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Interactive


BETTING ON SPORTS AMERICA APRIL 28-30, 2020


New Jersey: beating the odds


Betting on Sports America will be celebrating the phenomenal growth online sportsbooks have achieved in New Jersey on April 28-30 at the Meadowlands Exposition Center. Among the comprehensive line-up of industry experts will be Raymond Lesniak, without whom there wouldn’t be an American sports betting market


Raymond J. Lesniak Former New Jersey Senator


Senator Raymond J. Lesniak served 40 years in the New Jersey Legislature, was Democratic State Chair 1992-94, New Jersey Chair for Clinton-Gore and for Gore-Lieberman, authored three books, including Beating the Odds: The Epic Battle That Brought Legal Sports Betting Across America, What’s Love Got To Do With It?: The Case For Same Sex Marriage, and The Road to Abolition: How New Jersey Abolished The Death Penalty. In 2009, Raymond won the international Human Rights Award at Le Memorial de Caen, Normandy, France.


G3 speaks to the former state senator who spearheaded and helped fund New Jersey’s efforts to legalise sports betting despite the overwhelming odds about the big issues ahead for the U.S. gaming industry as it establishes itself, New Jersey’s potential and complications surrounding the Wire Act.


New Jersey's sportsbooks and online casinos have started 2020 in much the same way they spent the preceding: with new records and more growth. In December alone, New Jersey’s online and retail sportsbooks collected €557.8m in bets, up 74.7 per cent from the same period in 2018.


When these eye-watering statistics were put to the former New Jersey state senator, he rebutted any suggestion these figures were in any way a surprise: “I would go as far as to say I would be shocked if was anything less! New Jersey has always loved its sports both at college and professional level.


Betting On Sports America April 28-30, 2020 Meadowlands Exposition Centre New Jersey, US


“We are the second wealthiest state in the nation with a large upper middle-class demographic – if you are looking for somewhere to set up a sportsbook, New Jersey is and always was going to be the perfect location to do so. Te people of New Jersey love to bet as more often not they


P108 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA


can beat the sportsbook and outcast other bettors simply because they are smarter than they are.”


Over 18 months after the repeal of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA), New Jersey’s sportsbooks are already closing in on Las Vegas territory. “My prophecy from all those years ago has become a reality,” said Raymond. “New Jersey has quickly established itself as the sports betting capital of America. It’s easy to forget that the majority of Atlantic City’s casinos was strongly opposed to my effort to legalise sports betting in New Jersey as they did not want to give up their Nevada monopoly. However, the pressure I kept up finally brought them on board.”


VOILA!


Raymond’s latest book, Beating the Odds: Te Epic Battle Tat Brought Legal Sports Betting Across America, details how he chipped away at the leagues’ perceived moral high ground by pointing out their hypocrisy through to the day that the United States Supreme Court declared the sports betting ban unconstitutional on May 14, 2018.


Pressed on the journey to overturning PASPA, Raymond reflected: “At the time, two major racetracks were on the verge of closing and it was absolutely imperative for me that New Jersey preserve its sporting heritage. I was Chair of the Economic Growth Committee which focused on the economic development aspect of keeping sports betting alive. From a young age, me and my dad were big on our horse betting – a pleasure which was dying on the vine. I wrote a


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