This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
56 Music BA (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) Entry Requirements


CAO Code DN500 BA – Joint Honours – full time


Leaving Certificate Passes in six subjects including English, Irish, A third language and three other recognised subjects, of which two must be minimum HC3.


Average 2010 CAO Points 415 Minimum 2010 CAO Points 365


A-Level/GCSE Entry Requirements Pages 176/177


Average Places 30 Length of Programme 3 Years


Progression Entry Routes (DN500/DN501) FETAC Entry Route — Yes See www.ucd.ie/myucd/fetac


IT Transfer Route — None


CAO Code DN501 BA – Joint Honours – part time (day)


Entry Requirements as above.


CAO Code DN517 Direct Entry


Subject Entry Requirements as above.


Average CAO Points 2010 430 Minimum CAO Points 2010 335


A-Level/GCSE Entry Requirements Pages 176/177


Average Intake 10


Length of Programme 3 Years Note: DN517 is a restricted application course, meaning applicants must apply by 1 February CAO deadline. There will also be an entrance test for students applying to Music DN517, designed to test basic historical and theoretical knowledge, and aural and analytical skills. You DO NOT need to sit this test if you are applying to DN500.


Choosing Music Music can be taken as part of a BA Joint Honours degree (DN500), or as a single subject honours BMus degree (DN517). It can also be taken part time (DN501). Check out the subjects you can study with Music by looking at the diagram on page 33. Details of how to apply for these combinations, as part of DN500, are on page 184. If you choose the BA degree, but decide during first year that you want to study Music as a single honours degree, you may transfer to the BMus, subject to achieving good grades at the end of first year. Additionally, following completion of the BA, students may add a BMus degree with the completion of another year.


Why is this subject for me? Music at UCD covers four main areas of study: musicology, ethnomusicology, music theory and performance. Musicology embraces the histori- cal and cultural study of music; ethnomusicology explores world music and music in culture; music theory deals with the analysis of musical struc- ture. Tere are also three performing ensembles in which students can participate for credit: the UCD Choral Scholars, the UCD Symphony Orchestra and the UCD Philharmonic Choir. Te UCD School of Music offers two pathways


to a degree in Music. If you have a very strong commitment to music and wish to pursue it pro- fessionally, entry through DN517 allows you to focus your studies on music as a single subject honours degree for which you will be awarded the BMus degree. Alternatively, studying music as part of the BA Joint Honours programme (DN500) allows you to study the subject as a joint major and gives you access to the full range of subjects in the BA programme.


What will I study? First Year


Music and Society • Teory and Analysis • Musicianship • Elective modules in musicology and performance


Second Year Music History • Teory and Analysis • Ethnomusicology • Elective modules in musi- cology and performance


Third Year Music History • Teory and Analysis • Ethnomusicology • Dissertation or recital • Elective modules in musicology and performance


Career & Graduate Study Opportunities Music graduates often pursue careers in: A Journalism


A Teaching music A Te recording industry


Further information


www.ucd.ie/myucd/arts music@ucd.ie


+353 1 716 8178 facebook.com/UCDLife Undergraduate Office, UCD School of Music, Newman Building, Belfield, Dublin 4


Ruth O’Mahony


Brady STUDENT


A Arts administration A Performers or composers A Academia, postgraduate study


BMus graduates often take their study of music further, and may proceed to graduate studies either at UCD or elsewhere. Te UCD School of Music offers a Master in Musicology (pathways in Musicology, Analysis or Ethnomusicology), MLitt and PhD.


International Study Opportunities Te UCD School of Music operates Erasmus exchange programmes with universities in Munich, Prague, Rouen and Leuven.


In my first year at UCD, I studied Music along with other subjects, but decided to transfer to the BMus degree programme in second year. Studying music in UCD involves several areas of music scholarship, so if you’re interested in music theory and analysis, world music, medieval


chant, musics of North America, opera, popular music and culture, or music of the Baroque era, there is lots to choose from. Although it is primarily a degree in musicology, there are still opportunities to perform in the Symphony Orchestra, Choral Scholars, and Philharmonic Choir – all of which make up UCD Performing Groups. Te UCD Music Society is also a great place to meet fellow musicians and get performance experience on campus.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196