search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Interactive


LATIN AMERICA APUESTA TOTAL


Apuesta Total: How to master the Peruvian market


In an expansive interview following his appearance at the SBC Digital Summit Latinoamerica, Gonzalo Pérez, CEO of Apuesta Total, spoke to G3 about the intricacies of the Peruvian market.


How has Apuesta Total become Peru’s market leading operator?


Apuesta Total was established in the Peruvian market in 2014. Peru is a very capitalist country with 33 per cent of the country living in Lima. We began operations in a city to the north of Lima called Trujillo which has a population of almost one million people, as opposed to ten million in Lima, so you can see the difference in the size of the markets. With almost one third of the population in Lima, Peru's capital is hugely important in contrast to other Latin American countries.


In 2018, we began an ambitious project of opening at least 20 shops per month for the next three years. Prior to this, we were a small brand with an online page and 15 shops. We were doing well but we needed to make the jump to a bigger brand as our initial goal was to become one of the main players in the market. At that moment, the only major player in the retail market was INTRALOT de Perú and on the online side was Inkabet and Betsson.


Following our expansion in 2018, we now have over 400 shops and are looking to have at least 800 shops in the coming years. Tis is very important as many people in Peru do not have bank accounts or credit cards, so we need to bring ourselves to their streets and neighbourhoods. Currently, there is no specific regulation and it is legal to operate sports betting in Peru as our constitution states that we can do whatever is not strictly prohibited and the only gambling prohibitions that we have are slot machines for kids and to organise dog races. Tat is why we can open a bank account, pay taxes, and do whatever any other company does without being specially taxed for our services.


P136 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA


Tis works in our favour as most other sports betting markets have a specific tax for their services, but currently Peru does not.


You refer to payments and how transactions are still predominantly made in cash. Do you see this changing anytime soon?


In Peru, 70 per cent of the workers are not on a payroll and they get their income paid daily in cash. Tis is a structural problem of the country – it is very expensive to hire and fire people, so cash in hand is preferable. It will be a while before this situation changes and more people are in the banking system. People have cash so that is how they bet in shops. Obviously, there will be a gradual shift towards credit cards and bank accounts, but this will be a slow transition. Terefore, it is important for us to have shops that offer cash and credit cards payments, but ultimately cash is king in the market.


Presumably, cash and retail being king has served to exacerbate the impact of Covid-19?


Covid has hit us very hard. 10 per cent of our incomes were from our website and the remaining 90 per cent from the retail channel. Our government shut down operations on March 16 and shops were only allowed to reopen at the beginning of July, excluding certain cities who remain in lockdown. It did give us the opportunity to work on our website – not just the product itself but in terms of the UX. We were able to negotiate with the payment processors better conditions– for example, we were previously offering around 13 dollars as a minimum deposit and now this is down to three dollars.


It was common for withdrawals to take between


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144