This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Furniture Design (Graduate)


FURN 706 Exploration in Plastics Plastics and plastics processes will be covered in the context of a wide range of applications and within a variety of industries. Through lectures, case studies, demonstrations, and small-scale exercises and proj- ects, students become familiar with the vocabulary of plastics and plastics design. Criteria for the design of plastic components and identification of processing methods will be discussed and applied.


FURN 708 3-D Computer-aided Design for Furniture Through this course, students become proficient in industry-standard modeling software applications, and how they allow for quick, accurate, and transformable visualization of designs as a tool to facilitate communi- cation between designer, engineer, and client.


FURN 709 Materials, Processes and Application A broad familiarity of furniture and accessory materials, processes and application is important for the designer. Materials and manufacturing methods unique to the furnishings industry as well as those common in other fields are covered in this course. Students learn and apply technical and practical considerations influenc- ing the choice of material and production methods for furnishings. The role and influence of the designer is examined in the context of manufactured products.


FURN 710 Issues in Furniture Design Through a series of lectures and discussions, students establish systematic methods of concept development and market analysis. The understanding and use of these tools as they relate to current issues and trends in furniture design become the framework in which, as professional designers, students can successfully develop design briefs and tackle industry problems.


FURN 718 Furniture Studio I: Conceptual Studies Through a series of proposals and design briefs, stu- dents exercise their conceptual skills in solving com- plex, open-ended design problems that challenge their imaginative capabilities. By developing an awareness of the higher-order of cognitive processes and con- necting to their individual creative spark, students are encouraged to enhance their potential to substantially contribute to the field of Furniture Design.


FURN 732 Evolution of Furniture Design Presented in a manner that informs and complements their design intentions, innovative interventions, and creative intelligence, this course provides students an understanding of major design proponents, move- ments and historical trajectories relevant to furniture design. The course draws upon the historical lineage of furniture design and identifies the predominant break- throughs, materials and techniques throughout history, with specific emphasis on theoretical and ideological developments and the effects of such historical events.


FURN 738 Furniture Studio II : Contextual Studies The focus of this course is to identify and respond to design problems through an investigation of either a predetermined or a proposed context. Students develop comprehensive documentation of sources, analysis, and synthesis that supports the intended design solution and demonstrate an understanding of material, functional and aesthetic requirements in the execution of the course project. Prerequisite(s): FURN 718.


FURN 742 Directed Research in Furniture Design As the result of extensive research, students dem- onstrate the ability to pursue an inclusive concept development process, including the core components of research methodology, analysis, and material inte- gration. The process culminates in a written state- ment for presentation to the M.F.A. 45-hour review and a narrative draft to accompany a body of work. Prerequisite(s): FURN 738.


FURN 748 Furniture Studio III: Material Investigations The focus of this course is to conduct research on new information and develop new usage of emerging


materials. The information gleaned from research is used in the presentation and execution of a viable design solution. Prerequisite(s): FURN 738.


FURN 749 Furniture Design M.A. Final Project All M.A. students in furniture design are required to complete a final portfolio project that represents the culmination of their academic program. Prerequisite(s): FURN 738.


FURN 754 Directed Studies I Application of learned research methodologies and demonstration of in-depth knowledge on furniture design form the basis for this course. The student plans and undertakes the first phase of the intended body of work for their graduate project leading to fully realized forms and the accompanying support documentation. Prerequisite(s): FURN 742.


FURN 760 Experimental Metal Fabrication This course teaches advanced procedures in the exploration of metal manipulation, machine safety and fabrication. Proper use of hand tools, metal identifica- tion and cold assembly techniques are addressed.


FURN 762 Experimental Wood Fabrication This course is an intensive learning exploration cen- tered on woodworking techniques where the ideation process and fabrication method examines the intrinsic properties of wood and the challenges extended by the variety of wood-working tools and machines. Students enrolled in the program also develop research and critical thinking skills, learn the effective use of visual and verbal presentation medium, and understand the integration of concept, human dimension require- ments, technical considerations and necessary safety procedures in fabrication.


FURN 764 Directed Studies II Evaluation, refinement and focus of the topic investiga- tion provide opportunities for the student to build on the first phase of the graduate thesis project. Deeper analysis, investigation and understanding is reflected in the execution, presentation and documentation of the second phase of the graduate project and exhibit planning. Prerequisite(s): FURN 754.


FURN 767 Furniture Design Merchandising Through a series of lectures and seminars, this course enables students to identify, challenge and explore new concepts and design competencies within the parameters of markets and opportunities. The course also addresses trends and forecasting, patterns of domestic competition, practices in international import and export, packaging and transport of products. Stu- dents are exposed to case studies covering customer buying systems and hierarchies of needs, behavioral tendencies and cultural diversities, price determinants and market cost factors.


FURN 768 Visual Communication for Furniture Design This course equips students with the skills to concep- tualize and communicate ideas and design intentions through drawing and effective visual communication tools. Students are introduced to a range of drawing and visual presentation techniques through studio- based exercises.


FURN 769 Soft Furnishings Students acquire knowledge of sewing technology, patternmaking, structural design, and upholstery techniques, and conceptualize, develop, design and execute a soft furnishing ensemble constructed from available and alternative materials applicable to varied aesthetic and functional purpose.


FURN 770 Professional Practices in Furniture Design In this course, students prepare to enter their career field. Topics include developing professional contacts, interviewing skills, portfolio and refined résumés. Graduate students develop a comprehensive package to prepare for employment, based on improved skill sets and capabilities. In-class learning is augmented by visiting furniture manufacture and design facilities in the area.


FURN 779F Graduate Field Internship Students in this course undertake a field assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


FURN 779T Graduate Teaching Internship Students in this course undertake a teaching assign- ment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good aca- demic standing.


FURN 790 Furniture Design M.F.A. Thesis All furniture design M.F.A. students are required to develop and prepare an exhibition of an original, cohe- sive body of work. Students must showcase four to six pieces supported by a written component.


Graphic Design (Undergraduate)


GRDS 201 Introduction to Graphic Design This course combines studio work with classroom instruction. Fundamental components of design theory and typography are incorporated with problem defini- tion to provide students with valuable experience in the ideation, research, execution and presentation of projects. Lectures and visual media provide a broad introduction to the visual communication professional field. Prerequisite(s): DRAW 101, DSGN 101.


GRDS 205 Typography I Through lectures, demonstrations and studio work, students are introduced to all aspects of typography, from its historical precedents to its current use. Cre- ative thinking is encouraged, along with prescribed techniques and media. Prerequisite(s): ADVE 130 or GRDS 201 or ITGM 130 or MOME 130.


GRDS 229 History of Graphic Design This course surveys the pivotal events and achieve- ments that led to the current state of graphic com- munication. The unceasing quest to give form to ideas is traced from the pictographs painted on cave walls to the latest imaginative designs. Through lectures, videotapes, discussions, presentations and research, students are introduced to the creative thinkers, impor- tant innovations and breakthrough technologies that have shaped the evolution of visual communication. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110.


GRDS 233 Vector and Raster Graphics This class provides students with skills needed to pro- duce vector and raster-based graphics. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the nature of vector and raster-based digital file development, as well as an in-depth study of the applications used to create them. Projects and assignments will focus on an exploration and understanding of the applications, applying color, tools, techniques and printing options.


GRDS 243 Digital Page and Web Graphics In this course, students focus on making pages, both for print and Internet environments. Correct usage of the appropriate software tools, terminology and theory of page layout are emphasized and covered in sufficient detail to understand the differences between the two layout strategies. Multiple-page documents/ Web sites, media incorporation, output and publish- ing techniques for the two environments are the core concepts of this class. Readings, exercises and assignments focus on the acquisition of these skills. Prerequisite(s): GRDS 205.


GRDS 348 Graphic Design Studio I In this course, students develop ideational, creative and methodological strategies for problem solving. The focus is on improving design knowledge and skills, as well as introducing students to project management disciplines. Prerequisite(s): GRDS 233, GRDS 243.


GRDS 353 Typography II Through readings, writing assignments, lectures and studio projects, students explore a history of typogra- phy and its relationship to cultural, geo-socio-political and psychological dynamics of information exchange. The ideas of intellectual impact, complex hierarchy,


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310  |  Page 311  |  Page 312  |  Page 313  |  Page 314  |  Page 315  |  Page 316  |  Page 317  |  Page 318  |  Page 319  |  Page 320  |  Page 321  |  Page 322  |  Page 323  |  Page 324  |  Page 325  |  Page 326  |  Page 327  |  Page 328  |  Page 329  |  Page 330  |  Page 331  |  Page 332  |  Page 333  |  Page 334  |  Page 335  |  Page 336  |  Page 337  |  Page 338  |  Page 339  |  Page 340  |  Page 341  |  Page 342  |  Page 343  |  Page 344  |  Page 345  |  Page 346  |  Page 347  |  Page 348  |  Page 349  |  Page 350  |  Page 351  |  Page 352  |  Page 353  |  Page 354  |  Page 355  |  Page 356  |  Page 357  |  Page 358  |  Page 359  |  Page 360  |  Page 361  |  Page 362  |  Page 363  |  Page 364  |  Page 365  |  Page 366  |  Page 367  |  Page 368  |  Page 369  |  Page 370  |  Page 371  |  Page 372  |  Page 373  |  Page 374  |  Page 375  |  Page 376  |  Page 377  |  Page 378  |  Page 379  |  Page 380  |  Page 381  |  Page 382  |  Page 383  |  Page 384
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com