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July, 2017 Continued from page 56


determine the tool features they need for their applications. This saves the customer money by eliminating fea- tures they do not need. Bertagnolli suggests that by


using 3D modeling software, such as SOLIDWORKS, engineers can make modifications to an application in the most timely and cost-effective man- ner. For automated wet processing, the equipment manufacturer’s con- trol software should be able to inter- face with a customer’s host system when required in order to be able to remotely operate the tool. “Also, many customers forget to


determine how they are going to accommodate the new equipment in


www.us-tech.com


ed in order to optimize production. “It is not unusual for a customer


to come to us with a requirement, new process, new technology or something they have been doing manually, and have had their vol- ume requirements increased to the point where they need to automate,” says Bertagnolli.


Building In Safety Although production through-


put and product quality may be the highest priorities of many users of wet processing equipment, operator safety of both manual and automated equipment should also be a para- mount concern, particularly when processes involve the use of danger-


ous chemicals. The potential for fires from elec-


trical problems is a great concern within processing laboratory environ- ments. For that reason, explosion- proof motors and a variety of safety mechanisms are required when wet processing chemicals warrant such measures. With most designers and fabri-


cators, both manual and automated systems must meet the safety stan- dards set forth by organizations such as NFPA (National Fire Protection Association), SEMI (Semiconductor Equipment and Materials Interna - tional) and NEC (National Electric Code).


In some cases a low-throughput


Page 61 Selecting and Optimizing Wet Processing Equipment


research facility will automate wet processing simply for safety purposes because they don’t want employees to be exposed to potential hazards. In other instances, design engineers may advise customers against choos- ing a certain process or configura- tion, recommending a safer way to perform the operation. In Bertagnolli’s opinion, safety


comes first. “As far as JST is con- cerned: If there is a hazard, we strive to eliminate it,” she says. Contact: JST Manufacturing,


Inc., 219 E 50th Street, Boise, ID 83714 % 208-377-1120 fax: 208-377-3645 E-mail: info@jstmfg.com Web: www.jstmfg.com r


Full Flexibility with Ersa VERSAFLEX!


Tigress semi-automated wet processing system.


their clean room; how it will enter the facility, how much space it will occu- py, how much power, water, chemi- cals and gases it will require, and so forth,” explains Bertagnolli. “So, the equipment design engineers will need to plan for all those factors.”


Consider Evolving Requirements


Like other manufacturing pro -


cesses, wet processes such as clean- ing and etching often evolve over time. The upgrading or expansion of equipment to meet future require- ments can be unnecessarily expen- sive and time-consuming unless the requirements are integrated into the original equipment design. “If tools are designed to be modu-


lar, there is not usually any problem in reconfiguring or expanding them,” Bertagnolli says. “But the engineers that design the tool need to be aware of customers’ future plans to upgrade their operations for reasons like added throughput. All sorts of process expan- sions are possible, but it is very impor- tant for the design engineers to be aware of future plans at the initial design phase.” In some cases the customer’s ini-


tial wet processing equipment is semi- automated because production vol- ume does not mandate a fully-auto- mated system. But over time the vol- ume may increase to the point where a fully-automated system is warrant-


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Highlights Ersa VERSAFLOW 4/55 Highlights VERSAFLEX


 Processable area 20” x 20”  Use of up to 4 flux spray heads


 Product change without loss in production time with the multiwave process


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Ersa North America, Inc. 1779 Pilgrim Road Plymouth WI 53073 | USA Phone: +1 920 893 1779 Fax: +1 920 893 1562 selective.info@kurtzersa.com


Kurtz Ersa, S.A. de C.V. | Mexico Ersa Asia Pacific | China Ersa Hong Kong | China Ersa Shanghai | China Kurtz Ersa | France Ersa GmbH | Headquarters | Germany


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