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I have noticed with candidates and clients during this period something I have coined 'Covid kindness'


whereby people seem to have more time for others. There is a


for remote working and clients often said no.


In the second quarter of 2020, in the immediate throes of Covid-19, we attended a couple of digital forums where you had C-level executives discussing how their businesses reacted to the pandemic and managing employees remotely.


Even at that very early stage the consensus was that remote working had been a largely positive thing with increased productivity and people coping well with the change. Now we are over a year on, and most companies are looking at the reduced operational costs and are holding surveys about the future of their working environment.


Most candidates we speak to would like a balance. Very few are saying one or the other. I think it is nice for employees to have a genuine option on their work-life balance. It is very demanding being in this sector and if you don't have to commute, then it's better for all involved.


Emma: It also makes our job easier. We have always championed high-calibre candidates to our clients, but they wouldn't want to relocate to Malta or Gibraltar - not everyone wants to live on a Rock or leave their home country. Covid-19 has fast tracked the working environment by decades.


P46 WIRE / PULSE / INSIGHT / REPORTS


commonality of shared lockdowns and living with this virus regardless of background or geography. iGaming is a tight knit industry with a real sense of camaraderie, one which has really come to bear in this last 18 months.


What we are currently seeing may have come about in 20- or 30-years’ time. As Jo said, nobody was going to do it first, but the pandemic was a leveller. It's made employers and senior management more understanding to a work-life balance.


Jo: It is one of the silver linings of a horrible pandemic.


Emma: I have noticed with candidates and clients during this period something I have coined 'Covid kindness' whereby people seem to have more time for others. Tere is a commonality of shared lockdowns and living with this virus regardless of background or geography. iGaming is a tight knit industry with a real sense of camaraderie, one which has really come to bear in this last 18 months.


Jo: Covid has given everybody a real sense of empathy for their fellow human beings. Before, it was all work orientated and if you were


working from home and the dog barked you would die a thousand deaths inside because someone would frown on the other end of the call. Now it’s understood that you can work very well and overachieve in your job from home and that a ‘work environment’ isn't the be-all and end-all.


How have recruitment directives changed pertaining to diversity and inclusion in the workplace?


Jo: Companies are becoming more aware of gender inequalities. I have never been in a scenario whereby a manager has said 'I want a female for this role' but you will have a hiring manager touch on what the current set-up of the team is and an inference that it would be preferable to have more of a balance.


I would say most of our clients want to see gender diversity in shortlists. 10 years ago, it was completely male dominated from a candidate perspective. Tat is now no longer the case.


Emma: We don't get asked by companies to ensure a shortlist is comprised of women, but there is an obvious need for more women in senior management and C-level roles. As women ourselves and I have a daughter, we always encourage women to ensure they are positioning themselves how a male would.


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