This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
July, 2017


www.us-tech.com


Page 71


“V8 Power” and Nanometer Precision in PI Piezo Motor


Auburn, MA — PI (Physik Instru - mente) has introduced a new, robust OEM walking motor drive, the N-331, with its configuration rooted in exist- ing patented piezo actuator technology and a patented piezo stepping motion principle design. Unlike traditional electromag-


netic motors, piezo motors do not cre- ate magnetic fields, nor are they


they automatically hold position without any need for power. PI’s PICMAWalk piezo linear


motor uses eight PICMA® piezo actu- ators arranged in a V-shape, similar to a classic V8 engine, to achieve high push/pull and holding forces along with nanometer precision. The space-tested PICMA actua-


tors are reliable, providing 60N power-off holding force and 50N push/pull force. The maximum velocity is speci- fied at 15 mm/s (0.6 in./s) and loads


up to 5 kg (11 lb) can be positioned with nanometer precision. The units are available with


three standard travel ranges from 25 to 100 mm (1 to 3.9 in.) in both open and closed-loop configurations. The closed-loop models incorporate a high- precision incremental encoder with nanometer resolution. The calculated piezo-mechanical resolution is accu- rate to one tenth of a nanometer. For maximum precision and reli-


ability, the piezo actuators are inte- grated in a solid-state flexure guiding


system, free of friction. Flexure ele- ments combine high stiffness and load capacity. They do not require mainte- nance or lubricants, are 100 percent vacuum compatible, function in a wide temperature range, and are


intrinsically wear-free. Contact: PI (Physik


Instrumente) L.P., 16 Albert Street, Auburn, MA 01501 % 508-832-3456 E-mail: info@pi-usa.us Web: www.pi-usa.us


See at SEMICON West, Booth 7219


N-331 piezo linear motor actuator.


influenced by magnetic or electric fields — a characteristics that is advantageous in applications from e- beam lithography to MRI technology. When large optics, detectors or


camera setups in industrial applica- tions need to be positioned with nanometer precision, it can be bene- ficial to cut the actuator power once the fine positioning process is com- plete.


If a motor or actuator is depend-


ent on a continuous current draw to hold a position, heat dissipation, electromagnetic fields and thermal effects may have negative influences on the performance of the system. PICMAWalk motors are self-clamp- ing; at rest or in steady-state mode


Plasma Etch Exhibits Plasma Cleaning Solutions


Carson City, NV —Plasma Etch is pro- viding live demonstrations of two of its most popular products, the PE-50 plas- ma cleaner and the plasma wand. The PE-50 is an affordable,


entry-level option for most types of plasma treatment. The unit is very popular at universities and research labs. Plasma Etch credits the PE-50’s success to its versatility and robust design. The PE-50 has simple con- trols and easy-to-read indicators for monitoring the plasma sequence. The plasma wand was intro-


duced by the company in 2016 to meet the need for a convenient, handheld plasma product for spot cleaning and research work. The wand is about the size of an electric toothbrush and requires only electricity to operate; no input gas needed. The plasma wand provides atmospheric plasma capable of increasing the bond strength and


printability of most surfaces. Contact: Plasma Etch, Inc.,


3522 Arrowhead Drive, Carson City, NV 89706 % 775-883-1366 Web: www.plasmaetch.com


See at SEMICON West, Booth 6461


1 2 16:36


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92