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Lewis Pek Editor


Comment


July 2021


Every conversation with gaming industry contacts now revolves around the recommencement of the exhibition calendar. For the best part of 15 months the page opposite has been a placeholder for utter lies and fabrication. Only digital events have held their due dates, everything else has been away with the fairies.


We’ve only listed a handful of the shows taking place in September, but at the last count there are five gaming exhibitions, conferences or industry meet-ups taking place every day of that month. September has become a parking lot for industry events unlike anything we’ve ever seen before. It would be impossible to visit half the shows taking place, let alone be tested and self-isolate with enough turn- around time to make the next event. Meanwhile, show organisers continue to make bold statements, ‘100 per cent committed to opening doors on the dates advertised,’ before kicking the can down the road at the last minute.


“WHICH SHOW ARE YOU GOING TO?” IS CURRENTLY THE HOTTEST SWEEPSTAKE IN THE GAMING INDUSTRY.


Despite this, “Which show are you going to?” is the hottest sweepstake in the industry. It’s the biggest guessing game with so many external variables that no one has the answer, so we’re all using each other as sounding-boards. Partly it’s the anticipation of meeting up after so long, but it’s also the sense of paranoia that we’re going to miss out on a game-changing revelation. Enforced isolation has us constantly worried that the industry is moving on and we’re not keeping up.


Shows may seem like an irrelevance during a pandemic, but retail businesses count success by volume of people. ‘Good crowd on the floor tonight’ - ‘What were the exhibition attendance figures?’ Volume, capacity and turn-out are important numbers. But when gathering in large groups is the one thing we’re expressly told not to do - without it as a measure - how do we quantify success?


I’m definitely attending every show in September. You’ll be there too - right? EDITORIAL ADVERTISING


G3 Magazine Editor Lewis Pek


lewis@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0) 1942 879291


G3Newswire Editor Phil Martin


phil@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7801 967714


Features Editor Karen Southall


karensouthall@gmail.com


International Reporter James Marrison Staff Reporter William Bolton


william@gamingpublishing.com PRODUCTION


Senior Designer Gareth Irwin


Production Manager Paul Jolleys


Subscriptions Manager Jennifer Pek


Commercial Administrator Lisa Nichols


P4 WIRE / PULSE / INSIGHT / REPORTS


Commercial Director John Slattery john@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7917 166471


Business Development Manager James Slattery james@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7814227219


Advertising Executive Alison Dronfield alison@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)1204 410771


Contributors Liam Smith, Ian Shanahan, Jonathon Swaine, Chris Oltyan, Abhinay Bhagavatula, Ilya Machavariani, Richard Carter, Kent Young, Gray Wagner, Simon Hammon, Roy Greenbaum, Mark Claxton, Alexander Kamenetskyi, Daniel Schreiber,


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