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Insight


RECRUITMENT & RETENTION Eyespy Recruitment


cornerstones of our business. Tey are the reasons Eyespy is a go-to brand for iGaming talent acquisition for so many businesses and C-level executives in the sector. Tose values permeate every project we undertake, giving candidates and clients the confidence to work with us again.


We give candidates genuine insight to the team and the challenges of the role. It is not pure sales - 'this is the utopian role, and you are going to be extremely happy' - it's about warts and all. Tis is what we ask the clients. What are the challenges of the role? Are there any difficulties in the culture? Are there people management issues?


When we speak to clients about a candidate, we'll be honest about whether you are interviewing with multiple processes - a common occurrence when a talented candidate is seeking a new job. Constant and open communication between the two parties underpins our success as an agency. Tose principals - honesty, trust, and integrity - are intrinsic.


Emma: Tere are quite a lot of sharks within recruitment. When we first started, we were tarred with that brush.


Jo: It's more like poor practice - they don't even speak to a candidate before sending their CV across, which is absolute madness. Tere is a lot of that about.


P48 WIRE / PULSE / INSIGHT / REPORTS


When we speak to clients about a candidate, we'll be honest about whether you are interviewing with multiple processes - a common occurrence when a talented candidate is seeking a new job. Constant and open communication between the two parties underpins our success as an agency. Those principals - honesty, trust, and integrity - are intrinsic.


Emma: Because we are very passionate about what we do and it's our name above the door, as well as many of our industry peers being friends, we couldn't stand the thought of having a bad reputation. It has always been about going above and beyond. Delivering high calibre candidates and service to our clients is more important than profit.


What makes a good recruiter?


Jo: Interviewing is the key skill for a recruiter, but it's not the only skill. You need to listen and display empathy for those you are recruiting for. Communication skills, being able to listen and interactive with your fellow humans, is fundamental. Obviously, you have a job description and a, b, and c to fill in terms of the experience, but that's only part of it. Te rest is chemistry.


How do you quantify chemistry? It comes down to spending time with candidates and having a decent conversation beyond walking through the CV. Understanding a bit about candidate's lives - their family and what's important to them. You can't get to know everything about


someone from an initial call, but it's so important to talk about things beyond the prospective role and career.


It is amazing how picking out parts of a conversation can help you in terms of figuring out what makes a person tick and how well they are going to get on with a hiring manager. It's a soft skill, which is bit of a fluffy answer, but there is no clear-cut methodology.


How do you build a meaningful relationship with candidates that is beyond 'top-show'? How do you get to understand a potential recruit when they're naturally guarded about their intentions and what they want to give away about themselves?


Jo: Years of experience enable you to pick up on the red flags. Asking candidates about their current role, what they like and don't like, what they respond well to and what their management style is are the questions where you really learn something about the kind of person they are. It's about the questions you ask to get a grasp of a candidate's personality type.


Emma: It all boils down to the relationships you have with the client and the candidate. From a client perspective, a FTSE business is very different to a start-up. Te need of the candidate to work 24/7 is more likely to fall into the latter category. Somebody might be more suited to working in a more corporate-type FTSE environment. It's all down to making the right fit.


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