framework for understanding the ingredients of effective market- ing and the ever-changing environment of the luxury industry, such as globalization, brand images, and the diversity of customer bases and their expectations. Students develop a thorough knowledge of product development, marketing, communication, and manage- ment within the network of luxury fashion and fashion related industries. Prerequisite(s): BUSI 710.


LXFM 749 Luxury and Fashion Management M.A. Final Project Students in this course use presentation software storyboards, graphs and charts, as well as a written component, to demonstrate the functional, informa- tional, and critical thinking skills acquired throughout the program. Topics for the presentations are devel- oped by the associate chair of the department, on the advice of executives, to demonstrate the ability of the students to act as managers in industry. In the cap- stone seminar, emphasis is placed on global business concerns for the 21st century, including merchandis- ing, sourcing, marketing, financial management, and leadership. The capstone project is intended as the final, cross-disciplinary test of the management skills developed by the students in their graduate program. Prerequisite(s): FASH 782.


LXFM 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


LXFM 779T Graduate Teaching Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


LXFM 790 Luxury and Fashion Management M.F.A. Thesis All luxury fashion management M.F.A. students develop an original body of work that expands the body of knowledge in the field of fashion management for the luxury sector.


Marine Design (Undergraduate)


MARI 302 Principles and Theories of Marine Design This course concentrates on the naval architecture and engineering issues associated with boat design. Students are introduced to naval architecture, hydro- dynamics, hydrostatics and structural analysis pertain- ing to the safe design and operation of various styles of boats. Additionally, students explore the marine module of Rhino CAD software. Prerequisite(s): ELDS 205 or ELDS 225.


MARI 310 Survey of Composites This course explores the various aspects of building and designing marine applications with compos- ites including technical data related to composite manufacturing. This course supplements lectures with handson demonstrations and projects to give students a firsthand look at working with these unique materi- als. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 212 or FURN 200, and ELDS 205 or ELDS 225.


MARI 335 Marine Design Studio I This course allows students to investigate the design issues associated with boating while undertaking studio assignments intended to teach the fundamen- tal skills necessary to design various types of boats. Emphasis is placed on research, user needs and the development of hull forms, exteriors and interiors for a variety of boat design styles and uses, from utility to sailing power. Prerequisite(s): MARI 302, IDUS 213 or FURN 324 or INDS 321.


MARI 340 Marine Design Studio II In this course, students consider complex issues and conflicting criteria when solving marine design prob- lems. Students are expected to apply their project skills and technical knowledge to formulate design solutions that are visually appealing and functional. Prerequisite(s): IDUS 212, FURN 324 or IDUS 213 or INDS 321.


MARI 480 Marine Design Final Project This course will be a culmination of the marine design minor. Students working on advanced designs for the marine industry will demonstrate an understanding of naval architecture and engineering, an understanding of designing and building with composites and a keen sense of aesthetics for a particular segment of the marine market. Projects will vary by students but must meet the approval of the professor. Students may also undertake team projects or sponsored projects that meet the objectives of the course. Prerequisite(s): MARI 340.


MARI 495 Special Topics in Marine Design The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each seminar focuses on various problems in the field of marine design and allows advanced students to pursue individual or collaborative projects related to the topic of the course. Prerequisite(s): Vary accord- ing to topic.


Math (Undergraduate)


MATH 100 College Mathematics This course covers the fundamental principles of algebra, geometry and statistics. Topics are introduced through their applications to everyday events.


MATH 101 Intermediate Mathematics This course covers number systems, fractions, per- cents, measurement and fundamentals of algebra, plane geometry and trigonometry. The course empha- sizes execution and technique of mathematical opera- tions. A scientific calculator is required, and students are instructed on its use.


MATH 105 The Golden Ratio: Applications in Arts and the Humanities This course introduces students to the development and influence of the Golden Ratio from antiquity to the present utilizing examples from art, music, history, the sciences and mathematics. Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 or MATH 101 or SAT math score of at least 540 or ACT math score of at least 23.


MATH 201 Applied Mathematics This course covers number systems, fractions, per- cents, measurement and fundamentals of algebra, plane geometry and trigonometry. The course empha- sizes an understanding of mathematical concepts and takes a practical approach to mathematics. For- mal proofs and derivations are minimized, and the mathematical concepts are followed by a variety of occupationally related problems found in everyday situations. A scientific calculator is required, and stu- dents are instructed on its use. Prerequisite(s): MATH 101 or SAT math score of at least 540 or ACT math score of at least 23.


MATH 230 Pre-calculus This course provides the mathematical background needed for calculus. Concepts are presented and explored from algebraic, graphical and numerical perspectives. Students are expected to participate actively in the development of all concepts. Concepts covered include numerical patterns, polynomial and rational functions, complex numbers, analytic geom- etry, systems of equations, limits and continuity, and extensive coverage of trigonometry. Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 or MATH 101 or a passing score on the Math Competency Exam.


Military Science (Undergraduate)


MILS 110 Introduction to Leadership and Military Officership Foundations I Introductory course to leadership and first course in Army ROTC. Review of basic life skills, introduction


to, and organization of the Army, the Army value system and ethical behavior are covered. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program.


MILS 120 Introduction to Leadership and Military Officership Foundations II Continuation of 110 and open to all university students who want to become an Army officer, world leader or to learn more about the Army. Builds on lessons learned from 101 and develops problem-solving skills. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program.


MILS 130 Introduction to Leadership and Military Officership Foundations III This course is the culmination of topics taught in Introduction to Leadership and Military Officership Foundations I and II. Focuses on leadership theory, decision-making, factors that influence leadership. “Life Skills” continue to be developed. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program.


MILS 210 Individual Leadership I Develops knowledge of self, self-confidence and individual leadership skills. Instruction includes practi- cal exercises in and out of the classroom to develop problem solving and critical thinking skills. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program.


MILS 220 Individual Leadership II Continuation of Individual Leadership I focusing on developing knowledge of self, self-confidence and individual leadership skills. Instruction includes practi- cal exercises in and out of the classroom to develop problem solving and critical thinking skills. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program.


MILS 230 Leadership and Teamwork Focuses on self-development guided by knowledge of self and group processes. Challenges student’s cur- rent beliefs, knowledge, and skills. Provides equivalent preparation for the ROTC advanced course as the leader’s training course. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program.


MILS 250 Military History I This is a lecture-style course focusing on the evolution of the American Military. Topics covered include his- torical developments, national security, and the United States’ involvement in international responsibility and policies. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program.


MILS 260 Military History II This is a continuation of Military History I. This lecture style course focuses on the evolution of the American Military. Topics covered include historical develop- ments, national security, and the United States’ involve- ment in international responsibility and policies. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program. Prerequisite(s): MILS 250.


MILS 300 Leader’s Training Course Leader’s Training Course is four weeks of intense classroom and field training held in the summer at Fort Knox, Kentucky. This course is an accelerated version of the two years of leadership development training cadets receive in the basic course. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program.


MILS 310 Military Operations at Small Unit Level This course is an overview of military tactics conducted at the infantry squad, platoon, and company level. Stu- dents will analyze military missions and plan military operations, and train and lead squad in the execution of battle drills. This course is restricted to students who have officially joined the ROTC program.


MILS 320 Leadership and Problem Solving Develops knowledge of self, self-confidence and indi- vidual leadership skills; provides overview of national defense policy and analyzes role officers played in transition of the Army from Vietnam to the 21st


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