This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
July, 2017


www.us-tech.com Road Map to Successful Thermal Testing Continued from page 50


changeover needed. Regardless of device size or thickness or socket depth, the Copperhead socket and WRTH pusher tooling are also designed to exert only the necessary amount of insertion force on the device every time. In a traditional thermal setup, a


6 x 6 QFN with 32, 40, or 48 pins on 0.4, 0.5, or 0.8 mm (0.016, 0.02, or 0.031) pitch would all require differ-


allows moving 16 devices at once at speeds of up to 7,200 UPH, depending on options. All of this with the same socket, the same board, and the same WRTH as used on the PET-5. Mirroring the simplicity and ver-


satility of the Copperhead and WRTH, all Exatron handlers are nearly “kit- less,” and what change over parts exist are often common across all handler models. In most cases, depending on the complexity of the system, nothing must be changed but the JEDEC tray, test site, and, if devices vary widely in size, pickup tips. Tools are rarely required and


often no mechanical adjustments are needed. All is controlled and adjust- ed with the company’s intuitive soft-


ware interface. Every Exatron prod- uct can be easily adapted by adding and removing the wide range of “building blocks.” Start with a Model 800 table top test handler; add a WRTH, and add a camera to assist with alignment. Start with a Model 900; add a


pneumatic lift to aid test docking; add up to five JEDEC tray carriers; add top and/or bottom side 2D/3D pin/ball/bump inspection; add any of a large selection of OEM laser mark- ers; add a label printer; add tape and reel input or output with in-tape inspection; swap out JEDEC trays for waffle packs; add buckets or a bowl feeder or tube input/output; add magazine or boat input/output; swap


out servo-motor driven pickup heads for linear encoder-driven; add a WRTH; and add a built-in chiller. The same goes for the Model


8000. Add up to five automated JEDEC stackers; add laser marking; add vision; add thermal test; add multiple test docks; mix and match input/output options as needed. Exatron can adapt its products to just about anything a customer needs. The road to successful, scala- ble thermal testing can be a tricky one, but Exatron is driving forward. Contact: Exatron, Inc., 2842


Aiello Drive, San Jose, CA 95111 % 800-392-8766 fax: 408-629-2832 E-mail: info@exatron.com Web: www.exatron.com r


Page 53


We move electronics. Boost your production efficiency


PET-5 with WRTH test setup.


ent, specific insertion forces for the same device size. With the Copper - head socket, contact pressure is cor- rect every time without pitch-specific calibration, regardless of pin count or probe forces. This last point may not apply


specifically to hand test setups, but does become important when adding automation. In this area, the Copper - head socket has an additional benefit. It is designed such that precise mechanical alignment is unnecessary.


The Way Forward Exatron has honed its four


decades of experience into a diverse line of testing products that range from hand test workstations to 128- site, high-volume test handler sys- tems and an innovative “building block” design method that allows easy adaptability to customers’ exact needs.


The PET-5M workstation can


be mounted directly, without the need for expensive docking plates, to the same DUT board used in a high- volume production handler with the same socket. The PET-5M has a WRTH, which can be moved into test position by hand and then lowered into place with a pneumatic switch. One small step up to the PET-5C adds a cylinder which moves the WRTH from side to side and allows computer control over setting and monitoring temperature, insertion force, soak timers, data logs, and diagnostics. That same DUT board and sock-


et can be quickly removed and mount- ed on a 900 series small-volume han- dler, like the 903 QTE, which emu- lates high-volume production on an engineering-level machine. Also fitted with a WRTH, the 903 QTE can test up to four sockets at the same time from –55 to +155°C (–67 to +311°F). For high-volume device test, the


same DUT board and socket can be mounted on an 8000 series handler with up to five automated device stackers, each holding up to 40 thin JEDEC trays. The heavy construction of the 8000, combined with sub- micron linear encoder-driven gantries


Our new dual head laser marker combines speed with efficiency. From laser marking to PCB handling solutions, FlexLink  automateproduction flow solutions that increases overall line efficiency.


With our range of stand-alone units to turnkey solutions, our PCB include independent modules with a wide variety of functions.


For more information, please contact us at 610-973-8200 or by email at info.us@flexlink.com.


flexlink.com


FlexLink is part of Coesia, a group of innovation-based industrial solutions companies operating globally headquartered in Bologna, Italy. www.coesia.com


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