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Dramatic Writing (Graduate)


DWRI 708 Forms in Playwriting In this course, students study and analyze theories of dramatic forms and works considered exemplary of those forms. They demonstrate their understanding of dramatic forms by writing works that employ the techniques common to these forms.


DWRI 738 Playwriting Focused on verisimilitude, this graduate course hones the elements and execution of playwriting to allow student to compose original works for production. Students in this course write a one-act play and two scenarios for full-length plays, focusing on realistic dialogue. Prerequisite(s): DWRI 708 or MPRA 728.


DWRI 740 Playwrights, Actors, and Directors Lab This course is designed to focus on the elements of rehearsal procedures and protocols, and the means by which they shape the dramatic writing process. As a practical studio course, students create a dramatic playscript within a collaborative process that results in a performance and a subsequent final draft of a new drama. Prerequisite(s): DWRI 708 or MPRA 707.


DWRI 742 Literary Adaptation for the Stage Adaptations are a major component of any theatrical season. In this course students assess and analyze an existing literary work for a play, and then adapt that work for the stage. All forms of theatrical adaptation are studied, from dramas and comedies to musicals. Prerequisite(s): DWRI 738.


DWRI 775 Dramaturgy This course provides the dramatic writing graduate student insight into the art of writing and produc- ing plays by looking at the role of the dramaturge. Focusing on the craft or the techniques of dramatic composition in a holistic sense, students learn the value and importance of their work in the success of a given production within a series of productions. Prerequisite(s): DWRI 708 or MPRA 707.


DWRI 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


DWRI 779T Graduate Teaching Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


DWRI 790 Dramatic Writing M.F.A. Thesis Emphasis on this advanced course is on the study and application of the art of playwriting. Working through the writing, rehearsal, and editing processes, students develop a full-length play scenario to fulfillment in a produced play.


Teaching (Undergraduate)


EDUC 480 Special Topics in Education The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each course focuses on various issues in education and allows students to pursue individual projects related to the subject of the course. Prerequisite(s): Varies according to the topic.


Teaching (Graduate)


EDUC 710 Fundamentals of Teaching, Learning, and Assessment This course uses a learner-centered structure to facilitate an understanding of teaching, learning, and assessment in the arts and technology. In conjunction with formal learning in the classroom, candidates spend 60 hours in the field, assisting with P-12 classes.


EDUC 712 Human Learning and Development Knowledge of human growth and development pro- vides the foundation for a teacher’s ability to establish developmentally appropriate learning environments. This course offers an overview of human growth pat- terns, emphasizing the child and adolescent stages, with a focus on how to use the arts to stimulate


cognitive and meta-cognitive development. The impli- cations of brain research for classroom practice also are included. Candidates spend 20 hours in the field, observing a range of age groups.


EDUC 714 Applied Field Experience Candidates create lessons together, utilizing the con- cept of lesson study and the techniques of experiential aesthetic education. They use procedures for collab- orative inquiry to look at student work and professional practice. Educational experiences occur in museums galleries, and performing arts venues where the lessons developed relate to public performances, exhibitions, and community concerns. Interdisciplinary learning and technology integration are stressed. This course involves 40 hours of field experience.


EDUC 720 Art Methods I With a focus on grades P-8, teacher candidates learn about the role of art in the schools, strategies for motivation and management of individual and group learning experiences in an art classroom, and how to develop standards-based lessons and units of study that stem from the “big ideas” that connect the prin- ciples of art making with their cultural, historical, and philosophical contexts. Candidates spend 8 hours per week in an elementary or middle school, assisting an art teacher. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 710, EDUC 712, EDUC 714.


EDUC 721 Drama Methods I With a focus on grades P-8, candidates learn about the role of performing arts in society and in the schools, strategies for motivation and management of indi- vidual and group learning experiences in a classroom, and how to develop standards-based lessons and units of study that stem from “big ideas” that connect the principles of performing arts with their cultural, his- torical, and philosophical contexts. Candidates spend 8 hours per week in an elementary or middle school, assisting a classroom teacher with the integration of performing arts content into other content knowledge, or with a drama teacher focusing strictly on performing arts. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 710, EDUC 712, EDUC 714.


EDUC 722 Dimensions of a Multicultural Learning Environment With a focus on the linguistic, cultural, social, and his- torical dimensions of a multicultural classroom, teacher candidates explore the implications of these factors for learning in the arts. Candidates examine their own dispositions toward those from different cultures. In conjunction with learning the course content, candi- dates work in classrooms with diverse or specialized populations such as English as a Second Language learners for 3 hours per week, assisting with arts proj- ects. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 710, EDUC 712, EDUC 714.


EDUC 730 Art Methods II with Student Teaching With a focus on grades 9-12, candidates learn about strategies for motivation and management of individ- ual and group learning experiences in an art classroom, and how to develop standards-based lessons and units of study that stem from “big ideas” that connect the principles of art making with their cultural, historical, and philosophical contexts. Candidates spend 8 hours per week working with a high school art teacher. At week six of the term, candidates enter the first stage of student teaching, develop a unit of study, and finalize their process portfolio for faculty review. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 720, EDUC 722.


EDUC 731 Drama Methods II with Student Teaching With a focus on grades 9-12, candidates learn about strategies for motivation and management of indi- vidual and group learning experiences in a high school performing arts class, and how to develop standards- based lessons and units of study that stem from “big ideas” that connect the principles of art making with their cultural, historical, and philosophical contexts. Candidates spend 8 hours per week working with a high school performing arts teacher. At week six of the term, candidates enter the first stage of student teaching, develop a unit of study, and finalize their process portfolio for faculty review. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 721, EDUC 722.


EDUC 732 Educating for All Students This course covers topics including individualized instruction, identification of students with special needs, familiarity with special education law, familiarity with varied learning styles, identification of multiple intelligences, giftedness, and ability to differentiate instruction. In conjunction with learning the course content, candidates work in a specialized classroom, an inclusion classroom, or a school with a specialized population for 3 hours per week, assisting with art projects. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 720 or EDUC 721, and EDUC 722.


EDUC 734 Studio Practice and Teaching Teachers practicing in the arts can participate in a circle of inspiration that enriches their students’ learn- ing as well as their own. This course helps candidates identify practical strategies and insights gained in the classroom to support personal studio practice and, in turn, augment teaching. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 720 or EDUC 721.


EDUC 735 Topics in Pedagogy From establishing goals to achieving outcomes, teaching and learning is a creative interplay between meeting course objectives and cultivating artistic expression. This course introduces potential college- level instructors to basic principles of college-level teaching, learning, and assessment. Students explore current issues in higher education while learning the fundamentals of classroom management, course development, critique, and how to establish a dynamic learning environment that fosters creative exploration, critical thinking, and group dialog.


EDUC 740 Student Teaching Beginning with a period of observation and assistance that leads to assuming full responsibility for all teaching duties, candidates spend 10 weeks in an extended clini- cal practice. Student teaching begins one week before the SCAD term starts. Candidates maintain the school schedule of vacations and holidays.


EDUC 742 Action Research After studying some of the basic principles and theo- ries of action research, candidates pose questions about their own practice in relationship to student learning. Questions raised and evidence gathered dur- ing clinical practice form the content focus for study. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 730 or EDUC 731.


EDUC 744 Portfolio Seminar Portfolio seminar accompanies student teaching and allows candidates to reflect on their clinical practice and their developing expertise as educators. Guided by the 8 program outcomes, candidates assemble the evidence necessary to demonstrate their preparedness to begin teaching.


EDUC 780 Special Topics in Education The topic of this course varies from term to term. Each course focuses on various issues in education and allows graduate students to pursue individual projects related to the subject of the course. Faculty, course content, and prerequisites vary each time the course is offered.


Electronic Design (Undergraduate)


ELDS 205 Computer-aided Product Design This course introduces students to principles of com- puter usage related to the product design professions. The class covers the use of network operating systems, operating systems, e-mail, word processing, and digital manipulation of scanned images, 2-D drafting and 3-D modeling to communicate product-oriented form.


ELDS 225 Electronic Design I This course introduces students to personal computer usage related to the building design professions. It cov- ers the use of network operating systems, operating systems, e-mail, word processing, digital manipulation of scanned images, 2-D drafting, and 3-D modeling to communicate building-oriented form. Prerequisite(s): DRAW 115 or FURN 232.


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