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BIOLOGI CAL, BIOMEDI CAL & BIOMOLECULAR SCIENCES Microbiology BSc (Hons) (NFQ Level 8) CAO Code DN200 BBB


Entry Requirements Irish1, English, Mathematics2, One laboratory science subject3, Two other recognised subjects.


Leaving Certificate Passes in six subjects including those shown above, of which two must be minimum HC3.


Average CAO Points 2010 470 Minimum CAO Points 2010 435


A-Level/GCSE Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level.


Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAA (A-Level) & a (AS) or equivalent combination


Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades ABB (A-Level) & b (AS) or equivalent combination


Average Intake 380 Length of Programme 4 Years


Progression Entry Routes FETAC Entry Route — Yes See www.ucd.ie/myucd/fetac


IT Transfer Route — Yes See www.ucd.ie/myucd/transfer


1 A-Level candidates are usually exempt from the Irish Language Requirement.


2 Minimum Grade OB3/HD3 in Leaving Certificate or equivalent.


3 Minimum Grade OB3/HD3 in Leaving Certificate or equivalent. Applied Mathematics may be used instead of a Laboratory Science subject.


Other programmes of interest


Biochemistry & Molecular Biology


Pharmacology


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Further information


Professor Wim Meijer UCD School of Biomolecular & Biomedical Science Ardmore House Belfield, Dublin 4


learn about microbes that cause diseases, clean up environmental spills and produce antibiotics.


understand how we engineer fungi and bacteria to produce a vast array of compounds, ranging from antibiotics and hormones to washing powder.


Why is this course for me? Microbiology is the study of microscopic organ- isms known as micro-organisms or microbes. Microbes play a key role in every facet of life on this planet. For example, microbes have a major impact on the Earth’s climate by their metabo- lism of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane. Microbes can be engineered to produce bioplastics and antibiotics or to clean up chemically polluted soil and water. Microbes protect us from colonisation by disease-caus- ing organisms. However, some microbes cause disease, e.g. MRSA, AIDS, tuberculosis and meningitis. Microbiological research aims to find treatments for these and other infectious diseases.


What will I study? Tis is a sample pathway for a degree in Microbiology. Topics include biotechnology, microbes and the environment, medical micro- biology and pharmaceutical microbiology. First Year Chemistry • Biology • Mathematics • Optional Science modules • Elective modules Second Year Microbiology • Chemistry • Mathematics • Elective modules Third Year Microbiology • Elective modules Fourth Year Microbiology • (Includes a research project in a research or industrial laboratory)


Professional Work Experience Students carry out a research project in fourth year that can take place in a pharmaceutical or food-related company or a hospital. Recent place- ments include Pfizer, Wyeth, Trinity Biotech and Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin.


Career & Graduate Study Opportunities Microbiologists are employed in the healthcare, pharmaceutical and food-related industries, hospitals and veterinary hospitals and related laboratories and government agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency where they are involved in research and development,


Pile of petri dishes waiting to cool down. The media is XLD, used for Salmonella spp. Image by Mr Pablo Rojas. ©UCD


process design and control, management and quality control. Many students opt to continue their undergraduate degree with a MSc or PhD graduate programme. Tese microbiologists play a key role in developing new drugs, finding novel ways to combat infectious diseases and designing new approaches to clean the environ- ment and develop a green economy.


International Study Opportunities A limited number of fourth year projects are available in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.


Conor


Brennan STUDENT


I saw Microbiology as a discipline with limitless opportunity. From lab research to practical use in health or in industry, I felt the benefits of studying in this area were many and obvious.


KEY FAC T UCD Microbiology graduates are qualified to join the Academy of Medical Laboratory Science, which is a prerequisite to become a medical scientist.


UCD years, where my solid core background (in Microbiology) has helped me progress to my current position with one of the leading players in the international diagnostic industry.


“ I chose a manufacturing route after my


Dr Gavin Byrne, Production Lead with Trinity Biotech





www.ucd.ie/myucd/microbiology wim.meijer@ucd.ie


+353 1 716 6825 facebook.com/UCDScience


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