search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Insight


FUTURE OF PAYMENTS DR Gaming Technology


offering consumers choice. In my experience the answer talks to the human psyche:


Firstly, we want to know we have an option, it’s empowering. Have you ever been to an event where you can only use a certain payment provider, or cash only, it’s irritating isn’t it – we don’t like being told what we can and can’t do.


Secondly, we sometimes just like to feel the physical money. A wad of cash has a feel to it, doesn’t it? Whereas a card, or your phone (in the case of an e-wallet), feels exactly the same whether it has a balance of €0.00 or €10,000.00.


Cashless solutions and the technology powering them are continually evolving. How do you stay ahead of the curve and incorporate the latest developments into your solutions?


Now if I had to answer this question I’d be giving away all our secrets, wouldn’t I? Suffice to say, our CTO and our respective R&D directors and Product Managers spend a lot of time with existing service providers in this space, as well as with our customers, and new entrants to the sector in order to understand what the market needs; what the market is offering; and what the market may soon be offering.


drTicket enables players to transact cashlessly between multiple EGMs, tables, and operator venues. How do you ensure transactional security in a serverless ticketing solution?


I believe that what sets us apart from our competitors is indeed the serverless technology you refer to; that said I need to clarify that the offering we have relates to our system not having to be connected to a server at all times, it is not serverless per se’.


What is key, and it drives not only our reliability, but our affordability, and our functionality, is our patented drSMIB; to which all EGMs, Tables, Cash Desks, Player Kiosks and the like are connected. Via our drSMIB, operators are able to define parameters, amend user access and licence keys, and update and change various other details relating to individual EGMs or tables, as well as local and wide-area jackpots.


Tis functionality then extends to the entire gaming floor and its associated aforementioned support services too; each drSMIB (on which all edits are undertaken) then automatically synchronises with all other drSMIBs in the network as soon as any changes are made, in so doing ensuring unparalleled data redundancy, real-time data and reporting, and providing the transactional security you refer to.


Where do you see the next innovation for ticketing solutions?


P72 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA


The evolution model remains the same, with the adoption of new technology happening here at an even faster rate than elsewhere. One only has to refer to Carnival City Casino in Johannesburg, South Africa who as far back as late 1998 opened with not a single coin-operated slot machine or ticket printer, it was all carded game play from day one, and similarly Mexico where true cashless gaming has been around since the market opened in 2004. The solution for these regions exists and many operators have already embraced it, the key though, as I referred to earlier is the player, he comes first, and until he embraces it, that migration will be a trickle, not a flood.


Ticketing, despite its on-going use, was the precursor to SMART card technology, which in turn is being replaced by RFID and NFC technology; both of which now afford operators with significantly less expensive (approximately 50 per cent) and easier to use player card options, and ultimately place them in a position to migrate to both a cashless and cardless solution.


Our view remains that both TITO and player cards will become a ‘technology of the past’, in that order, over the next five to 10 years. In addition to the current pandemic, and its associated risks, TITO ticket costs are also becoming more and more prohibitive and also not very environmentally friendly.


Te move to RFID cards, and ultimately cardless gaming just makes commercial sense; even though the initial cost in issuing all players with an RFID card may seem prohibitive, after an average of what we would estimate to be no more than 100 TITO tickets being printed, the RFID cards have probably more than likely paid for themselves. Tey last far longer, do not need to be replaced as frequently as every transaction, (like a ticket), and when true


cardless technology is embraced there is nothing to print and as a result nothing to throw away.


Te move to coinless happened almost organically, and we see that a progression to cashless is not only inevitable, but logical; with many operators skipping the ‘stop off’ at TITO completely.


Real-time monitoring of payments is becoming increasingly important. What advances are being made in technology and data quality to improve the monitoring of player transactions?


I refer here again to our patented drSMIB, and our ability to guarantee uptime through the redundancy created across our drSMIB network, locally or across an operator’s entire estate.


Time is indeed money, and as long as operators are able to track all transactions, all the time, and as they happen, and then be notified of any ‘exceptions’ in real-time too, player and operator data and funds remain secure.


Emerging markets, such as South America and Africa, are predominantly cash dominant. How do you tap into these markets that hold huge potential? How do you tailor a cashless solution that utilises the latest technology to these markets?


What is key, and it drives not only our reliability, but our affordability, and our functionality, is our patented drSMIB; to which all EGMs, Tables, Cash Desks, Player Kiosks and the like are connected. Via our drSMIB, operators are able to define


parameters, amend user access and licence keys, and update and change various other details relating to individual EGMs or tables, as well as local and wide-area jackpots.


Te above statement is very true, but the evolution model remains the same, with the adoption of new technology happening here at an even faster rate than elsewhere. One only has to refer to Carnival City Casino in Johannesburg, South Africa who as far back as late 1998 opened with not a single coin-operated slot machine or ticket printer, it was all carded game play from day one, and similarly Mexico where true cashless gaming has been around since the market opened in 2004.


Te solution for these regions exists and many operators have already embraced it, the key though, as I referred to earlier is the player, he comes first, and until he embraces it, that migration will be a trickle, not a flood.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144