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BUILDING DESIGN


AA A


D


ECOTECT is used for shading and lighting calculations, in figure two a 3D Model structure is initially created in AutoCAD from measurements of the building for analysis.


a: Front yard design A


BB B b: Semi-courtyard


C c: Courtyard AB C BC


Ventilation design For all five rehabilitation centres the Mashrabiya (an arabic term given to a type of projecting oriel window enclosed with carved wood latticework) concept and Brise soleil design (Brise soleil from French, ‘sun breaker’), in architecture refers to a variety of permanent sun-shading techniques, ranging from the simple patterned concrete walls popularised by Le Corbusier) is used to soften the rays of sun and to maximum the use of UV rays along with softening the radiation, because access to natural light is crucial for reducing spatial disorientation, elevating moods, and potentially reducing the amount of pain medication needed by the patient.


DE C d: Courtyard and backyard


D e: Typical courtyard


Figure 3: Universal corridor design, simple and intuitive, this is easy to understand, regardless of user experience, knowledge or language skills.8


the use of right angles in the layout. To understand the geometry of connectivity as longest lines of sight (Fig. 4) the linearity of a corridor invites gentle sun for most of the day. This has fewer turns and higher connectivity which is an ability to reach from one point to another as desired by


inhabitants. Determinant four: Lighting (Shine) – Although lighting comes in two forms: artificial or natural, natural light offers both patients and caregivers plenty of health benefits, in terms of physical and mental health.1


people to less sunlight, and among the major outcomes is weakening of the immune


system’. Determinant five: (Sustain) – A passive solar building is designed to maximise the use of natural systems to maintain thermal comfort for the occupants. The term ‘passive’ implies a conceptually simple approach that uses few, if any, moving parts or input energy, requires little maintenance or user control, and results in no harmful pollution or waste by-products.


1 The rehabilitation centres for lepers


‘bring the outdoors inside’ to create a connection with nature these simple universal shapes help create this connection between inside and outside. Natural lighting is a key tool in creating this connection. Sunlight is specifically beneficial to leprosy patients who have long hospital stays, because they have the ability to look out to have a sense of time of day and observe the weather. Studies show that natural daylight reduces depression.12 Increasing evidence examined the beneficial health aspects of ‘day lighting’ interior spaces. Day light helps to control disease. Bacteria and viruses are naturally controlled by daylight, according to Benya.1


3


Rehabilitation centres with daylighting have less bacteria and other health issues related to virus and infection HICPAC.1


4 Daylight


prevents Vitamin D deficiency (which is the cause of leprosy disease), Hobday explains ‘because humans receive 90% of Vitamin D from sunlight, interior-centric living exposes


94


Thermal analysis Firstly, a thermal zone represents an enclosed space within which the air is free to flow around and whose thermal conditions are relatively consistent. In most cases, any room that can be closed off with a door would be a separate zone. Adjacent utility spaces such as store rooms, toilets and corridors can often be grouped together into the one zone.


‘Few studies have dealt with the comparative analysis of morphologies based on the Asian concept of front yard, back yard and courtyard rehabilitation centres.’


Conclusion Results show that traditional leper centres are constructed with a passive design low energy or 0 energy rehabilitation centre. The research also found that the traditional leper rehabilitation centres are low or 0-maintenance. Secondly, the research studied the impact of axial access of corridor for highly challenged users and varying abilities of self-controlled. Simple key plans to facilitate these special patients. Thirdly, the experiment demonstrated a method for universal plan types with potential to qualify healing power in other ward types.





References 1 Americans with Disability Act Access Guidelines (ADAAG) and Americans with Disabilities Act 1990 ADA.


2 Fouts M and Gabay D. Healing Through Evidence-Based Design. Oncology Issues (May/June 2008). http://accc-cancer.org/ oncology_issues/articles/mayjune08/fouts.pdf


3 Thermal Comfort: +3 (hot), +2 (warm), +1 (slightly warm), 0 neutral, -1 slightly cool, -2 cool, -3 cold.“That state of mind which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment” (ASHRAE) American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers. Benedetti F, Colombo C, Barbini B, Campori E, and Smeraldi E. Morning sunlight reduces length of hospitalization in bipolar depression Journal of Affective Disorders 2001; 62(3): 221-223.


4 Designed by architects: Per Christian Brynildsen and Jan Olav Jensen Fjellhamar, Norway. Client: Norwegian Free Evangelical Mission, India Trust Oslo, Norway, Completed:1995.


5 Ulrich. Definition of ‘Evidence-based design (EBD).


6 Long Y, Baran K, and Moore R. (2007). The role of space syntax in spatial cognition Proceedings. 6th International Space Syntax Symposium, Istanbul.


7§McCullough C. (2010). Evidence-based for healthcare facilities. MSN page 136 ISBN-13: 9781-930538-76-4.


IFHE DIGEST 2014


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