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CONTINUITY PLANNING


Shigehiro Taguchi – Residential & Living Environmental Design Department, Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei Inc.


BCP: learning from the Japanese experience


Since the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, much greater attention is being paid to business continuity planning (BCP) in hospitals and this has become an important management issue for hospitals that have a mission of providing medical services for the community.


The Healthcare Facilities Management (FM) Study Group of the Japan Facility Management Association defines ‘facility level’ as the degree to which the medical environments, or places that make up a hospital, match up with medical services that medical operations seek to provide; or the degree of effectiveness or results these environments or places bring about in evaluations conducted by the hospital on therapeutic outcomes or diagnostic precision. Improving the facility level is the essential role of FM in hospitals. Continuation of medical activities during


disasters is an important operational objective, and for this reason hospitals need to raise their facility level during disasters. Accordingly, FM is an extremely effective approach to hospital BCP because hospital environments, where multiple elements are linked and function together – including buildings, facilities, medical supplies, utilities and staff – are comprehensively utilised. The Great East Japan Earthquake was a


major, magnitude 9.0 earthquake and one of the largest ever recorded in Japan. It caused massive damage across a wide region, destroying buildings, causing fires, producing ground liquefaction, and severing essential transport and utility lines. The earthquake also generated a giant tsunami, over 10m


Initial period


Disaster to several hours


Cannot move because transportation paralised


Chaos period


Several hours to 2 or 3 days


Increase in surgery/trauma patients brought in by ambulance


Activities via hospital BCP


Accommodate demand with insufficient supply


Issue 3:


Disaster occurs


Response capacity


Issue 1: Minimise temporary decline


Disaster reduction capacity


Figure 1: Hospital activities during disasters.


high, that destroyed entire towns along the coast. Almost 80% of hospitals in the disaster region were either partially damaged or completely destroyed, and due to the damage the remaining hospitals had to treat large numbers of patients with degraded functions. When many hospitals are damaged and a


great deal of city infrastructure, including transportation and utilities, is degraded, continuing medical activities becomes extremely difficult, so extensive advance measures and other preparations are needed. Some hospitals were able to handle large numbers of patients and some were not. Comparing and analysing both groups shows


Evacuation period


Increase in internal medicine patients due to worsening environment


Figure 2: Change in medical demand in major disasters. 40 IFHE DIGEST 2014 Recovery/reconstruction period Several days to several weeks Several weeks to several years


Increase in mental illnesses caused by disaster- and evacuation-related stress


how certain patterns in hospital functions can be effective in making a hospital as disaster-tolerant as possible.


Shigehiro Taguchi


Shigehiro Taguchi joined Mitsubishi Estate Co., Ltd. in 1990 and moved to Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei Inc. in 2001. He is currently Head of the Healthcare Facility Design Office, Residential & Living Environmental Design Department.


He Joined the JFMA Healthcare FM Study Group in 2006. Following the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 he has been engaged in research on facility management tools for business continuity planning for hospitals.


He has extensive supervisory design experience in creating medical facilities such as clinics and hospitals, care facilities for the elderly such as special care homes and health care facilities, and care-provided accommodation for the elderly such as pay-for homes.


Medical response capacity reduced


Recovery capacity Issue 2: Minimise duration affected Rebound capacity Time


Quickly restore reduced capacity (regular BCP)


Handle normal plus extra demand


Accommodate new demand (hospital BCP)


Supply/demand


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