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CONTINUITY PLANNING


Patterns. Day 1 A Day 3 Day 7 Day 14 Day 30 Day 90


B


C


emergency patients are treated. More than 40% of hospitals follow this pattern, which is the most common. These hospitals restore activity levels to normal quickly, generally in


about two weeks. Pattern C: Delayed recovery – The


activity levels of many hospital functions are reduced due to damage in the initial stage of the disaster, and the hospital cannot treat emergency patients for a month or more. This pattern accounts for around one-fifth of the hospitals surveyed. It is important to prevent an increase in hospitals in this pattern when a region-wide disaster occurs. In order to determine the causes of these


different patterns of hospital activity, we looked at the relationship with the damage initially caused by the disaster and found that activity progression patterns correlated with damage amount and location (Table 3). The damage scores show the number of


Initial damage location


Buildings Facilities Supplies


evaluation items for which activity level is less than 50% one week after the disaster occurs. With Pattern A (Treating patients), damage


is relatively minimal (average damage score of 2.4), and staffing levels in particular are sufficient. This shows that hospitals with large numbers of staff have an advantage when treating patients during a disaster. Pattern B (Standard recovery) has the least amount of damage (average damage score of 1.7), and damage to buildings, facilities and other physical infrastructure is minimal. Pattern C (Delayed recovery) has the most damage (average damage score of 4.6), with many of the hospitals suffering damage to buildings, facilities and other physical infrastructure. This suggests at minimum that disaster preparedness measures for buildings, facilities and other physical infrastructure need to be strengthened in order to prevent delayed recovery.


‘The Great East Japan Earthquake was a major, magnitude 9.0 earthquake and one of the largest ever recorded in Japan.’


Looking at overall totals, over 70% of


hospitals had damage to utilities, and over 50% had damage to supplies and communications, which suggest that measures predicated on this type of damage need to be a part of hospital BCP. Disaster diagnostic tools comprehensively


evaluate hospital activity during disasters like a self-triage and therefore serve as an


Table 3: Activity progression patterns and initial damage. Hospital number


1 2 3 4 5689 10 11 13 14 15 16 22 23 24 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 46 48 49 50 No. Ratio damaged (%) 9 25.7


x x x x x x


Communications x x x x Utilities Staff


x x x x x


x x x


x x x


x


x xxxx x x x x


x x x x


x x x x x x xxxx x xx 14 40.0 xxxxx xxx x 18 51.4


x xxxxxxxxxx xx xx xxxxx x x


xxxxxxxxxxx 19 54.3 x 25 71.4 6 17.1


Damage score 6 2 6 1 1115512242431221121154553222312 A V E. 2.6


Activity CB C B A B A A C B B B A C A C BBBB A A A B C A C C A BBBB A A 35 100 progression pattern


42 IFHE DIGEST 2014


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