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ENERGY MANAGEMENT


Table 2: Addenbrooke’s Hospital, summary of predicted internal air and dry resultant temperatures for May to September, future Cambridge climate.


TRY DSY


2005 Existing 28.6 21.3 24.2


1 SMVHC 27.2 21.8 23.2 2 SMVRHC 24.9 21.6 23.0 3 NVMVPH 24.9 20.8 21.4 4 CVPH 5 SVPH


24.9 19.7 21.5 24.9 20.8 21.7


Existing 30.6 21.6 24.3


1 SMVHC 28.3 22.0 23.7 2 SMVRHC 26.1 21.8 23.1 3 NVMVPH 27.2 20.8 22.1 4 CVPH 5 SVPH


28.2 20.3 22.3 26.7 21.0 22.3


Existing


1 SMVHC 28.6 22.0 24.0 2 SMVRHC 26.2 21.9 23.2 3 NVMVPH 27.3 20.9 22.4 4 CVPH 5 SVPH


28.9 20.3 22.5 27.9 20.9 22.5


Existing


10 10 1041 399 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


na na


na na


0 0 0 0 0 0 2030s


93 59 0 36 0 0 0 6 3 32 0 13


31.0 21.2 24.3 163 87 0 64 0 0 0 11 18 41 2 12


1 SMVHC 28.6 22.3 24.2 2 SMVRHC 26.5 22.1 23.4 3 NVMVPH 28.1 21.0 23.0 4 CVPH 5 SVPH


29.7 23.3 23.0 28.3 21.1 23.0


31.7 20.7 24.5 232 152 0 151 0 1 15 110 96 136 11 87


859 395 na na


na na


4 0 21 3 0 0 2050s


866 351 na na


na na


2 0 22 4 4 0 2080s


806 396 na na


na na


23 0 136 46 10 0


30.1 21.3 24.3 115 60 1198 497 28.8 21.9 23.5 25.8 21.6 23.0 27.8 20.7 21.7 28.2 20.0 21.7 27.6 22.3 22.0


13 78 na na 0 0 na na 0 30


5 17 16 2 0 20


0 0 0 0


33.0 21.2 24.7 383 231 711 341 29.2 22.4 24.4 27.1 22.2 23.5 30.4 20.9 23.4


32.3 20.6 23.4 199 208 166 70 30.1 20.9 23.3 102 141 60 22


34.8 21.8 25.2 620 388 938 445 29.5 22.5 24.9 27.8 22.3 23.8


59 396 na na 2 23 na na


31.9 21.0 24.4 395 451 240 72 33.9 20.8 24.5 582 435 462 203 31.6 21.2 24.5 491 416 345 117


36.5 20.9 26.0 1035 609 1132 645 29.7 22.6 25.5 145 610 na na 28.4 22.3 24.2


20 84 na na


33.8 21.0 25.8 990 654 693 324 35.7 20.8 25.9 1060 638 870 577 34.1 21.3 25.7 1014 636 758 418


1 Night-time hours are 21:00 to 06:00. 2 Simulated hours are for May to September (153 days, 3672 hours). 3 The HTM03 threshold is based on air temperature and rest are based on dry resultant temperature. 4 The yellow shading shows where limiting criteria are exceeded. 6 The red shading indicates where the exceedence is deemed important in that it could not be easily corrected by refining the control strategy.


7 It is assumed that during the winter half of the year (October to April) the space will not overheat due to elevated ambient temperatures and solar gains. The limiting overheating values are therefore: HTM03, >50 hrs over 28˚C; BSEN15251, >438 hours above category upper thresholds and CIBSE, >37 night time hours (1%) over 26˚C).


8 The ambient temperature exceeds 28˚C in the current and future TRYs/DSYs by 2/44, 37/219, 62/341 and 126/566 hours in 2005, 2030, 2050 and 2080 respectively.


14 210 na na 0 5 na na 98 185 58 18


‘The strategy for the Nightingale pavilions seeks to enhance these buildings’ already high level of resilience to overheating.’


28 IFHE DIGEST 2014


Refurbishment option


Max. temperature (˚C) Min. temperature (˚C)


Mean night time1 temperature (˚C)


Total hours2 over 28˚C Night time1 hours over 26˚C


Total hours above Cat I Upper limit


Total hours above Cat II Upper limit


Min. temperature (˚C) Max. temperature (˚C)


Mean night time1 temperature (˚C)


Total hours2 over 28˚C Night time1 hours over 26˚C


Total hours above Cat I Upper limit


Total hours above Cat II Upper limit


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