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Anyone out there in Congress listening? We need your help. A vital industry in New Jersey is dying. You’re our only hope. Not really, there is another: Dubai. Yes, that Dubai. We're not talking port security here. We're talking horseracing. Sell the racetracks to Dubai. There's your snowboarding. Horseracing is in their blood.


blog over ten years ago saying sports betting could save horse racing as snowboarding did skiing. I have long maintained the same could be done with casinos and sports betting.”


Following some research, namely a combination of ‘Raymond Lesniak’, ‘Skiing’, ‘Snowboarding’ and ‘Horseracing’, the blog, posted on January 23rd, 2008, still makes for a fascinating read despite 12 years’ worth of hindsight.


Detailing two ways to attract new fans to horseracing and bring the industry back to life, Raymond wrote: ‘One answer is sports betting. Earlier this year I proposed lobbying Congress to lift the existing ban on sports betting in all states other than Nevada in response to yet another multimillion illegal gambling bust around Super Bowl time. My proposal attracted


one big snore despite being, I might add, well thought out…


Anyone out there in Congress listening? We need your help. A vital industry in New Jersey is dying. You’re our only hope. Not really, there is another: Dubai. Yes, that Dubai. We're not talking port security here. We're talking horseracing. Sell the racetracks to Dubai. Tere's your snowboarding. Horseracing is in their blood. Tey will make a huge investment and tailor racing to high quality races. Te season will be shorter, but it will attract high roller types. Either way, New Jersey wins: saving jobs, open space preservation, more tourism. Voila!’ Voila, indeed.


THE WIRE ACT Seven years after an original Department of


Justice (DOJ) legal opinion cleared the way for states to regulate online casino, poker and lottery games, the legal landscape for US online gaming has been clouded by the Trump administration’s decision to reverse that opinion and advise that the 1961 Wire Act applies to gambling activities beyond sports betting after all. Having previously tried and failed to get Congress to amend the Wire Act to expressly include internet gaming, billionaire casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, the largest individual donor to the 2016 Trump campaign, has kicked off another lobbying effort.


“Te Wire Act is a huge complication,” stated Raymond. “Sheldon Adelson is playing rope a dope – the mere overhang of threatening to shut down internet gaming has restricted the expansion of other states compacting and limited investment - which is unfortunate as it is exactly what the DOJ wanted to achieve. Adelson believes internet gaming is the death knell of brick and mortar casinos which is ridiculous because people who bet on sportsbooks like to be where the action is.”


In January, a 52-page appeal by the DOJ challenged a federal judge’s decision supporting internet gambling, signalling that the U.S. Attorney General endorses the prohibition of


NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA P109


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