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DUBIT RESEARCH


mentioned any of the other kid-focused tablets.


ACCESS Awareness is one thing, but we want to know what children have access to. Just over half six to 12


year olds have access to an iPad (55 per cent) and 28 per cent have access to a Galaxy Tablet. While iPads and Galaxy tablets are often used by the whole family kid- focused tablets are primarily for young children, so we weren’t surprised to find that only nine per cent of children have access to a LeapPad and four per cent to an InnoTab. But if we only asked the


six year olds, we find that 22 per cent of them have access to one or the other.


WHAT DO CHILDREN REALLY THINK? We know it’s the parents


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that buy these devices but the views of children still play their part. That’s why we asked them to score each device they were aware of against a range of terms, such as: cool, safe, fun, and ‘looks good’. Against the likes of iPads and Android-based devices the child-focused tablets


highest for being ‘childish’, as we’d expect. Despite the iPad’s high price (which not all children may be aware of) all the devices scored around 3.6 for ‘value for money’ (five meaning the term was a perfect fit, and one meaning a bad fit). If we concentrate on the six and


The iPad was seen as the coolest and most mature of the tablets with the kid-focused tablets scoring highest for being ‘childish’, as expected.


scored poorly for being cool, fun and attractive – although they did perform stronger at the younger end of the spectrum. The iPad was seen as the coolest and most mature of the tablets with the kid- focused tablets scoring


seven year olds the LeapPad is seen as marginally more fun and cooler than the InnoTab. The kid-focused tablets


perform better with this age group but are still out classed by the iPad and Kindle Fire.


THE FUTURE If you thought the world was awash with tablets already, 2014 will surprise you as 35 per cent of parents of children aged six to 12 are planning to buy an iPad in the next 12 months.


But it’s not all about


iPads – 29 per cent expect to buy a Galaxy tablet, 24 per cent a Kindle Fire and 17 per cent expect to get a Hudl over the same period. Looking at the kid-


focused tablets, ten per cent expect to buy either a LeapPad or an InnoTab. It’s clear to see that for


children and their parents the iPad is the cream of the crop – children think it’s the coolest and the most fun of all tablets. But while the word tablet used to just be another word for iPad we should expect to see not only a growing tablet


market but also an increase in diversity. If you’re developing a


new IP or toy the chance that your target market also interacts with a tablet device is becoming almost certain.


Dubit is a youth research agency and digital development studio. By utilising a deep understanding of young people’s motivations and behaviours, Dubit works with brand owners to create digital experiences that children love. Phone: 0113 394 7920 Email: research@dubitlimited.com


January/February 27


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