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Insight


COPING WITH COVID SuzoHapp


The future of payments in a post-Covid 19 environment


Contributing to the discussion around the future of payments with the gaming sector, Sim Bielak, President of Global Gaming and Amusement Business, shares his thoughts on the way the pandemic has shifted the dynamic surrounding card, card and contactless payments within venues


Sim Bielak President of Global Gaming and Amusement Business, SUZOHAPP


Sim Bielak has been with SUZOHAPP for over seven years and was tapped for his experience in the gaming sector. Bielak has an extensive background in sales, business development and marketing. He joined SUZOHAPP in 2013 and previously served in the role of Chief Marketing Officer. Prior to SUZOHAPP, Bielak ran the global gaming business for Crane Payment Solutions.


While COVID-19 has certainly made people wary of surface touch-points and interactions, we are definitely not at the point of eliminating cash or paper tickets entirely.


Te gaming industry has a long history and a wide variety of atmospheres and clientele. For many, placing bets with physical cash evokes a sense of nostalgia and familiarity that is highly desired in times of so much change and uncertainty.


However, customers and operators alike are significantly more interested in at least providing the options for minimised people-to-people interactions. Whether this be with mobile or contactless payments at each machine or through kiosks, we will likely see more options given to keep people socially distanced and protected.


Te extent to which people want to take


Cashless options also carry the perception of newness that use the implication of innovation to their advantage. While many of these technologies have been available for a while, the public’s willingness to adopt has been low so those technologies never caught on for the mainstream public. P64 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA


precautionary measures is a personal and individual decision so providing options to do so will keep customers happy.


COVID-19 has assuredly instigated a more expedited shift than we likely would have seen without the pandemic. Although cash and paper tickets have been shown to have a lower likelihood of transmission than credit cards given their smooth plastic surface, the perception of cash has taken a nosedive in terms of viral safety regardless of the science.


As many have stated, one of the most crucial requirements of rebuilding the economy is making customers feel safe in their day to day interactions so perception holds a lot of power in this situation therefore it makes sense that we’ve seen more cashless payment options emerge.


Cashless options also carry the perception of newness that use the implication of innovation to their advantage. While many of these technologies have been available for a while, the public’s willingness to adopt has been low so those technologies never caught on for the mainstream public.


If anything, what the pandemic has shown is that people are a lot more adaptable now as we’ve all been forced to adapt to our 'new normal'.


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