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Lewis Pek Editor


Comment


March 2020


Padding the walkways of the ICE London show last month, the small number of people wearing face masks were largely derided by the majority choosing a non- surgical attire for the gaming exhibition. The general concensus being that such precautions were overkill.


Several weeks later, as Covid 19 continues to spread around the world and more and more countries begin to impose travel restrictions and instigate quarantines, the timing of the ICE show looks increasingly fortuitous. Much debate at the show centred on the G2E Asia show in Macau to be held in May this year. No official announcement had been made as G3 went to print in relation to the event, but the feeling right across the spectrum at ICE was that the event would be postponed, if not cancelled. And is this the fate of more exhibitions to follow?


The movement of people is such an intrinsic part of the fabric of the gaming industry, from its exhibitions and conferences, from guests moving from local to national and international play at retail locations, to the sporting events that fuel the betting industry as sports people hop around the globe, fill stadiums with people - so much is dependent on the free movement of people. The Coronavirus puts so


CAN COMPANIES AFFORD TO SEND STAFF TO MEET CLIENTS IN COUNTRIES WITH EVEN MINOR LEVELS OF INFECTIONS?


much at risk. Can companies afford to send staff to meet with international clients, knowing that they’re sending employees to countries with even minor levels of infections? Could they be quarantined abroad - could they become infected - could they sue?


We are already seeing exhibitors from some of the world’s major events publicly announcing their withdrawal. Sony has stated that it’s cancelling its attendance at trade events in America, a country without any major incident at the time of writing, to avoid the possibility of the further spread of the virus.


The impact on machine-based sectors is also being felt as supplies of components from China are starting to dry up as factories remain closed and workers travel continues to be restricted. Trying to plan the calendar year for events in 2020 is going to be extremely difficult and complex as the logistical and human factors of balancing the needs of business and trade are weighed against the risks.


Whether or not you think this is an over-reaction, as many thought at the ICE show, the affect of the Coronavirus will have serious consequences for the gaming industry in 2020.


EDITORIAL


G3 Magazine Editor Lewis Pek


lewis@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0) 1942 879291


G3Newswire Editor Phil Martin


phil@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7801 967714


Features Editor Karen Southall


karensouthall@gmail.com


International Reporter James Marrison Staff Reporter William Bolton


william@gamingpublishing.com Contributors


Lutz Schenkel, Simon Mukerjee, Chris Wieners, Kevin Reid, Lee


Drabwell, Joe Asher, Ray Lesniak, Sara Slane, Rohini Sardana


P4 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA ADVERTISING


Commercial Director John Slattery john@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7917 166471


Business Development Manager James Slattery james@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7814227219


Advertising Executive Alison Dronfield alison@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)1204 410771


PRODUCTION


Senior Designer Gareth Irwin


Production Manager Paul Jolleys


Subscriptions Manager Jennifer Pek


Commercial Administrator Lisa Nichols


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