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At NagaWorld, for example, all employees and visitors must wear a mask and are required to have their body temperatures checked before entering. Te company has installed infrared body temperature sensors with sanitisers inside and at every gaming table. Plus there are scheduled disinfection cleaning schedules for public areas. Social distancing is practised with tables in restaurants spaced.


THE FUTURE OUTLOOK On the positive side the new gambling law,


which was drafted nine years ago, is slowly making its way through the various procedures and was approved at cabinet level at the beginning of July and now goes through to Parliament for rubber stamping.


Te Law on Management of Integrated Resorts and Commercial Gambling (LMIRCG or LMCG) aims to ensure the gaming industry can be developed in the correct manner, as up until now these regulatory standards have fallen on individual operators. Te key elements of the LMIRCG will:


l Divide Cambodia into three zones –


Prohibited, Promoted and Permitted/Favoured. Te construction of Integrated Resorts will only be allowed in Promoted zones such as Sihanoukville and Koh Kong and adjacent islands. Casinos in Permitted locations such as


P94 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA


Around 100 factories have since closed down their businesses with 100,000 workers laid off, about 16 per cent of total garment workers. On the other hand small and medium


enterprises are re-starting their operations and the country is now heavily reliant on local


consumption with little or no foreign money entering the country.


border casinos will be grandfathered, but will have to undertake certain reforms, whilst the rest of the Prohibited areas will be preserved for cultural and religious reasons.


l Te LMIRCG will also create an Integrated


Resorts Management and Commercial Gambling Committee (GMC) to regulate the sector. Tese will be in charge of licensing, collecting taxes


and approvals. Licensing will separate the development and ownership of the property from the operation of the casinos.


l Junkets or Gaming Trade Promoters can


operate subject to registering, whilst Cambodian nationals will still not be permitted to gamble or enter casinos. Taxes will be paid on GGR.


Riu Pinto Proença, a partner with the Macau based law firm of MdME was part of a team, together with experts Peter Cohen and David Green, advising the government in matters of gaming policy and legislation. He outlines in more detail aspects of the changes and what they will involve in his column on page 102.


Although the government has not revealed the draft approval by Cabinet, it is reported to be extremely similar to the one presented for industry consultation back in 2016.


Tis law could help Cambodia rebuild its gambling industry. Over the last two years Cambodia has gone through a transition reaching lower middle income status in 2015.


Te economy is driven by garment exports, construction, real estate, agriculture and tourism with an average growth rate of eight per cent between 1998 and 2018. Per Capita GDP was around $1,500 last year.


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