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BUILDING DESIGN


the accurately recorded 3D model has data attached to all elements and can be used in the ongoing maintenance and management of a facility. An example of how an ideal facilities management system would work in the future is shown in Figure 7. This illustrates how the 3D graphical representation of components/ systems is core in assisting the facilities manager to determine the current status of systems and equipment through a user- friendly visual interface that links all project documentation, such as 2D drawings with an asset database and live performance data.


Technical and non-technical considerations For any organisation considering BIM implementation, there are many aspects to consider, including those both technical and non-technical.7


The process of BIM needs to Figure 5: View of BIM showing all building services for a single level of a building.


be strategically linked to business decisions, in addition to the technical ones. Although the selection of BIM-related technology, and its use, does play a major part in the ultimate outcomes for project/building information, the deciding factor should be about how the technology responds to the business needs and not vice versa.8 From the author’s perspective, best


Figure 6: View of BIM showing all building services for a full building.


detection’ – which allows for all elements in the model to be tested against other disciplines – there is the ability for a design to commence construction ‘clash-free’, reducing risk in the construction and commissioning of new or refurbished buildings. BIM can also facilitate pre- fabrication and systemised or modularised design. For health facilities the opportunity to test the installation methodology and construction phasing in a virtual sense is fundamental to reducing the risk to hospital operations. If structured correctly, the interoperable information that is accurately reflecting the final built structure can be exchanged to integrate with an asset/facilities management system. In this context, the challenge is for the design and construction industry to collect enough of the right type of


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information. It will not be helpful to a facility manager to receive a BIM (model) which is too cumbersome in size and with irrelevant information. Of course, this type of ‘relevant’ information will depend on the specific requirements pertaining to the specific operational performance drivers for the user. This implies that asset and facilities managers need to be involved in the design and construction process as a stakeholder, which from the author’s perspective, is not very common in the current Australian context. This requirement does not only relate to Healthcare projects, it is a wider AEC industry issue, which is fundamental to realising a more efficient, effective and less wasteful future. Figures 5 and 6 indicate the amount of information that could be presented to facilities managers in an ideal scenario where


practice indicates that it is the business objectives that should decide how BIM technology and processes develop. This is precisely what the draft ISO 55000 series to be published by the International Standards Organisation (ISO) in 2014 will stipulate. This new ‘Strategic Asset Management International Standard’ is based on the British PAS 55:2008, which looks at optimised management of physical assets. Essentially this document defines asset management as ‘the coordinated and optimized planning, asset selection, acquisition/development, utilization, care (maintenance) and ultimate disposal or renewal of the appropriate assets and asset systems.’9 The majority of current and previous BIM adoption/implementation is for successful project outcomes and not necessarily focused on the long-term application of the data.10 However, BIM data is reliable data.8


If BIM


implementation is managed successfully, all players should benefit, but the real opportunities lie in the long-term benefits for owners, operators and facility managers.1


The future for BIM in Australian healthcare As previously mentioned, there are many ways in which BIM (processes and technologies) are currently being applied in the design and delivery of healthcare facilities. If future processes can ensure the delivery of interoperable, reliable and structured data at all stages of a building’s life-cycle then the possibilities and opportunities for healthcare design broaden significantly. It is admirable that, despite there being no


government mandate in Australia, or fully comprehensive National standards pertaining


IFHE DIGEST 2014


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