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Lewis Pek Editor


Comment September 2020


Amongst the myriad of high publicity campaigns promoted during and since lockdown aimed at saving zoos and museums, fund-raising to help national treasures and stately homes to remain in operation - I haven’t seen one to help a retail gaming venue. So many stories we’ve published on Newswire talk about the number of venues that remain closed. Is it taboo to even think about saving a retail gaming venue?


I appreciate that many of the museums, theatres and music venues have been loss- making for years, which is the same for many gaming venues, and that Covid-19 is a catalyst for these concerns to take stock. Casinos have often been criticised for being museums to gaming, time-capsules from by-gone age in which little has changed barring the addition of slot machines. But if these were museums or theatres, there would be public outcries at the loss of heritage and culture, of local entertainment. If these were stately homes then fund-raising would be swiftly organised and attempts made to prevent the loss of cultural heritage.


The fundamental inability of the industry to create positive local and national PR means that there’s little to no public sense of loss. Will anyone mourn the closing of


THE INABILITY OF THE INDUSTRY TO CREATE POSITIVE LOCAL AND NATIONAL PR MEANS THERE’S LITTLE TO NO PUBLIC SENSE OF LOSS


gaming operations? Shouldn’t we feel terrible? Well, forget the buildings, it’s the loss of jobs, of amazing people doing the thing the love that we should really mourn. The biggest casualties are not the buildings, but the people that fill these spaces and deliver the entertainment, service and hospitality to visitors. Statistics pile up and don’t show the individual human cost of each layoff and redundancy. My LinkedIn account currently looks like an Open For Work green rash that’s faster spreading than Covid-19.


It’s the casual disregard for the people working in the gaming industry, some of the brightest, warmest, brilliant-at-what-they-do people, that’s really shocking. The fact that no one cares about the closure of gaming halls, LBOs and casinos is tragic, but the loss of the living breathing environments that staff and clients have built over generations at their local venues is upsetting.


The gaming industry doesn’t garner sympathy and support from the public. It struggles to present a case for its existence at the best of times, but during the present crisis, the fact that so many businesses are struggling and needing help - with none coming - is depressing. There’s too much “good riddance,” and not enough understanding of what’s actually being lost.


EDITORIAL


G3 Magazine Editor Lewis Pek


lewis@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0) 1942 879291


G3Newswire Editor Phil Martin


phil@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7801 967714


Features Editor Karen Southall


karensouthall@gmail.com


International Reporter James Marrison Staff Reporter William Bolton


william@gamingpublishing.com Contributors


Jessica Maier, Lucy Paterson,


Santiago Asensi Gisbert, Philippe Bon, Gregory Bower, Lloyd Levenson, Phil Sicuso


P6 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA ADVERTISING


Commercial Director John Slattery john@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7917 166471


Business Development Manager James Slattery james@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7814227219


Advertising Executive Alison Dronfield alison@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)1204 410771


PRODUCTION


Senior Designer Gareth Irwin


Production Manager Paul Jolleys


Subscriptions Manager Jennifer Pek


Commercial Administrator Lisa Nichols


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