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Interactive


BETTING ON SPORTS AMERICA APRIL 28-30, 2020


Sports betting USA: Into the big leagues


Nearly two years has passed since the repeal of PASPA and the sports betting market is rapidly establishing itself as one of the biggest in the industry. Ahead of her induction into the Sports Betting Hall of Fame at Betting on Sports America, Sara Slane brings us up to speed on recent events


Sara Slane, Founder Slane Advisory


Sara Slane has been named in the Sports Betting Hall of Fame Class of 2020, in recognition of the important role her advocacy played in the successful campaign to overturn the federal ban on sports betting.


Slane will be one of five leading industry figures inducted at a ceremony in New Jersey during the second edition of SBC’s Betting on Sports America trade show this April.


After moving to the American Gaming Association (AGA) as Senior VP – Public Affairs in 2014, Slane became a key strategist and spokesperson for the industry, promoting key messages to the media and appearing in front of Congress and state legislatures. Slane left the AGA last year to found her own strategic advisory consultancy.


Founder of Slane Advisory and former Senior Vice President of the American Gaming Association, Sara Slane discusses the relationship between the major leagues and sports betting.


How has the sports betting market developed since the repeal of PASPA?


I think it has developed a lot faster than anyone thought it was going to. Legislation has moved quickly but more still needs to be done. Tere is a brilliant opportunity for in-play proposition betting should operators and the major leagues work together but it is going to take a couple of years before that will happen.


According to the American Gaming Association, legalised sports betting has had a positive influence on how the gaming industry is viewed by the public. To what extent is this the case?


I think the perception of gaming has evolved in recent years. When PASPA went into effect in 1993, there were less than five states with some form of casino gaming. Now there are 41 states and counting with a broad range of commercial casinos, tribal casinos and lotteries.


Betting On Sports America April 28-30, 2020 Meadowlands Exposition Centre New Jersey, US


P112 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA


Te perception of gaming as a whole has modernised and sports betting is just another facet of that. A lot of people are already participating in sports betting, whereas it was


the taboo thing to do back in the 90s. Tings have changed dramatically.


How problematic is the illegal market for operators?


Whilst regulatory restrictions need putting in place, tight regulations and high tax rates are restricting operators and creating a competitive disadvantage for legal operators. Receiving tax proceeds is important but it is also vital operators are not encumbered from competing. New Jersey is an example of what can happen when operators are taxed less - their recent handle numbers are astonishing.


What is your view on New Jersey’s recent success?


Sports betting is a low margin vertical. Its margin can grow but it will take time and legislators should look at that. Tere is a lot of excitement and fervour for operators to be in New Jersey given their friendly regulatory stance towards operators. New Jersey wants to attract innovative operators and products, and you have to give them a lot of credit because the numbers are reflective of that.


What is the market potential for sports betting across the United States?


Who knows? It ultimately comes down to how many states open up. Mobile will be a key success driver and critical component. I’d say a market potential of over €100bn would be a safe estimate. A lot comes down to policies, regulations and innovation. It is currently a stifled industry as regulatory structures are restrictive. Once licensing requirements and investment capital shifts in tandem with the


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