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Insight


RECRUITMENT & RETENTION Eyespy Recruitment


Emma Clayton-Wright, Founder & Managing Director


Accelerating nature of online’s ongoing recruitment revolution


Jo Sykes, Founder & Director of Talent Acquisition


Specialising in iGaming and crypto, EyeSpy Recruitment is a recruitment agency with an international client base of FTSE businesses, SMEs, and start-ups.


G3 sits down for an in-depth joint interview with the agency's founding sisters to discuss the art of recruitment. Emma Clayton-Wright, Managing Director, and Jo Sykes, Director of Talent Acquisition, explain how iGaming's recruitment landscape has evolved over the last decade, culminating in an accelerated shift towards remote working and a recognition from employers that an office environment doesn't necessarily facilitate greater productivity.


Currently, the recruitment landscape is hugely buoyed within the online gaming space. Whilst other industries have been negatively hit by Covid-19, we have seen the demand grow hugely in the last 12 months. What makes the recruitment in online gaming so different to other industries is the constant innovation across products, markets, and technology.


Jo and Emma detail how they build a meaningful relationship with candidates beyond surface level CV talk, as well as discussing diversity, what an ethical recruitment partnership means in practice and the red flags they watch out for during the interview process.


How would you assess and rate the current iGaming recruitment landscape?


Emma:Te recruitment landscape compared to when I entered the space 17 years ago is totally different. If I think back to when my journey and passion for the gaming industry began at PartyGaming.com, there was no gaming talent out there, so we had to go for the next best thing - digital talent.


Previously, agencies weren’t as specialised within the iGaming industry. Over the years, clients have become more focused on the candidate experience and ensuring candidates have a good experience of the brand even if they don't attain the role. Tis aspect has come on leaps and bounds.


Currently, the recruitment landscape is hugely buoyed within the online gaming space. Whilst other industries have been negatively hit by Covid-19, we have seen the demand grow hugely in the last 12 months. What makes the recruitment in online gaming so different to other industries is the constant innovation across products, markets, and technology.


It is constantly challenging Jo and me to be at the top of our game, understanding what is going on in the marketplace and continually learning. It is hugely enjoyable.


Jo: I would say that the recruitment landscape has P44 WIRE / PULSE / INSIGHT / REPORTS


become much more sophisticated, and clients have a much higher expectation of the service they receive (as they should!). From a candidate experience, the talent pool has widened exponentially as you'd expect.


From our perspective, as time goes on you get more experience and skilled in what you do and subsequently refine and hone your craft. Tat is certainly something we have done in terms of our recruitment process.


Why specialise specifically in the iGaming and crypto sectors?


Emma: It has always predominantly been gaming for Eyespy, and in the last few years crypto has been added into the mix. Tere is a natural crossover in the type of talent crypto businesses like and desire from iGaming.


We touched on working in e-commerce a few years ago, working with the likes of Just Eat, Jet2 and Shop Direct Group (now Te Very Group), mainly because C-level contacts moved from gaming into those industries.


We were successful, but we felt it was too much diversification for our business. We recognised that we preferred and are better in the iGaming space. Te skills required, be it tech or data mining, were transferrable between the two industries, but there was a huge amount of gross potential in gaming, so we circled back to what we knew.


We've tried everything over the years. For example, we used to have a contracting vertical that saw us


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