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operations at Naga World. It resumed limited VIP and slot operations from July 8 after restrictions were eased, but resumed full mass gaming operations from July 21 in both Naga1 and Naga2.


Making the news worldwide, there were staff strikes earlier this year after casino union leader Chhim Sithar was suspended over a campaign for higher wagers. Employees were asking for a monthly wage increase to $300 for hotel staff and $500 for casino floor workers. Te staff are currently paid $200 maximum and $300 maximum respectively.


Tey returned to work in January after a deal was arranged between the reinstated union president and NagaWorld. Workers salaries were increased by 18-30 per cent. A previous strike over wages in September resulted in a ‘no deal’ after NagaCorp secured an injunction declaring the strike illegal and workers were


forced to return to work with no salary increase. When NagaWorld closed due to the pandemic, around 200 employees submitted a petition to the Ministry of Labour requesting their $40 payment per month allotted to workers in sectors hit hard by the lockdown. Around 90 per cent of NagaWorld’s 9,000 staff had to take out loans to cope during the closure.


Te employees demonstrated outside the Ministry building to protest a decision by NagaCorp to halt the partial salary payment it began to make from April. NagaCorp initially


paid 50 per cent of their salaries, but this was halted in June leaving most staff with no income. Workers in the garment and tourism industry were still receiving a $40 a month government payment.


Union leader Sithar had suggested several options, including a 30 per cent wage amount and a 20 per cent loan on future salaries, enabling staff to lend $300 a month until work resumed or a loan to swap for future holidays, whilst staff would repay any loans from future salaries at a 10 per cent deduction rate.


NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA P99


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