search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
integrated resorts may be developed under the Gaming Law.


Licensing – the LMCG sets out a dual licence structure which allows the separation of the development and ownership of the property from the operation of its casino. A successful applicant will enter into an IR development agreement with the RGC. Te maximum number of IRs and the minimum investment obligations will be determined by the RGC. A casino licence may be issued for a period of no more than five years (in a Favoured zone) or 20 years (in a Promoted zone).


Regulator – the LMCG establishes the Integrated Resort Management and Commercial Gambling Committee (“GMC”). Te GMC is the government body responsible for defining gaming policy, issue regulations, approve games, collect gaming revenue, issue licences and generally supervise and enforce gaming laws and regulations. With its over-arching powers and all its seven members being ministry appointees, it is hard to describe the GMC as an independent regulator


The LMCG will not allow Cambodian nationals to participate in gaming or to enter casinos. While this


restriction may deter some potential investors from entering the market, it is no different from what already exists today. Moreover, with a per capita GDP at approximately US$1,500 per year, it is doubtful that any significant investment would base its strategy in attracting local participants.


with western-style checks and balances.


Gaming Promotion – junkets will be allowed to operate in Cambodia, subject to incorporating a local entity and registering with the GMC. As in Macau, licences will be valid for one year. Te extension of credit for gaming will be permitted


for foreigners not residing in the Kingdom. In a regional context, where junket regulations are becoming increasingly stringent, a more relaxed licensing environment may help Cambodia boost its VIP business on the short term.


Participation – Te LMCG will not allow Cambodian nationals to participate in gaming or to enter casinos. While this restriction may deter some potential investors from entering the market, it is no different from what already exists today. Moreover, with a per capita GDP at approximately US$1,500 per year, it is doubtful that any significant investment would base its strategy in attracting local participants.


Tax – Casino operators will pay taxes over GGR. Although the rate has not yet been officially revealed, recent reports place it at seven per cent for operators grandfathered by the LMCG, while new integrated resorts will have a split rate of seven per cent for mass-market and four per cent for the VIP segment. If confirmed, Cambodia will be, one of the most-competitive regulated markets in Asia from a tax standpoint.


NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA P103


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144