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news digest ♦ LEDs


HEMT MMIC high power amplifier (HPA) for satellite communication applications at the 2011 IEEE International Microwave Symposium held June 7-9 in Baltimore. The demonstration product offers dramatic performance improvements over existing commercially-available GaAs MESFET transistors or Traveling Wave Tube-based amplifiers.


“This is the first GaN MMIC to be demonstrated that offers game-changing performance for satellite communication applications due to the outstanding linear efficiency and power gains provided by our GaN HEMT technology. We anticipate our GaN products will have a large impact on how thermal management is approached and will enable reductions in both size and weight for commercial and military satellite communication systems,” said Jim Milligan, Cree, director of RF.


The CMPA5585025F MMIC is a 50 ohm (Ω), 25 watt peak power two-stage GaN HEMT HPA in a multi-pin ceramic/metal package (1”x 0.38”). The instantaneous bandwidth of operation of the MMIC is 5.8 GHz to 8.4 GHz. It provides 15 watts of linear power (less than-30 dBc adjacent channel power) with 20 dB power gain. Power added efficiency is 25% at this linear operating power.


The device offers superior linear efficiency (up to 60% higher than conventional solutions) in a small footprint package facilitating reductions in transmitter size and weight with lower cost thermal management. In addition, because this device operates at higher voltages than GaAs MESFETs (e.g., 28 volts versus 12 volts), the transistors draw less current, resulting in lower power distribution losses and higher overall system efficiencies.


Samples of the CMPA5585025F are available now, and production release is targeted for the summer of 2011. For additional product information, visit www.cree.com/rf.


Osram adds low-power range LED to portfolio


The < 1 W LEDs display uniform illumination in linear and flat lighting solutions.


The new product family in the low-power range 58 www.compoundsemiconductor.net October 2011


The new Duris E 3 from Osram Opto Semiconductors can be retrofitted as replacements for conventional T5 and T8 fluorescent lamps. The light has the same appearance as a continuous strip of light


Duris E 3 has been designed specifically for applications that call for uniform distribution of light, high efficiency and low procurement costs. The main areas of application are therefore lighting systems in industry, such as open-plan offices, production facilities, conference rooms and warehouses that have been equipped with T5 and T8 luminaires. “Bright LEDs are also recommended for smaller offices, shop lighting and signage”, said Andreas Vogler, Product Manager SSL at Osram Opto Semiconductors. “This new LED extends our portfolio in the low-power range and offers the usual high Osram quality.”


Duris E 3 offers everything that is needed for uniform light. Its small size of 3 mm x 1.4 mm means that they can be placed very close to one


from Osram Opto Semiconductors starts with the Duris E 3. The small dimensions and wide beam angle of these new LEDs make them ideal for applications that require uniform illumination. These highly efficient LEDs can be used as replacements for conventional fluorescent lamps in T5 or T8 luminaires.


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