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Reports BRAZIL - MARKET REPORT


Magistrates for the local Criminals Appeals Panel ruled that gaming did not constitute a criminal offence because the 1941 law, which outlawed gambling as part of Brazil’s Criminal Contravention Act, violated principles laid out in the 1988 Constitution. Bingo hall owners were acquitted.


Provisional Measure 923/2020, approved by Bolsonaro. Te text modified Law No. 5,768 which dates back to 1971, and regulates prize draws on national open television channels. Although the amendment was not approved, this and other measures, especially in the courts, adds more pressure on the government to update gambling regulation.


Additionally proposed changes to the law were submitted to the STF by the Partido Humanista da Solidariedade (Humanist Party of Solidarity) in January 2019 and aim to nullify laws which make the private operation of gambling illegal. According to a party statement, gaming laws covered by Article 50 and decree Law No 9215 of 1946 (which cover morality and good customs), go against the fundamental right of equality provided for in article 5 of the Federal Constitution. Te Brazilian constitution was rewritten in 1988 after civilian rule returned to Brazil and sought to guarantee individual rights.


In April 2019, Bolsonaro said that the ruling on whether gambling should be legalised should be in the hands of the legislature as opposed to the courts. All the same, the issue is under consideration because of a case submitted to the STF, which centres around bingo. In 2017, a number of bingo halls in Porto Alegre, the capital of the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, reopened after local state magistrates ruled


P74 WIRE / PULSE / INSIGHT / REPORTS


in their favour arguing that the 1941 law violates principles laid out in the 1988 Constitution.


Magistrates for the local Criminal Appeals Panel ruled that gaming did not constitute a criminal offence because the 1941 law, which outlawed gambling as part of Brazil’s Criminal Contravention Act, violated principles laid out in the 1988 Constitution. Bingo hall owners were acquitted and the state Public Prosecution Service appealed the acquittals to the STF.


Te STF then had to decide whether the discussion on banning gambling, by the Criminal Prohibitions Act of 1941, had what is known according to local legal terms “general repercussions.” Te concept of general repercussion is intended to ensure that only questions that are truly relevant to Brazilian society are heard by the court, as its primary duty is to protect and uphold the Federal Constitution. Tis was after the rapporteur for the case, Minister Luiz Fux, decided to put the


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