This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BIOLOGI CAL, BIOMEDI CAL & BIOMOLECULAR SCIENCES Genetics BSc (Hons) (NFQ Level 8)


explore molecular genetics and molecular biology, which are core components of modern biology and medicine, and form the basis of biotechnology.


Why is this course for me? If you’re interested in why some families are more prone to disease and how to use biotechnology to produce drugs and other products, then a degree in Genetics could be for you. Genetics is the sci- entific study of heredity – how information is passed from one generation to the next. You will study developing new areas, such as personal genomics using DNA sequence to determine health and ancestry. Te UCD Genetics degree programme also covers genetic engineering and biotechnology, transgenic animals, genetically modified plants, medical genetics, molecular evolution, developmental biology, DNA finger- printing and bioinformatics.


What will I study? Tis is a sample pathway for a degree in Genetics. Topics include evolution, genetic disease and biotechnology, as well as core modules in biomo- lecular and biomedical science.


First Year Biology • Chemistry • Mathematics • Optional Science modules • Elective modules Second Year Genetics • Chemistry • Mathematics • Elective modules Third Year Genetics • Elective modules Fourth Year Genetics • (Includes a research project)


Career & Graduate Study Opportunities Most Genetics graduates work in: A Hospital laboratories


A Biotechnology, pharmaceutical and genomics companies


A Forensic science laboratories A Agribiotech and horticulture companies A Food and drink companies


Many graduates study for a higher degree (MSc/ PhD), or obtain additional professional quali- fications such as in Medicine and Dentistry. MSc programmes at UCD include the areas of Biotechnology, Biotechnology and Business, and Evolutionary Biology.


Trasgenic zebrafish larvae. Image by Dr Yolande Alvarez. © UCD 2007


International Study Opportunities Genetics students in third year have to date studied in: A University of California, Irvine, USA


A University of Connecticut, USA A Queen’s University, Canada


Genetics students also have the opportunity to carry out their fourth year project at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.


Marie


McBrien STUDENT


I have always been interested in forensics and genetics from books, films and TV. I studied the International Baccalaureate, an international alternative to the Leaving Certificate, and took both Biology and Chemistry. I joined clubs and societies and,


like many scientists and engineers, I joined the Sub-aqua Club and learnt SCUBA diving. We’ve enjoyed weekend trips across Ireland and competed in intervarsities. I am now a third year Genetics student and enjoying the course immensely. Te lecturers are very approachable and helpful. Tere are great lab facilities and learning aids. I intend to continue my career in genetic research, and possibly obtain master’s and PhD degrees here in Ireland.


CAO Code DN200 BBB


Entry Requirements Irish1, English, Mathematics2, One laboratory science subject3, Two other recognised subjects.


Leaving Certificate Passes in six subjects including those shown above, of which two must be minimum HC3.


Average CAO Points 2010 470 Minimum CAO Points 2010 435


A-Level/GCSE Passes (GCSE Grade C or above) in six recognised subjects including those above, of which two must be minimum Grade C or above at A-Level.


Guideline Equivalent Average A-Level Grades AAA (A-Level) & a (AS) or equivalent combination


Guideline Equivalent Minimum A-Level Grades ABB (A-Level) & b (AS) or equivalent combination


Average Intake 380 Length of Programme 4 Years


Progression Entry Routes FETAC Entry Route — Yes See www.ucd.ie/myucd/fetac


IT Transfer Route — Yes See www.ucd.ie/myucd/transfer


1 A-Level candidates are usually exempt from the Irish Language Requirement.


2 Minimum Grade OB3/HD3 in Leaving Certificate or equivalent.


3 Minimum Grade OB3/HD3 in Leaving Certificate or equivalent. Applied Mathematics may be used instead of a Laboratory Science subject.


Other programmes of interest


Pharmacology


Biochemistry & Molecular Biology


118 112


Cell & Molecular Biology 113 Further information


www.ucd.ie/myucd/genetics geraldine.butler@ucd.ie


Professor Geraldine Butler UCD School of Biomolecular & Biomedical Science UCD Conway Institute of Biomolecular & Biomedical Research, Belfield, Dublin 4


+353 1 716 6885 facebook.com/UCDScience


115


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196